Showing 88125 results

Description
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

2826 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

1851 (Jun) from William Douglas Lane to Smithurst

Place: Lower Fort Garry

From: W[illiam Douglas] Lane

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Local courier (probably Hudson’s Bay Company courier)

Details: 1pp + integral address face

Notes: A short letter by William Douglas Lane, Postmaster at Lower Fort Garry, discussing the payment of bills, refunding of money, and receipt of a flute.

Lane, William Douglas

1851 (Mar) from Abraham Cowley to Rev. John Smithurst

Place: Red River Settlement

From: Reverend Abraham Cowley, Partridge Crop

To: Reverend John Smithurst

Details: 3pp

Notes: Partridge Crop was a missionary outpost on the northern reaches of Lake Manitoba, and was later renamed Fairford in 1851 by Bishop Anderson.

The outpost was on the left bank of the Partridge Crop River and was established by McNap for Winter trading with the Indigenous people. The lengthy letter from Cowley mentions topics such as the recent arrival of the bishop, his meeting of confirmation candidates and inspecting the school.

This letter would have travelled by canoe down Lake Winnipeg to the Red River.

Cowley, Abraham

1851 (May) from James Settee to Smithurst

Place: Lac La Ronge, C.M.L. Station

From: James Settee

To: The Reverend J. Smithurst,
Indian Settlement (crossed out),
Church Missionary House, Salisbury Square, London (crossed out),
Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire

Details: 3pp and integral address face

Notes: James Settee writes to Rev. Smithurst on a number of matters. He says that Thomas Cook brought Rev. Smithurst's last letter to him and told Settee that Rev. Smithurst was suffering badly from rheumatism. Settee says both he and his wife also suffer from rheumatism, which he blames on the cold climate. Settee is about to leave on a long journey to Norway House, and he mentions that the baptized Natives object to working on Sundays, but Settee feels that the portages would be impossible without the help of the Hudson's Bay Company boats and so they must work on the Sabbath to keep up. The mission at Lac La Ronge is doing well, and Settee hopes to writes to Rev. Smithurst again once he reaches Norway House.

While written in May, this letter has a cancellation for Sault Ste Marie, C.W. in September. The letter then made its way to Church Missionary House in London, England where it was then redirected to Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire.

Settee, James

1851 (May) from John H. Johnson to Bishop David Anderson via Smithurst

Place: Liverpool [England]

From: John H. Johnson

To: To The Right Rev’d D. Anderson, Lord Bishop of Rupert’s Land, North West America

Delivery: Forwarded by the Christian Missionary Society to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier

Details: 4pp + 4 newsletters + addressed envelope

Notes: Johnson writes to Bishop David Anderson to propose establishing an annual donation from St. Andrew's Church in Liverpool, England to the Christian Missionary Society in Rupert's Land. Johnson hopes to establish a link between the two groups and he hopes to see the initial donation of 5£ be surpassed in future years. Johnson intends that this letter be sent to Reverend John Smithurst and be "left open for his perusal as probably he may have some suggestions to make before sending it to you."

With his letter, he includes four (4) issues of “St. Andrew’s Monthly Paper.” Each issue consists of a single sheet of paper that measures only 14.5 x 12 cm when unfolded. Includes February, March, April, and May issues for 1851.

Interesting facts: St. Andrew's Church is located on Renshaw Street. Reverend T.C. Cowan is Minister. Issues are printed by Richard C. Scragg, Printer, 75, Renshaw Street. The District of St. Andrew's has a population of "about 6,000." Average monthly attendance at the Day School and Sunday School is approximately 250 each, and is broken down for Boys, Girls, and Infants.

1851 (Oct) from W. G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson's Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Revd John Smithurst, Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire [England]

Details: 2pp

Notes: In this letter, Mr. Smith writes to Rev. Smithurst to let him know that his packages have arrived in England and he will forward them by train.

Smith, William Gregory

1852 (Feb) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Wirksworth, Derbyshire (England)

Delivery: Great Britain mail

Details: 3pp + addressed envelope with postal marks (stamp removed)

Notes: Hudson’s Bay Company secretary W.G. Smith writes to say he is glad that Rev. Smithurst is enjoying himself upon his return to England, and discusses some outstanding balances due, including money from Henry Cook. He also mentions that he has a received large order from Rev. Cockran for blankets to be distributed to the Indians of his old mission.

Smith, William Gregory

1852 (Jan) from John Chapman to Rev. John Smithurst

Place: Salisbury Street, Ireland

From: John Chapman, Missionary at Middle Church

To: Reverend John Smithurst, 18 Salisbury Street, Ireland

Details: 2pp

Notes: Chapman thanks Smithurst for newspapers and of his letter detailing his route to New York. He also discusses the status of the congregation and the building of a new church.

Chapman, John

1853-55 Fort Simpson Journal

From the first report provided by the donor (see notes on accompanying materials below): "The Fort Simpson Journal contains the expected daily and routine entries on weather conditions, entertaining descriptions of the laborers and their occupations, and general comments on trading activities. The journal also contains a plethora of lengthy and intensely interesting entries describing specific activities and events hitherto unknown and unrecorded elsewhere."

The author of the Fort Simpson journal is William Henry McNeill (1801-1875). He does not name himself in the journal itself, but the donor has provided research identifying him through HBC Archives documents. McNeill took charge of Fort Simpson in 1851, was appointed Chief Factor in 1856, left from 1859-1861, before finally departing the fort in 1863. The town of Port McNeill on Vancouver Island is named for him.

The Hudson's Bay Company founded Fort Simpson, which eventually developed into Port Simpson and later Lax Kw'alaams. It is located on the coast of British Columbia.

McNeill, William Henry

1855 (Dec) from Edward Dewar to Townley

Place: Sandwich [now Windsor, ON]

From: Edward H. Dewar

To: Townley

Details: 3 pp

Notes: Rev. Dewar and Rev. Adam Townley were the editors of the "Churchman's Friend" magazine. In this letter, Rev. Dewar writes about editorial business, including subscribers, plans for articles, and printing.

Dewar, Edward H.

1855 (Dec) from Hogg to [Dewar and Townley]

Place: Munsee Town, Ekfrid P.O. [Ontario]

From: Henry C. Hogg

To: The Editors of the Churchman’s Friend

Details: 1pp. Someone has written in ink on the outside “Henry C. Hogg Esq. Dec/55” signed? underneath with the initials “AM” or “OM”

Notes: Edward Dewar and Adam Townley were the editors of the "Churchman's Friend" magazine. Mr. Hogg writes to them requesting a replacement copy as his subscription copy did not reach him.

1856 (Jan) from Edward Dewar to Townley

Place: Sandwich [now Windsor, ON]

From: Edward H. Dewar

To: Townley

Details: 3pp

Notes: Rev. Dewar and Rev. Adam Townley were co-editors of the “Churchman’s Friend” magazine. In this letter, Rev. Dewar writes about editorial matters, including the bursting of an envelope bound for Toronto, the decision to not include several articles in the coming issue, and the first complaint letter.

Dewar, Edward H.

1856 (Nov) from U. Goodman to unknown

Place: Newark, N.J. [New Jersey]

From: U. Goodman

To: unknown

Details: 4 pp

Notes: The unknown clergyman who received this letter ordered a bundle of 700 pamphlets of the second edition of a treatise arguing against "that evident power of the Devil, the public school system of America." The writer mentions a controversy involving the High School of Boston and another incident which he refers to as "the Denison case in the Mother Land."

