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Fort Chipewyan, AB
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"First mail flight from Edmonton Fort Simpson via Fort McMurray - Chipewyan - Fort Smith - Fort Resolution - Hay River Fort Providence - Fort Simpson - on the McKenzie [sic] River - Jan 1929"

Envelope labelled "First mail flight from Edmonton Fort Simpson via Fort McMurray - Chipewyan - Fort Smith - Fort Resolution - Hay River Fort Providence - Fort Simpson - on the McKenzie [sic] River - Jan 1929", contains:
b&w ; 9 cm x 14 cm print of group of men, sleds, and dog teams next to aircraft in snow, registration G-CASN, caption reads "Fort Resolution, Resolution 1929"
b&w ; 9 cm x 15 cm print of group of men next to aircraft, one standing out of cockpit, caption reads "Getting started - after over night temperature of -56˚F - below zero. CHD in cockpit with top section of engine cover. Crew man mechanic on ground with lower section" [has negative]
b&w ; 9 cm x 11 cm print of dog team pulling man and sled from aircraft, caption reads "On the river Fort Simpson Jan 1929" [other prints appear in 6-140] [has negative]
b&w ; 9 cm x 14 cm print of group of people around aircraft in the snow, mail bags beside, one man stands out of cockpit, caption reads "Fort Resolution NWT, Jan 25th 1929 first flight with mail. [Insp. Reilly]"

Correspondence, 20 May 1833

Correspondence from William Mackintosh at Fort Dunvegan to Chief Factor John Charles at Fort Chipiwean [sic].

The letter describes the arrival of men and children, the status of grain seeds, a need for new canoes, an account of skins at Fort Dunvegan, and transactions with other Hudson's Bay Company posts, including Fort Vermilion, New Caledonia, and Slave Lake. The letter also describes conflicts between trappers and "Beaver Indians" [Dane-zaa], and the hiring of Iroquois [Haudenosaunee] people. Slave (Slavey) labour is mentioned in passing.

PE001006 - Tour of Northern Hudson's Bay Company Posts

Unidentified photographer. Judging by the number of aerial photographs, those of bush planes, and the large number of Hudson’s Bay Company buildings and posts, this collection may document a tour of northern Hudson’s Bay Company posts in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario by someone linked with the HBC. Photographs of people usually show them holding fox furs. At least half of the photographs were taken during winter. Nearly all photographs are captioned on the back in pencil, and some are also numbered.
Places photographed include Fort McMurray (AB), Fort Chipewyan (AB), Embarras Portage (AB), Fort Vermilion (AB), Stony Rapids (SK), Moosonee (ON), Moose Factory (ON), Albany (ON), and Attawapiskat (ON).
A guide to the identified places is interleaved within the album.
In the group photograph, 42 adults stand on the steps of a building and smile for the camera. This photograph seems unrelated to the rest of the album.

Fort Chipewyan Photographs and HBC Journal

The photographic archive comes from Louise Rourke’s working papers used to illustrate her book “Land of the Frozen Tide,” published in London, 1928. Photographs are mounted on paper, many with typed captions. Some are mocked up with borders and decoration, or are marked up to silhouette individuals. Various notations in ink and pencil appear on most items. Most photographs are of Fort Chipewyan, Lake Athabasca, and Fond-du-Lac, SK. There are many photographs of boats on Lake Athabasca. Of note are two photographs accompanied by newspaper clippings.

  • Photograph of John Hornby in front of a cabin. Photograph is accompanied by an undated newspaper clipping describing the tragic discovery of Mr. Hornby, dead by starvation.
  • Photograph of two men captioned as the "factor" and "Mr. Mercredi, local boatbuilder." Accompanied by photograph clipped from a 1996 newspaper, captioned “Assembly of First Nations chief Ovide Mercredi looks toward aboriginal Korean War veteran Leon Fontaine from Manitoba Monday in Ottawa.”

Also included is an unpublished Hudson’s Bay Company fur trading post journal. Contains daily manuscript entries written by Louise Rourke's first husband, accountant Douglas Musgrave Rourke, who worked at Ft. Chipewyan. Entries are from between January 1, 1926 and January 7, 1927. The entries are preceded by a page of comments probably written by Louise Rourke. A carbon typescript biography of Louise Rourke and her second husband, Alwyn H.B. Dawson, is included as a loose sheet of paper.

Rourke, Louise