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Roger Pocock Archive Riel Rebellion, 1885
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Loose item from 1885 scrapbook: letter to father (1 July 1885)

A handwritten letter from Roger Pocock in Prince Albert to his father in Ontario. Roger continues to be in sick bay in the "detachment station 1 1/2 miles from Fort Prince Albert" as he recovers from his toe amputation surgery. His letter is long and filled with his observations, comments, and responses to questions his parents have asked him in earlier letters.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1885 scrapbook: letter to father (1 March 1885)

A handwritten letter from Roger Pocock in Regina to his father in Ontario. Roger talks about how he is out of the Quartermaster's Store, and describes his current duties of stable work and prison guarding, etc. He discusses rumors about Riel and a potential rebellion, promising to write more as he learns further details.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1885 scrapbook: letter to father (March 1885)

A handwritten letter from Roger Pocock in Regina to his father in Ontario. Roger is about to depart from the NWMP fort at Regina, en route for Qu'appelle with a party of other NWMP constables. Two small sketches of a marching patrolman (Pocock) and the Fort is included in the written letter.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1885 scrapbook: letter to mother (1-11 May 1885)

A composite handwritten letter from Roger Pocock at Prince Albert to his mother in Ontario. Pocock is confined to a sick bed, while he recovers from having five toes of his right foot amputated due to frostbite. His letter is full of details about fellow NWMP force members, and he talks about his hoped-for reorganization of the Force; his observations of their skirmishes, marches, and dress, and asks for reading material to be sent to him while he recovers. Roger describes the march, his bout of frostbitten feet, toe amputations, skirmish at Duck Lake, and his days healing from the surgery.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1885 scrapbook: letter to mother (12 July 1885)

A handwritten letter from Roger Pocock in Prince Albert to his mother in Ontario. He describes the art work he has hanging near his bed, sketches he has completed, books he has read, prairie flowers, etc. and outlines the mail schedule for both sending and receiving letters.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1885 scrapbook: letter to mother (20, 25 July 1885)

A handwritten letter from Roger Pocock at Prince Albert to his mother in Ontario. The letter is descriptive of native dress and NWMP horse dress, complete with small illustrations to accompany the written description. Roger is uncertain about whether he will be able to remain with the NWMP, and discusses possible future options, including returning home for a visit. He continues the letter over a period of days, and describes for his mother problems with drunkenness in the Force, and related discipline problems. He also discusses the suicide of a Sioux prisoner in their Fort.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1885 scrapbook: NWMP notebook

A small string-tied, 15-page notebook with Roger's named stamped on the front cover and N.W.M.P. written in ink on the cover. The inside pages include handwritten notes and statistics compiled by Pocock about kit prices; Troop Depot Divisions and expenses; discharge statistics; pay rates; rations; ranks; death statistics and other short notes related to events from 1883-1885 involving the NWMP. Included in the booklet is a clipping detailing trail distances in Western Canada.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (30 August 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 30 August 1886. Pocock details a conversation he had with Captain Perry, the leader of his troop. They had a discussion about Pocock's injury, where Pocock wanted to go to Regina to receive treatment but Perry warns against this because Pocock would miss the commission on all cases of injuries received during the Rebellion. Perry also informed him that through this commission Pocock is likely to receive a life-long pension. After this conversation, Pocock learns from others that the pension will likely be larger than Perry had said.
Pocock writes that the F Troop in Regina was inspected by John A. McDonald and thus received the nickname "Sir John's Pets." He also writes how many who were under fire during the rebellion were receiving medals and land grants, of which Pocock had received neither.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock Scrapbook (1885)

Pocock's 1885 scrapbook contains approximately 70 pages, with entries (many dated) in a very legible hand, numerous tipped-in and loosely inserted original drawings, autograph letters, illustrations, and clippings. A few leaves have clippings pasted over manuscript entries.

It is bound in quarter maroon leather and marbled boards, with paper label on the cover (labeled "1885"). A bookplate states "Be Traist" ("Be Faithful", the crest of the Innes Clan).

Entries record important events, which were either personally experienced or gathered first-hand from those directly involved. Shortly after his entry into the N.W.M.P., Pocock was immersed in the official response to the uprisings known as the North West Rebellion of 1885. His 1885 scrapbook conveys the activities related to the military operations, as he had access to direct information. He also records valuable observations of his life as a N.W.M.P. officer. He compiled a list of duty-related statistics (kit prices, N.W.M.P. personnel statistics, expenses, deaths, distance, and important dates with incidents noted), and transcriptions from other sources (including Riel's personal diary). The scrapbook is illustrated with his own pencil and ink sketches and drawings. Included are letters written to his family telling of his experiences with the N.W.M.P. and events relative to the North West uprising, some illustrated with drawings and maps, apparently retrieved for inclusion in the diary books which were to become the source for his planned autobiography. Interspersed throughout the scrapbooks are short stories, poems, and other jottings. Notably this scrapbook contains an early and very faded photograph of Big Bear.