1857 (Apr and May) from W.H. Taylor to Smithurst

Place: Saint James, Assiniboia [Red River Settlement]

From: W. H. Taylor

To: Rev. J. Smithurst, Harriston [Ontario]

Delivery: Postal system in Canada

Details: 16pp + addressed envelope with postal marks

Notes: A long and detailed letter from Reverend William Henry Taylor of Saint James parish along the Assiniboine River. Rev. Taylor writes to Rev. John Smithurst, updating him on the Red River Settlement. Much of the news has to do with repairing the extensive damage caused by the great flood in 1852. No one seems to be able to find enough workers for these repairs.

Mentioned are:
Father E.G. Gear, who broke his leg.
Mr. Robert Logan and Mrs. Logan, who are living near where the flax mill stood.
Old Mr. Pritchard and his wife died.
Their son, Sam Pritchard, teaches at St. Paul's school. His brother, Arelui (?), married.
Mr. Smith the Collector and Mr. Pruden are briefly mentioned.
Rev. Abraham Cowley and Mrs. Cowley are mentioned multiple times. Rev. Cowley now has a Seraphine instrument which Mrs. Cowley plays during services. Rev. Cowley also has detailed plans for the repair and renovation of his church.
Archdeacon James Hunter now has a barrel organ at the Rapids church (also known as St. Andrew's).
Thomas Cook is catechist at Nepowewin mission. Rev. Henry Budd says the work there is difficult.
Rev. Robert Hunt is at English River, also known as the Stanley mission near Lac la Ronge, and he is building an expensive and impressive church.
Rev. Henry Budd is at The Pas with a young Rev. Henry George, but plans to leave for Nepowewin permanently in the Spring.
Rev. William Stagg is struggling at Manitoba.
Rev. Kirkby is still assistant at St. Andrew's.
McDonald is at Islington (White Dog) but has health problems.
Watkins is leaving Fort George possibly for Cumberland.
Rev. William Mason has success in his work, but following the Bishop's visit, disease broke out and killed multiple Natives. Small pox is rampant among the Plains people in the area of Beaver Creek and Touchwood Hills.
The steam mill is producing excellent flour.
Political unrest as renewal of the Hudson's Bay Company's charter is being debated in England. A Mr. Kennedy and Donald Gunn have written and circulated a petition to the Canadian Legislature urging them to become involved.

Taylor, William Henry

1857 Copies of Despatches Regarding the Establishment of a Representative Assembly at Vancouver's Island

On the cover: Vancouver's Island-Return to an Address of the Honourable The house of Commons, dated 25 June 1857;-for "Copies of Extracts of any Despatches that have been received by Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies, on the subject of the Establishment of a Representative Assembly at Vancouver's Island."

Document is a compilation of Despatches, (original spelling), from the Right Hon. H. Labouchere, M.P., and from Governor Douglas, regarding correspondence relating to the establishment of a representative assembly at Vancouver's Island. All pages are typewritten, with minor foxing along the edges.

1857 Copy of a Letter & Memo from Chief Justice Draper

From the docket: “Hudson’s Bay Company. Copy of the Letter addressed by Mr. Chief Justice Draper to Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for the Colonies, bearing date the 6th day of May 1857, together with a Copy of the Memorandum therein referred to, relative to the Hudson’s Bay Company. (Mr. Labouchere.) Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 16 June 1857.”

This letter and enclosure request that British Parliament settle the question of the exact boundaries between the Hudson's Bay Company and the Province of Canada. From page 5: "The rights of the Hudson’s Bay Company, whatever they may be, are derived from the Crown; the Province of Canada has its boundaries assigned by the same authority; and now that it appears to be indispensable that those boundaries should be settled, and the true limits of Canada ascertained, it is to Her Majesty’s Government that the Province appeals to take such steps as in its wisdom are deemed fitting or necessary to have this important question set at rest.”

1857 (Jan) fragment from E.G. Gear to Smithurst

Place: Fort Snelling, Minnesota Territory

From: E.G. Gear

To: Rev & dear Brother [likely Rev. J. Smithurst]

Delivery: unknown

Details: Letter fragment. 4pp

Notes: While unsigned, this letter fragment is obviously authored by Rev. E.G. Gear, both from the address at Fort Snelling and from the unique handwriting. It was likely sent to Reverend John Smithurst. In this letter, Rev. Gear describes a riding accident where he broke his leg below the knee.

Gear, Ezekiel Gilbert

1857 (May) from Rev. Dewar to Townley

Place: Windsor

From: Edward H. Dewar

To: Townley

Details: 4 pp

Notes: Rev. Dewar and Rev. Adam Townley were the editors of the "Churchman's Friend" magazine. In this letter, Rev. Dewar scolds Rev. Townley for not submitting an article for the coming issue. Rev. Dewar points out that he has more than enough trouble from his church, where roof repairs cannot continue due to lack of money. He then relates how dismayed he is at the behaviour of two young women in his congregation who tried to run off to a Catholic convent. Rev. Dewar interfered and the ladies will no longer speak to him. He discusses strategy surrounding the upcoming Synod, criticizing the bishop's plans. In a postscript, he refers to two upcoming articles, one on "Spirit-rapping & Popery" and another which he intends to write as the start of a series about missionary life in Canada.

Dewar, Edward H.

1857 (Nov) from John Strachan to Arthur Palmer

Place: Toronto

From: John Toronto

To: Rev. A. Palmer

Details: 4pp

Notes: A copy of a private letter written by John Strachan, Bishop of Toronto to Rev. Arthur Palmer of Guelph, Canada West.

In this letter, Bishop Strachan responds to a letter written by Rev. Palmer which enclosed a letter sent to him by Mr. Geddes, a prominent member of the congregation at Elora. The bishop expresses anger and frustration with Reverend John Smithurst for abandoning his parish at Elora and refusing to tender his resignation. Mr. Geddes proposed a solution to the impasse, but the bishop gives detailed reasons why the proposal in unacceptable. Bishop Strachan plans to appoint a commission to investigate Rev. Smithurst's conduct.

The context of this letter is confusing, given that Bethune, Palmer, and Osler had already visited Elora and completed a report on Rev. Smithurst's absence dated October 22, 1857. Also, Rev. Smithurst indicated in his letter of November 3 to the Elora congregation that he had resigned. Perhaps a delayed postal delivery is to blame for this confusion.

Strachan, John

1857 (Nov) from Rev. Smithurst to Members of St. John’s in Elora

Place: Lea Hurst, Minto [Ontario]

From: John Smithurst

To: The C.W, Pewholders and other members of the St. Johns Ch Elora

Details: 4pp

Notes: This document is the rough draft of Reverend Smithurst’s letter of thanks to his congregation for their expression of kindness as he leaves Elora. Addressed to the Church Wardens, Pewholders, and congregation at large of St. John's in Elora, he cites the loss of his voice as one of the reasons for leaving. In a postscript, he says that the bishop [John Strachan] has offered him a compromise on the issue of wages still owing. By accepting this compromise, Smithurst wishes to protect the Church from scandal.

Smithurst, John

1857 (Oct) from Bethune, Palmer & Osler to the Bishop of Toronto

Place: Guelph [Ontario]

From: A.N. Bethune, Archdeacon of York; Arthur Palmer, Rector of Guelph & Rural Dean; F.L. Osler, Rector of Ancaster cum Dundas & Rural Dean

To: Bishop of Toronto

Delivery: unknown

Details: 4pp (secretarial copy)

Notes: A copy of the report submitted by Bethune, Palmer, and Osler on their inquiry into John Smithurst’s absence from his missionary post at Elora in the county of Wellington in the diocese of Toronto. John Strachan, Bishop of Toronto, requested these men investigate the allegation that Reverend Smithurst abandoned his post without permission. Churchwardens William Reynolds and J.S. Crossman in Elora confirmed that Rev. Smithurst had been largely absent since the end of April, sometimes remaining only a week at a time. The Churchwardens said Rev. Smithurst was unable “to read or preach in a tone of voice audible to all the members of his congregation; but admitted that his bodily health was on the whole vigorous.” Andrew Geddes confirmed the frequent absence of Rev. Smithurst, who is said to have taken up residence in the township of Minto. The report recommends the Bishop demand Rev. Smithurst's resignation.

