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Roger Pocock Archive Prince Albert, SK
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Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to parents (1886)

A letter from Pocock to parents. The first part of letter missing as there is no greeting or date and the text starts with an incomplete sentence. Pocock writes about a forthcoming dance, how he has helped to prepare for it, and who has been invited to attend. He also talks about the fees associated with retrieving a gift from the post office in Prince Albert.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (14 March 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 14 March 1886. Pocock describes his displeasure with 'morning Church parades' as they are compulsory and force the troop to work on a Sunday morning; he participated in a silent protest with the rest of the troop during the sermon. He then describes the seriousness of his recent frost bite and his recovery from that injury. Uncertain whether the last part of this letter is missing.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (20 July 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 20 July 1886. Pocock describes a recent highway robbery, his debts, and the weather. He also describes an incident of dealing with an intoxicated man who was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct the night before. The man had drunk a concoction of copper sulphate and tartaric acid, which was called 'cider'. The man selling the 'cider' was fined $50; Pocock then writes about how the 'cider' has become a problem in Prince Albert.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother ([Spring 1886])

Letter from Pocock to his mother. The letter is undated but according to Pocock's description of the weather it was written in the spring and before May. Pocock has written several stories about Lake Superior that he plans to publish and asks his family to read and review them. Four deserters were captured and sentenced to 12-months imprisonment each. Pocock also describes a sermon on creation, the weather, and local costume.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (June 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated June 1886. Pocock is sending his mother his diaries. He first describes some of the highlights for each diary covering the years 1883-1886. Pocock the describes an incident of that week where he helped the drunk quarter master back into his building, which he was locked out of. Captain Perry has departed and the troop has been celebrating and drinking the whole week. Pocock writes about the changes within the camp because of Perry's departure. He also describes several other happenings around camp.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (11 October 1886)

Letter from R.P. to his mother sent from Prince Alberta, Saskatchewan, dated 11 October 1886. Pocock reports on an epidemic of typhoid in Battleford, Saskatchewan, and lists those who have died from it. He then writes about an incident in which he wrote to his friend, Harry Keenan, about how some of the NWMP officers were drinking hospital-issued alcohol, and how one of those officers read his postcard. Pocock suspected that he would be reprimanded by the commissioner, but that did not happen. Pocock has been promised by Captain Perry to be sent to Regina as soon as possible. Pocock requests that one of his stories be sent to Harper's and then complains about the poor quality of poems that get published. One of his stories was published in The Week and he criticizes it. Pocock responds to the news that Lady MacDonald, John A. MacDonald's wife, is staying with his sister Rose. He hopes to use the connection to secure himself a pension.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (September 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother sent from Battleford, Saskatchewan, dated September 1886. Pocock describes the area around Battleford and includes a map of the confluence of the North Saskatchewan River and Battle River and the locations of Battleford, the fort, the old town, the government building, and two troop camps. He also includes a sketch of the typical buildings in Battleford and a describes the town, the typical events, and people that live there.

Pocock, Roger