Bethune, Alexander Neil

1857 (Oct) from George Whitaker to unknown

Place: Trinity College Toronto

From: George Whitaker

To: unknown

Details: Trinity College Toronto blue letterhead, one sheet of paper

Notes: A letter written by George Whitaker in his role as provost at Trinity College. He responds to a student who will receive his Master of Arts degree on November 12. The student also inquired about working for the college, to which Whitaker expresses interest.

Whitaker, George

1857 (Oct) from the congregation of St. John’s Church, Elora

Place: Elora [Ontario]

From: the Congregation of St. John's Church, Elora

To: Rev’d John Smithurst

Delivery: unknown

Details: 2pp

Notes: Upon Rev. John Smithurst’s resignation from St. John's Church in Elora, on the grounds of his inability to continue to perform the duties of his office, his congregation presented this petition to him in appreciation of his contributions to them and their community.

The petition is signed by 29 parishioners. Two surnames could not be deciphered.

William Reynolds, Church Warden
John S. Crossman, Church Warden

John Burke
William Carter
George Crane
F Dalby
Thomas Farrow
Andrew Geddes
Thomas Greathead
D. Henderroll(?)
Edwin Henry Kertland
George W. Kirkendall
John J. Marten
Valentine McKenzie
John M. McLean
Edw H. Newman
Richard Newman
Robert M. Newman
Walter P. Newman
Philip Pepler
James Reynolds
William Reynolds
Hugh Roberts
James L. Ross
David Smith
David Smith Jr.
Henry Smith

1858 Correspondence Relating to The Hudson's Bay Company

On the cover: Hudson's Bay Company-Return to an Address of the Honourable The House of Commons, dated 16 February 1858;-for, "Copies or Extracts of any Correspondence that has taken place between the Colonial Office and the Hudson's Bay Company, or the Government of Canada, in consequence of the Report of the Select Committee on the Affairs of the Company which sat in the last Session of Parliament."

1858 (Feb) from David Anderson to Smithurst

Place: Bishop’s Court [the name of the bishop's home in Red River]

From: David Rupertsland

To: Rev. J. Smithurst, Elora nr Guelph, Canada West

Delivery: Postal system in the U.S.A. and Canada

Details: 8pp on blue paper + addressed envelope with postal marks (stamp removed)

Notes: A friendly letter dated February 18th from David Anderson, Lord Bishop of Rupert’s Land, to Reverend John Smithurst. Postscript written February 27th.

Anderson, David

1858 Resolution: renewal of HBC rights

A document titled: "Resolutions to be proposed by the Hon. Mr. Loranger, in reference to Rupert's land, the Indian Territory and the affairs of the Hudson Bay Company." Printed by the Queen's Printer, S. Derbishire & G. Desbarats.

The six (6) resolutions propose a limited renewal of the Hudson's Bay Company's trading rights. The proposal is for the Canadian government to assume all territory the HBC claimed, allowing the company to retain only those lands on which it had built or otherwise improved. The HBC would not be eligible for compensation from lands lost.

1859 (Dec) from J.S. Lauder to Thompson

Place: Ottawa

From: J.S. Lauder

To: Thompson

Details: 4pp

Notes: J.S. Lauder is likely Reverend John Strutt Lauder of Christ Church in Ottawa, and later archdeacon of Ottawa. Lauder writes in response to a letter from his friend Thompson regarding a young man, Finlayson. Lauder regrets to say that he does not know the current whereabouts of Finlayson, but his investigations suggest that Finlayson has gone off to “sow his wild oats.”

A notation reads “J.S. Lauder Rec'd Dec 12/59.”

1859 (Feb) from David Anderson to Smithurst

Place: [Red River?]

From: David Rupertsland

To: The Rev J Smithurst, Lea Hurst, Harriston P.O., Minto, Wellington, Canada West

Delivery: Postal system in Canada.

Details: 2pp + addressed envelope with postal marks (stamp removed)

Notes: A short letter written by David Anderson, Lord Bishop of Rupert’s Land, to Reverend Smithurst with recent news.

Anderson, David

1859 (May) Letter from J. B. Robinson

Place: Toronto

From: J.B. Robinson

To: [Reverend C.E. Thomson]

Delivery: unknown

Details: 2pp

Notes: A short letter regarding the approaching Diocesan Synod and representatives from St. John’s Church in Elora.
Note on the back says “J.B. Robinson Esq. Read May 13/59.” While the recipient is not named, it is likely to be Reverend C. E. Thomson who led the Elora parish in 1859. J. B. Robinson is possibly Sir John Beverley Robinson, the noted lawyer and judge.

1859 (Nov & Dec) from William Henry Woollacott

Place: Hastenges Road Uper Canada [Hastings Road, Upper Canada]

From: William Henery Woollacott
From: Philip [surname unknown]

To: forther and Mother
To: Andrew

Notes: This sheet of paper has two letters written on it. The first letter is from a young man who signs his name "William Henery Woollacott." The second letter is from a man who signs his name "Philip."

In his letter, William writes to tell his parents that he and Mary reached Canada safely. William tells of the boat trip from Liverpool to New York and the difficult time he's had reaching Philip's home in Canada. He is very excited at the chance to buy his own farm. "P.S. we live in a plase called the shanty 16 feet square & I can tuch the ruff With my head it is bult with wood." [P.S. We live in a place called the shanty 16 feet square and I can touch the roof with my head. It is built with wood.]

In his letter, Philip is furious with Andrew for sending William to North America with no money, bedclothes, or supplies, and at the beginning of winter. They have already spent Philip's savings and they cannot find work. They have only potatoes and turnips to eat, and those will not last the winter. He tells Andrew to send money.

1860—1869

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1860 and 1869.

1861 September Notes - St. John's Elora

Notes for a sermon given at St. John's church in Elora (Canada West, later Ontario). Identified on the back as "September Notes."

The Reverend C.E. Thomson served at St. John's from 1857-1877, and is the likely author of this sermon.

The sermon begins with Luke XII.21 "So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God."

Thomson, C.E. (Charles Edward)

1862 (Nov) from Andrew Geddes to Smithurst

Place: C.L.O., Elora

From: Andrew Geddes

To: The Revd John Smithurst, Lea Hurst, Minto

Delivery: unknown

Details: 2pp + 1 pp (response in hand of Smithurst, and signed by him)

Notes: Correspondence from Andrew Geddes of the Crown Lands Office (C.L.O.) to Rev. Smithurst regarding the sale of two lots of land in the county of Minto. The lots stand in the name of David M. Bridgeford or Bridgford, and so Mr. Geddes asks Rev. Smithurst for further information. Mr. Geddes also updates Rev. Smithurst on the recovery of Mr. R. Caldwell, who nearly died of illness.

Rev. Smithurst responds on the same sheet of paper. He does not date his response, which presumably means that it is a rough draft of the actual letter he sent to Mr. Geddes.

Rev. Smithurst’s response explains that there is no such person as David W. Bridgford. John Bridgford had already purchased three lots in the Minto land sale but used the name of his dead son to buy additional land. John Bridgford could not transfer ownership of these additional lots without revealing his fraud. Bridgford tried to sell the land to a Mr. Thomas Dalley Senior, but Mr. Dalley refused to pay until Bridgford’s ownership could be tested. Later, Mr. Dalley split the two lots between his sons, William and Thomas Junior. William has never resided on his parcel and has tried to sell it without success. Thomas Jun. has cleared land and put up buildings. Rev. Smithurst believes Thomas Jun. would be entitled to squatter's rights.

Geddes, Andrew

1863 (Jan) from Adam Townley to Bishop Strachan

Date: January 1863, Epiphany

Place: Paris, C.W. [Canada West]

From: Adam Townley

To: The Honble and Right Reverend The Lord Bishop of Toronto

Details: 4 pp

Notes: The rough draft of a letter written by Reverend Townley to John Strachan, Bishop of Toronto. In the letter, Rev. Townley respectfully asks for a promotion.

Townley, Adam

1864 & 1865 Ordinance for the Budget of the Colony of British Columbia

Title: British Columbia. Anno Vicesimo Nono. No. 11. An Ordinance granting a Supplemental Supply of Thirty-two Thousand Four Hundred and Fifty-six Pounds, Seven Shillings, and Five Pence, out of the General Revenue of the Colony of British Columbia and its Dependencies, to the service of the years One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty-four and five respectively.

Details the request to the British Government for additional funds for the running of the Colony of British Columbia.

1864 HBC employment contract

This fill-in-the-blank contract is for employment with Hudson's Bay in North America in the capacity of labourer for a term of five years. It is signed by Andrew Groundwater in the Parish of Orkney & Shetland.
Printed in lower left of contract: 500 - 12 - 62.

1866 Ordinance for the Yearly Budget

Title: British Columbia. Anno Vicesimo Nono. Victoriae Reginae. No. 4. An Ordinance to apply the sum of Seven Hundred and Twenty Two Thousand One Hundred and Fourteen Dollars and Five Cents, out of the General Revenue of the Colony of British Columbia and its Dependencies, to the service of the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty Six.

Details the request for money for the year from the British Government in order to run the Colony of British Columbia. Back page lists the salaries of government officials, as well as the cost for services.

1870—1879

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1870 and 1879.

1871 HBC deed poll

A document titled: "Deed Poll by the Governor and Company of Hudson's Bay, for conducting their trade in North America, and for defining the rights and prescribing the duties of their officers." Printed by Sir Joseph Causton & Sons, London, United Kingdom.

From notes provided by the donor: "An internal document outlining the rights and duties of H.B.C. officers, outlines the number of Chief Factors, Factors, Chief Traders and Junior Chief Traders, the distribution of shares, and many other details."

1873 (Apr) Letter from Alexander Neil Bethune, Bishop of Toronto

Place: Cobourg

From: A.N. Toronto

To: Mr .Thomson

Details: 4pp

Notes: A letter written April 12, 1873 in Cobourg, Ontario by "A. N. Toronto," who is Alexander Neil Bethune, Bishop of Toronto. The bishop writes to Reverend C.E. Thomson to advise him on a special service for baptisms, and some other church matters. Mr. Rowsell is mentioned with regards to exposing tracts. The bishop goes on to say that he plans on traveling from Guelph by train on Monday, June 2nd for the purposes of performing confirmations and laying the cornerstone for the new church.

Bethune, Alexander Neil

1873 (Jul) Letter from Alexander Neil Bethune, Bishop of Toronto

Place: Collingwood

From: A.N. Toronto

To: Mr. Thomson

Details: 2pp

Notes: A letter written July 29, 1873 in Collingwood, Ontario by "A. N. Toronto," which is the signature used by Alexander Neil Bethune, Bishop of Toronto. While the recipient is not named, this letter appears to be in response to "1873 - Letter to Bishop," a letter dated July 23 and which is attributable to Rev. C. E. Thomson.

Bethune, Alexander Neil

1873 (Jul) Letter to Bishop

Place: Elora

From: [Rev. C.E. Thomson]

To: Possibly addressed to Bishop of Toronto, Alexander Bethune

Delivery: unknown

Details: One sheet of paper, embossed.

Notes: A letter, marked "Copy," written July 23, 1873 in Elora. The recipient of the letter is likely the Bishop of Toronto, Alexander Neil Bethune. Although the signature is illegible, the probable author is Reverend C. E. Thomson. Various notes and numbers written on the back. Rev. Thomson writes that he would prefer Thorold, but will take Newmarket for the following Sunday. He also relates his opinion on the behaviour of Mr. Butler, who "has forgotten himself since he came to Fergus, but not at Elora so far as I know." Thomson asks that Bishop Bethune consider his remarks confidential.

Thomson, C.E. (Charles Edward)

1880 (Oct) from F.D. Fauquier to Townley

Place: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario

From: F.D. Algoma

To: Townley

Details: 4 pp

Notes: A letter from F.D. Fauquier, Bishop of Algoma, to Reverend Adam Townley. In this short note, the bishop thanks Rev. Townley for his donation to the mission fund. Bishop Fauquier also congratulates Rev. Townley on returning to a parish that he previously served.

Fauquier, F.D. (Frederick Dawson)

1887 HBC deed poll

A document titled: "Deed Poll by the Governor and Company of Hudson's Bay, for conducting their trade in North America, and for defining the rights and prescribing the duties of their officers, 1871. Amended by Shareholders, June 27th, 1876; June 24th, 1879." Printed by Sir Joseph Causton & Sons in London, United Kingdom.

From notes provided by the donor: "An updated version of the Deed Poll issued in 1871, outlining the rights and duties of H.B.C. officers, outlines the number of Chief Factors, Factors, Chief Traders and Junior Chief Traders, the distribution of shares, and many other details.

1889, August 25 - Letter to Alf

Place: Byron, Ontario

From: Miss Marion Griffith

To: Alf/ T.A. Patrick, M. D. Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N. W. T

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + envelope, note on envelope "214," red wax seal

Notes: Marion writes to her fiance about her worry regarding her church choir's singing, which she though "did not sound well." She writes, "I really hope it did not sound as badly to the congregation as it did to me." She then tells Alf that she would be happy to pick out clothes for him and she hopes that she will "choose material to suit [him]." Marion encourages Alf in his efforts in Saltcoats, telling him that "do not even think of getting discourage Alf." She continues, "you can keep house almost as cheaply as you can board" but she warns him, "you know I am to assist furnishing our house." She then agrees that Alf must take the exam that he mentioned in his last letter although it "will be quite an expense, but a necessary one."

1889, Dec 14 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron [Ontario]

From: Marion [Griffith]

To: Alf / T.A. Patrick, M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 12 pp + envelope, note on envelope “No. 232,” green wax seal

Notes: Marion writes her weekly letter to her fiance, Alf [Dr. Thomas A. Patrick]. Marion shares the progress she and her sister Annie are making in preparing for Marion's marriage to Alf and both sisters moving to Saltcoats. Marion's family does not know that Annie plans on accompanying her. Annie ran into Alf's brother Rick at the drugstore in London, ON where he works. Financial matters take up a large part of the letter, with Marion sharing Alf's worry over financial security, while also offering him encouragement. Annie and Marion are pleased with their growing herd of sheep, but Marion worries that she will have to sell them soon for the cash. Marion tells of trouble in the church parish, which distresses her especially as her father is one of the causes. She is also dismayed that her father appears to make no effort to repay a loan to her Grandpa. She closes the letter wondering when she should tell her Grandpa that she is leaving, and she wishes Alf a Merry Xmas. In a postscript, she worries about both her and Annie leaving their mother when their Grandpa's health is so poor.

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1889, Dec 20 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron, Ontario

From: Marion [Griffith]

To: Alf / T.A. Patrick, M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + envelope, note on envelope “No. 233”

Notes: Marion writes to her fiance, Alf [Dr. Thomas A. Patrick]. She has been busy in preparations for Christmas. Alf's parents invited her and her sister Annie to spend Xmas [Christmas] evening with them and a few friends. She is pleased and surprised to be invited, although she worries that they will be an imposition as they are unable to arrange a ride home for themselves. Marion anticipates talking with Alf's brother Rick, as they get along well. Marion tells of how pleased Annie was to receive her own letter from Alf, which also pleases Marion. Writing later, Marion tells of how she stayed at home with her Grandpa rather than attending evening church service. He is very lonely and she is glad to play for him and read aloud to him.

Marion received an early Christmas gift from Annie: a cup and saucer for her and a moustache cup for Alf. Marion "was surprised when I saw the cups as it was decided we would do without presents ourselves in order to have a family photograph during the holidays." Marion wishes Alf a belated birthday, a Merry Xmas, and Happy New Year. In a postscript she writes that she has no objections to Alf's cousin travelling to Birtle [Manitoba] to be a witness at their wedding.

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1889, Dec 9 – Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats

From: Alf [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Miss Marion Griffith, Byron, Ontario, Canada

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + envelope, note on envelope “No. 253”

Notes: Alf writes his weekly letter to Marion, with many details of his cash flow as he continues to build a stock of drugs and other items for his medical practice. He names a number of clients who owe him money for medical services but are “never likely to pay me.” He hired “Young McGrath of Crescent Lake” to stuff his deer’s head. He mentions news from his mother and his brother, Richard. Alf tells Marion he intends to write his parents with news of their marriage plans [as discussed in his letter of November 30, 1889]. He continues to be in disagreement with his father and believes the roots of the conflict lie in his talk of marriage. Alf coaches Marion to act “non-committed and oblige” when she visits them. “Re Xmas presents – I concur with you. Would like you to get photographed before you leave home for home here.”

Regarding their plans for a wedding, Alf writes that he is unsure exactly when the marriage could happen. He writes "don't know where the money is to come from in the meantime. As soon as I get this stock on the shelf I'll be in better position to know when we can get married Marion. For after all we can not marry without money." He later states "I expect very little professional work between now and April."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1889, May 20 - Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats, Assiniboia

From: Alf, T.A.P [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Miss Marion Grittith, Byron, Ontario, Canada

Delivery: registered Canadian Post, via London, postmarks

Details: 18 pp + envelope

Notes: Alf writes to his fiance about a "cheeky" visiting doctor in Saltcoats who attempted to upstage Alf as he was checking on patients. This annoyed Alf greatly and he writes "I saw the fellow was trying to bluff me and to impress me with his wonderful self so I said - 'Well since you're here and a married man and have means, and a horse and rig, you'd better conclude to stay right here in this great country. There are much better openings here than in crowded Ontario. It will hardly pay you to stay six months in a place as a married man can not flit about very well. Bring your wife and your horse and your means up here and settle down. It will pay you even to leave your paying practice in Ontario." He continues that he is "getting an ad eumdem gradum from the University of Manitoba in June." Then, he writes that he has patients too poor to pay him work on his homestead, ploughing the land to help Alf with his settlement duties. He states "this little discourse enabled my friend to see that I have taken deep root in Saltcoats."

Alf, then, informs Marion that he is "laying a good solid foundation for future success here and if we are only married I would have no fear of any rival M.D. but as it is I feel incomplete." He informs her of his plans on paying off some debts, getting his diploma of the C. P. S. of Ontario, renting a house, and paying her fare down to Saltcoats so that they could be wed. Part of these plans, Alf informs her, is to register following the Medical Act that will come in force in October with his Manitoba degree and his Western University degree. Though he also has to finish his Ontario qualifications.

1889, Nov 22 – Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats, Assa. N.W.T.

From: Alf [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Miss Marion Griffith, Byron, Ontario, Canada – Middlesex Co.

Delivery: Canada Post, via London, postmarks

Details: 6 pp + envelope, note on envelope “No. 250,” red wax seal with stamped initials “TAP”

Notes: In one of his regular letters to Marion, Alf details the purchases, which were largely of second hand items, that he made to furnish his rented house. He also apologizes to Marion and refers to someone who “means well and does not doubt you but feared you might be disappointed” with what Alf can provide as a home. He also tells of a heated argument he had with Mr. Lockhart over the man’s outstanding bill. Alf has waited six months and only received one quarter of the amount due. He also mentions writing a letter to Rick on his announcement of conversion to God.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1889, Nov 30 - Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats, Assa.

From: Alf [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Miss Marion Griffith, Byron, Ontario, Canada – Middlesex C.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + receipt + envelope, note on envelope “No. 252,” red wax seal with stamped initials “TAP”

Notes: "My dear Marion – Four years ago to-night we “plighted our troth” to each other. How I wish I were with you tonight that we might rejoice together. The intervening four years have been a long time in rolling by – and must have been trying indeed to your patience. My dear faithful Marion. When Nov. 30th 1890 is here I trust it will find us a faithful, loving, staid happy married pair – man and wife. Certainly much that we desired four years ago has been transferred from desire to realization. What we both now so particularly desire will, I trust, soon be ours to enjoy. God has truly been good to us during the four years past, Marion. May we be much more deserving of his goodness hereafter."

Alf believes he and Marion can finally marry. He makes detailed plans for Marion to travel to Birtle, Manitoba on Saturday, January 15 where he will meet her.

Included with the letter is a receipt for T.A. Patrick's payment to the High Court of Canada, Canadian Order of Foresters.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1889, Sep 14 - Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats, Assiniboia

From: Alf, T.A.P. [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Miss Marion Griffith, Byron, Ontario, Canada

Delivery: registered Canadian Post, via London, postmarks

Details: 11pp + envelope, note on envelope “240” and “246”

Notes: Alf tells of a party he attended, an abscessed knee he treated, his good opinion of Bishop Anson of Qu’ Appelle, and an eyebrow he sutured. Alf enjoys teaching and is pleased to also be paid for it. He is unhappy at the unexpectedly high taxidermy bill for the mounting of a pelican. Alf had news of the death by consumption of his cousin, Mary Ann Hobbs, and it is expected that her father and sister will also pass soon. Alf has arranged to rent a house owned by Mr. Fisher, with plans to live in one bedroom while sub-renting part to Mr. and Mrs. Lauder and part to Mr. Cumming. A suit Marion selected for him arrived and Alf is very pleased with it. Writing again later, on returning from Crescent Lake to treat Mr. Kent, Alf believes the man to die soon and will not be charging the family as they are in financial straits.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1890, Feb 8 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron, Ontario

From: Marion [Griffith] and M.J. Griffith

To: Alf / T.A. Patrick M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + envelope banded in black; note on envelope “No. 241;” and a page banded in black

Notes: Marion writes to her fiance, Alf [Dr. T.A. Patrick]. She is recovering after being ill for several days. She is otherwise making progress on the packing to move to Saltcoats and marry Alf.

A second item in the envelope is a sheet of lined paper, folded in half, first page banded in black. It is a letter from Marion's mother, Mrs. M.J. Griffith, to her soon-to-be son-in-law. She and her husband, James, give their blessing to the upcoming marriage.

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1890, Jan 10 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron [Ontario]

From: Marion [Griffith]

To: Alf / T.A. Patrick, M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 10 pp + envelope, note on envelope “No. 236”

Notes: Marion writes to her fiance, Alf [Dr. Thomas A. Patrick]. Her Grandpa is doing poorly. He surprised Marion by giving her and her sister Annie a gift of $175.00 the morning after speaking with his doctor. She finishes writing the letter while in Strathroy. She received Alf's photograph and is surprised that he grew a moustache. Marion and Annie continue to make plans to move to Saltcoats in the near future.

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1890, Jan 15 – Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats [North West Territories]

From: Alf [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Miss Marion Griffith, Byron, Ontario, Canada – Middlesex Co.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 7 pp + envelope; note on envelope “No. 258;” broken, black matchstick- size substance seals envelope

Notes: Alf writes his weekly letter to his fiance, Marion. "Am not at all well yet. Though better than yesterday. Practising medicine and being sick are not very compatible with each other. This influenza epidemic has been hard on medical practitioners. Dr. Faford of St. Boniface near Winnipeg died last week and Saturday’s Free Press (Manitoba) tells us that old Dr. Ferguson of Winnipeg is, dying, or at least near unto death."

He has been asking around to estimate the cost of the marriage and lists prices for the ring, license, Parson's fee, and fare to Birtle. After detailing financial concerns, Alf asks, "Can we not then be married in Birtle on Saturday February 22nd – five weeks from to-day?" He writes that "this will be cheapest and if mean to be married as February we must consider what is cheapest."

He writes that he is "in a bad fix for need of bottles. He had ordered some from Detroit, but they were delayed at Portage La Prairie. He writes "the last medicine I stuck in a Worcestershire sauce bottle and the medicine before that in a shoe-blacking bottle."

He further writes of receiving two papers called "Farm and Storm" and the Regina Leader.

Alf comments on the kindness of Marion's grandfather for gifting money to her and her sister, Annie. As to her surprise that he grew a moustache, he comments, "My moustache was not worth mentioning.." He then asks what bedding she needed him to purchase for her and states that he "will get dishes from Buchanan and Co. so that we can begin housekeeping at once." But he ensures her that he "will borrow them and not buy any till you come."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1890, Jan 18 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron, Ont.

From: Marion [Griffith]

To: Alf / T. A. Patrick, M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 4 pp + envelope; note on envelope “No. 237”

Notes: In her weekly letter to her fiance, Alf, Marion gives an account of her grandfather's rapid decline in health. Numerous family members come and go to take shifts and sit with him as he suffers through worsening "bad spells." Dr. Woodruff can do nothing more for his patient. Reverend Evans Davis is sent for. Marion writes, "I understand now Alf why it is best that we did not go to Saltcoats sooner. All is for the best, but we cannot think so sometimes." She finishes the letter, "Yours in sorrow, Marion."

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1890, Jan 27 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron [Ontario]

From: Marion [Griffith]

To: Alf / T. A. Patrick, M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 4 pp + envelope; note on envelope “No. 239,” envelope is bordered in black

Notes: Marion writes to her fiance, Alf. Her Grandpa died at 3 p.m. She describes it as a relief as he suffered so much.

As Alf asked to set their wedding date as Saturday, February 22 in his letter, Marion explains that it is too soon for her to be ready to travel to Birtle and Saltcoats. She asks Alf if February 28th would work as a compromise.

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1890, Jan 29 – Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats, N.W.T.

From: Alf [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Miss Marion Griffith, Byron, Middlesex, Ont[ario]

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + envelope; note on envelope “No. 260”

Notes: In a letter to his fiance, Marion Griffith, Alf [Dr. T.A. Patrick] describes traveling across open prairie in winter to reach sick patients. Alf, Mr. Paulger, and Mr. Boake (liveryman) traveled more than eight hours to reach the ill Mrs. Paulger. Upon returning to Saltcoats, Alf found a telegram calling him to Kinbrae to treat the wife of Mr. William Rowland. After spending a mere six hours in Saltcoats, Alf and Mr. Boake set out at midnight to reach Mrs. Rowland. After more than seven hours they reached Churchbridge, where they rested their team of horses and ate breakfast. They finally reached Mrs. Rowland at 4 p.m. to find her suffering from typhoid fever. Returning to Saltcoats took less time as Mr. Rowland was able to set the men on a more direct route to Churchbridge. Alf chose to take the Friday freight train from Churchbridge back to Saltcoats. Along the way, the train stopped and waited as Alf treated the child of the section foreman at Bredenbury.

Much of the rest of the letter concerns financial matters, including an explanation of fines applied to wood cut illegally from government lands.

Writing at a later time, Alf acknowledges receiving Marion's letter in which she describes her grandfather's worsening health.

Writing a day later, Alf is in receipt of the mourning envelope containing news of Marion's grandfather's death. He expresses his condolences before approving of Marion's suggestion that she and her sister Annie begin their journey to Saltcoats on February 28. Alf then worries further about financial matters, "For I feel sorry that in asking you to marry me I ask you to marry a man whose future is mortgaged." But he looks forward to their marriage, writing, "Do not hope or expect any near approach to perfection in this future husband of yours, Marion. He has many faults but it can truthfully be said that he is always very much better when his Marion influences him."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1890, Jan 31 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron, Ontario

From: Marion [Griffith]

To: Alf / T.A. Patrick M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + envelope, banded in black; note on envelope “No. 240;” obituary newspaper clipping for Mr. John Stephens.

Notes: Marion writes to her fiance, Alf [Dr. T.A. Patrick]. Marion describes the funeral arrangements for her grandfather, John Stephens. She repeatedly mentions how tired she feels and how she is suffering from headaches. Marion and her sister, Annie, continue their preparations for moving to Saltcoats, with the encouragement and support of their family.

She mentions that Annie will purchase the wedding ring for Alf and discusses the different shoes that she purchased. She plans to add the moccasins Alf had bought for her to her supply.

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1890, Jan 8 – Letter to Marion

Place: Saltcoats

From: Alf [Thomas A. Patrick]

To: Marion / Miss Griffith, Byron, Ontario, Canada

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 5 pp + envelope, note on envelope “No. 257”

Notes: In his weekly letter to his fiancé, Marion Griffith, Alf comments that many people in the community are sick with a cold. Twelve “half-breeds” and some “Indians” from Fort Pelly are in Saltcoats to stock up on provisions. Alf made a deal with Chief Cotè to have his two deer hides tanned with the hair on. Alf plans on using the tanned hides for bedroom rugs.

“It’s ‘again the law’ to sell Pain Killer Price’s Extracts and several other things of this kind to Indians or halfbreeds. Those here to-day took advantage of ignorance of that fact. They got a pound of sweet mitre from me and ginger and Price’s Flavoring Extracts from Mr. Hallett clerk at Buchanan & Co.’s. I expect they are having a great old drunk tonight on these delicious beverages. Hallett and I are both liable to a fine if our ignorance of the law does not excuse us.”

Writing later, Alf tells of a busy few days of sick calls. Two people were stricken with convulsions and one with influenza. The shipment of drugs he ordered from Detroit did not arrive and is stuck in Customs at Portage La Prairie. “They have been ordered and paid for since Nov. 11th and so will be a long time coming indeed.”

Again writing later, Alf’s handwriting deteriorates as he is exhausted from a day of travelling between sick patients and now has influenza himself. He tells Marion that her travel plan suggestion, which apparently involves her taking the train to Portage La Prairie, is unwise. He wants to meet her in Birtle and be married on a Tuesday.

He ends the letter “[w]ith headache and weeping, sneezing nose and backache and sickness and just haste, I am. Yourownloving Alf.”

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1897, Dec 1 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, N.W.T.

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. Marion G. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp on North West Territories Legislative Assembly letterhead, watermarked, & an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes his letter to his wife, Marion, while sitting at the Statute Labor Ordinance. Letting his wife know that she might see it in the Regina Leader, he states that he got another "shot at the Manitoba and North Western Railway Company." He then writes that he has to sit in Assembly every night for the next week. He inquires about the children and whether they liked the gift he sent to them. Ending his note he states that he "gave notice of my Village Ordinance today."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1897, Dec 2 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, N.W.T.

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. [Marion] Patrick, Yorkton

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp on North West Territories Legislative Assembly letterhead, watermarked, & an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes on of his frequent letters to his wife, Marion, from the Assembly informing her that he had just got his Manitoba and North Western Railway resolution passed. He ends stating"the Windsor Ball tonight."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1897, Dec 3 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, N.W.T.

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. [Marion] Patrick, Yorkton

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp on North West Territories Legislative Assembly letterhead, watermarked, & an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick informs his wife, Marion, in one of his frequent letters that he spoke on the second reading of his Prairie and Forest Fire Bill, which met with some opposition but passed. He also mentions that the Windsor Ball the night before was a success and that he has been reading compliments regarding his Fire Bill. He states that one was "an opinion or rather an expression of hope that I will soon be a member of the Government."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1897, Nov 19 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, N.W.T.

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 9 pp, one sheet of paper is North West Territories letterhead & envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife, Marion Patrick, while he waits for the House to open as Government is in council. He states that the Railway Committee's report will not be addressed until Monday. Unfortunate as Patrick had taken under his wing a Mr. Ferraro, a Hungarian delegate who had visited Yorkton, and a Mr. Forslund of the C.P.R. Land Department who had come to visit the Assembly. Unhappy with the Hungarians' location near Yorkton, Mr. Forslund gave most of them land grants. Mr. Ferraro decided to move to Edmonton.

Patrick further writes of the Speaker's dinner that night where one of the attendees is supposed to be the Hon. Clifford Sifton, Minister of the Interior. There is also an upcoming "Windsor Assembly Ball" to honour the Assembly members. Patrick finishes his first letter with "Mr. Haultain has arrived. The Speaker takes the chair."

He begins a new letter in the afternoon while waiting for a sleigh to take him to the House, expressing his worry about his family and his friends the Nelsons and the Christies. He advises that the children avoid Mrs. Head, regardless of the precautions she takes, and that the should be taken out for a walk everyday. He then jokes of his lack of progress in learning to waltz despite having lessons from Mrs. Hayes, the Librarian, Mrs Newlands, wife of the Registrar of Land Titles, and Miss Nimmins of the Normal School. Patrick reports that he finished drafting a report for the Select Committee on Railways and must begin drafting a Village Ordinance.

Patrick writes later that evening that Clifford Sifton will not be in attendance at the ball and again on Saturday morning he writes to inform his wife that the members of the assembly were invited to Commissioner Herchmen's home to meet Mr. Sifton. Later still on Sunday, he continues his letter to comment on the new Government's need to prepare legislation following the election.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1897, Nov 3 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: Alf [T.A. Patrick]

To: Mrs. Marion G. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp of North West Territories letterhead + envelope

Notes: A short letter from Alf to his wife, Marion. He writes that she "acted very sensibly in not adding the M.L.A. to my address" and he "thinks it would be well to avoid doing so always." He then writes of his successful speech in the Legislative Assembly, which the newspapers the Regina Standard and the Regina Leader covered. He finishes his letter stating that he will move a motion that day regarding the Manitoba and North Western Railway.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1897, Nov 5 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, N.W.T.

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 2 pp on North West Territories Legislative Assembly letterhead + envelope

Notes: T.A Patrick writes one of his frequent letters to his wife, stating how busy he has been in the last week due to the extra work created by his select committee on the Manitoba and North Western Railway. He was invited to a ball at the Governor's and bought a new pea jacket of good quality. He mentions sending 140 copies of the Regina Leader through the constituency (of Yorkton). Writes of needing to work on a Health Ordinance that night and his interview with the district engineer about public works the next day.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

19 performance photos; scrapbook page with 6 performance photos

photo 1-2: Performances in 2006.
photo 3-4: Cantonese Opera musicians, actors and actresses group photos on April 30, 2006.
photo 5: Musicians performed in 2006.
photo 6: Performance in 2007.
photo 7: A musician performance in 2007.
photo 8-18: 11 performance photos with unknown dates.
photo 19: Ox (2009) Chinese New Year banquet, singing in honour of seniors.
Scrapbook page with 6 performance photos in 2007.

1900, Apr 11 – Business Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp on North West Territories lined letterhead, watermarked, & an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes his wife a business letter, stating that he has enclosed within the letter:
"1. Dominion Express Co.'s order for $12

  1. Authority for Mr. Patrick - that is Jack [T.A. Patrick's brother] - to make entry for Dominion Lands on behalf of Auton Georg Flegel
  2. Auton George Flegel's answers to certain questions and declaration as to their truth
  3. Edward Fitzgerald's letter to me of 3rd instant."

He then instructs his wife to cash the Express order and to give Jack $10 to go to the Land Office with the enclosed documents in order to "make entry for this land as soon as he can." Jack was to send the "interim homestead receipt to Mr. Fitzgerald."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Apr 11 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp on North West Territories lined letterhead, watermarked, & an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife that the House has adjourned for the week and he is trying to catch up on work and prepare for the last part of the Session. He mentions writing the business letter to Marion [his wife] and informs her that he sent her "stray dry goods in another envelope." He also informs her that Mr. Fitzgerald [from the business letter] will contact her gain with more money to purchase more land, which T.A. Patrick tells her to get Jack [his brother] to do.

He ends his letter stating that "I take dinner with Meyers tonight at the Windsor and hope to paste in part of my "Honored" lakes."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Apr 12 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 4 pp; paper watermarked with crown, crest, and “Antique Parchment Note Paper;” & an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife that he is pleased that George [his brother] has sold eight cattle. Patrick thinks that they can afford to keep the rest of the cattle. He asks his wife to apply the money "on notes coming due at the bank." The Brome Grass seed, which Patrick mentioned in his last letter, was profitable for both Patrick and George. This money is to go towards payments on accounts around town.

He writes that he "got the registered letter. It's another homestead affair. I sent it back to Grenfell [to Mr. Fitzgerald from the business letter] for corrections. When it reaches you deal with it as with the others."

He then writes that he has enclosed the key to his drawer within his brother Dick's safe. He asks his wife to "get the certificate of title for block 18 Yorkton. I wish to get the survey or town plot registered. Don't forget this."

Patrick mentions going to Moose Jaw on Saturday to visit friends and that his son George's picture "has many admirers." He asks if the mill is going up and how the girls are getting on in school. He asks if they are forgetting their German.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Apr 17 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 4 pp; second piece of paper is blank; paper watermarked with crown, crest, and “Antique Parchment Note Paper;” & an envelope

Note: Patrick writes to his wife that he is sorry that the "Village adjourned its meeting for it can't hold another one legally as the town of Yorkton began to exist yesterday.” He then tells his wife that he is anxious to "see the Enterprise to see if the proclamation was published" and asks who the candidates are for the mayoralty and for Councillors.

Patrick states that "Billy Miller has no moral or legal claim on the Hudson and Co. and the policy was issued no delay of mine affected the matter in the least. Mr. Bull is merely playing a game which will reach on himself." He inquires if Jack [his brother] can discretely find out who will be appointed into the Public Administratorship of Yorkton as the last Administrator had passed away. Near the end of his letter he mentions that he wrote a letter to [J.A.] Magee for the next Enterprise [newspaper].

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Apr 20 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp on lined North West Territories letterhead & an envelope

Notes: T. A. Patrick informs his wife that he is enclosing information for his brother George regarding their Brome seed along with a cheque for $264.56. He then asks his wife to cash the cheque and give his brother $139.56, stating the "he and I will straighten out the matter on my return." He also asks his wife to pay part of this money onto accounts, particularly that of Barney Pallom.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Apr 25 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 3 pp on paper watermarked with crown, crest, and “Antique Parchment Note Paper;” & an envelope

Notes: T.A. writes one of his frequent letters to his wife that he has work "to do today as chairman of the "Cooked Accounts" Committee reporting the refusal of Mr. Bennett to attend the Committee when requested to attend and give evidence" and Patrick writes of moving for an order to compel Mr. Bennett's attendance.

He then mentions letters from his mother and sister, Maud, and meeting with the new boiler inspector. He states that "the estimates were brought down yesterday Yorkton District fares fairly well - about $3500 altogether." He continues that "this will do quite a little to improve our roads and bridges." Additionally, he states that he has sent 14 letters to the district "advising people as to the grants for particular works."

Patrick finishes his letter writing "I think my letter to Mr. Magee [from the last letter] settled a good deal of his chatter. I wonder if Mrs. Magee will come to see you [Patrick's wife] again."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Apr 27 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 3 pp on paper watermarked with crown, crest, and “Antique Parchment Note Paper;” & an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes one of his frequent letters to his wife, Marion. He writes that the Budget Debate is on and that Bennett and Sifton spoke the day before. He writes that he thinks "it likely the apposition will move an amendment in which case [Patrick] may speak to both motion and amendment."

He indicates that Marion will have seen Patrick's edition of The Standard. He states that "at my suggestion the Queen's Printer who appeared before the Committee on Public Accounts was to write me who printed these accounts saying that he would be afforded an opportunity by the Committee to explain the cause of an error. Therein the Queen's Printer instead wrote him a letter requiring him to furnish an explanation. Well he got mad. He was also angry about the motion respecting the Select Committee."

Patrick finishes his letter stating that "he [Mr. Bennett] appeared before the Public Accounts Committee yesterday and I examined him."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Apr [5] – Letter to Marion

Place: Unusually, the letter is undated and does not include the location of the writer, but the envelope is postmarked Regina

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked April 6 and April 7

Details: 1 pp on North West Territories lined letterhead, watermarked, & an envelope

Notes: In a short letter to his wife, Marion, T.A. Patrick expresses his pleasure that his daughter Edith is taking her medicine without complaint. He writes "I enjoyed witnessing the opening of the Manitoba Legislation. Gillis and I had seats on the floor of the House."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, Mar 2 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked Regina April 2.

Details: 1 pp on North West Territories lined letterhead, watermarked, & an envelope

Notes: Patrick writes while sitting in the Legislative chamber. He tells his wife, Marion, that he introduced the petition to incorporate Yorkton this day. He also reports that there is no election in the immediate future, as the present Legislature will live out its full term.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1900, May 1 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 2 pp on paper watermarked with crown, crest, and “Antique Parchment Note Paper;” & an envelope

Notes: T.A. writes a very short letter to his wife. He apologizes for some difficulties that have arisen over a steer. He also writes that "happily bill passed last night" and that the House will wind up its business in a week.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1901, May 11 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, Assa.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1pp on lined North West Territories letterhead, watermarked “Old Hampden;” and an envelope

Notes: T. A. Patrick writes one of his frequent letters to his wife, Marion. He writes that he should have stayed in Yorkton for a few more days as the House had adjourned before he had arrived. There is still much work to be done "as many bills have been introduced, and these require consideration." He finishes his letter by mentioning the cold weather.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1901, May 16 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, Assa.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1pp on lined North West Territories letterhead, watermarked “Old Hampden;” and an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes a short letter to his wife, Marion. He writes that "Mr. Meredith arrive last night and leaves this afternoon. We had a hot dinner yesterday and more hot weather in the House is promised. Mr. Meredith came up to the House with me but seems to have gone again. He promised to go with me to Government House to call on the Governor."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1901, May 17 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, Assa.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 2pp on lined North West Territories letterhead, watermarked “Old Hampden;” and an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes a letter to his wife, Marion. He writes that "the Stock Association Bill was in Committee today and most of the clauses were passed." He, then, expresses his anger over the way Bruce has acted. Patrick states that Bruce "had agreed to come when sent for and I think Cash must have tampered with him." He mentions the amount of water that remains and his surprise that it hasn't went down quicker. He, then, states that he is "trying to listen to Rosenwall's proposal to amend the Exemption Ordinance and write at the same time."

He states that he has "sent copies of [his] Marriage Amending Bill to several parties at Devil's Lake and Yorkton and copies of the Stock Association Ordinance to several parties." He then advises his wife that she "had better send a messenger for Bruce in case of the kind you mention."

He ends his letter stating that he "can not consent to satisfy [Marion's] curiosity relative to my moustache at present. When you arrive you will see for yourself."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1901, May 22 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina (N.W.T.)

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, Assa.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1pp lined North West Territories letterhead, watermarked “Old Hampden;” and an envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife, Marion, that he will start for Calgary in the morning. He mentions the hot weather and hopes that Yorkton has got a few of the rain showers that Regina has had and then talks of the lakes filling up and the grass growing.

He writes that he sees that "F.P. has an editorial on [his] Marriage Bill which will be in Committee today."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1902, Apr 16 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. Marion G. Patrick, Yorkton, Assa.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1pp on lined North West Territories letterhead, and envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife, Marion, that he had "a very effective speech" yesterday "on the amendment to the motion to go into supply." Bennett also made an effective speech. However, Patrick writes that "the result in the House of course was not effective whatever effect it may have in this country." He tells his wife that "the Standard publishes my Autonomy Speech in full this session, also I believe the Caribou."

Patrick finishes his letter "wondering how things are in Yorkton." He writes that "papa will soon be back."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1902, Mar 22 – Letter to Marion

Place: Winnipeg

From: Alf [T.A. Patrick]

To: Mrs. Marion G. Patrick, Yorkton, Assa.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1pp typewritten letter on Hotel Leland, Winnipeg letterhead. Envelope is printed with “Hotel Leland, Winnipeg, proprietor W.D. Douglas.” Address is typed.

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife, Marion, that he has been busy "loafing" around Winnipeg since his arrival there. He mentions that he had lunch with Sanford Evans, editor of the Telegram, who had wrote "one of the articles on Territorial Autonomy in the last number of the Canadian Magazine." He states that he had to refuse to say anything for publication but that the discussion resulted in Evans agreeing to send a Telegram correspondent to Regina to write up the debates.

Patrick states that "the Nord-Westen (German) is a convert to my views and kindly consented to give reports of my work at Regina at full length without asking anything for doing it. This is unusual in a German newspaper." He then reports that he attended a the Winnipeg medical society "to hear and see a lecture on Neilsen's stomach and liver."

Patrick also had diner with H. A. Robson, late deputy attorney general of the North West Territories, and they chatted about Regina and the North West Government, which Robson thought "worthy of condemnation." Patrick reports that Robson assured him "that the opinions expressed to the Devils Lake school district in respect of the assessment of Doukhobortsi were wrong and that the opinion I expressed to them was right."

He finish his letter stating, "I expect a fighting session and will probably have given and received hard blows before I see you again."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1903, Aug 21 – Letter to Marion

Place: Pembroke, Ont[ario]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Marion [G. Patrick]

Details: 3pp on lined Copeland House, Pembroke Ont. letterhead

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife while in Ontario. He tells his wife that he arrived in Pembroke and drove to Rankin on the hunt for old Mr. Gulke. Patrick had his "mind made up to offer him $1000.00" but he learned "that Dan Hoffmann of Ebenezer had offered him one hundred dollars, and it was not long until" they "closed a deal for $200.00 for the half section."

Patrick further writes that in buying the land, he "was in doubt as to the liability of the late son's estate to the company which sold him and Galling and Martin Kielow the threshing outfit." He tells his wife that she would remember "Mrs. Kielow's telling [her] that they (Kielows) only finished paying this year." Patrick states, "in any case there is a big thing in it even if I make nothing out of the deceased son's quarter section. I do not know whether the other two daughters are entitled to share in their dead brother's estate and believe they are not." He continues, "the interesting position that I know I have made on the deal something between $1000.00 and $2500.00 bu am not certain how much."

He informs his wife that he will reach Toronto and Hamilton by the next night and states that he is "doing so well that [he] shall push inquiries into the 800 acre estate at Hamilton before returning even if it takes two or three days."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

Results 601 to 700 of 88125