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Bruce Peel Special Collections Hudson's Bay Company Item
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Correspondence, 17 June 1871

Correspondence from Donald A. Smith at Hudson's Bay House, London, [England] to Henry Connolly at Rigolet, Labrador Coast. Also included is a handwritten transcript and a brief description of significant people and places mentioned in the letter.

The letter asks the recipient to allow the passage of [Mr. McArthur], who has recently retired, through Labrador.

The descriptive document provides some biographical information about Donald Smith and Henry Connolly as well as some information about Fort Rigolette [sic].

Correspondence with envelope, 27 September 1871

Correspondence from W. J. Christie at Lower Fort Garry to J. S. Helmcken at Victoria, [Vancouver Island?] Also included is a small, blue envelope marked with Helmcken's name and location.

The sender informs the recipient that he and other Hudson's Bay officers in London, [England] would like to formally express respect and esteem to Donald A. Smith and asks if the recipient will join them in doing so.

York Fort America anno, 1715

A double-sided, printed card stamped with publisher information for Jackdaw No. C5 The Fur Trade and a note that the card was printed in Canada.

On one side, the card outlines the value of various trading goods. Goods include toiletries, clothing, animal skins, tools and implements, and household goods, such as thread. On the reverse side, the card details the value of goods traded at York Fort, including a breakdown of the goods and their quantities, between 8 September 1714 and 1 August 1715. The goods listed are animals skins. The items are tallied and noted that they are to be "packed up to be sent home and valued into beaver."

Hiring contract, 18[00]

An unused Hudson's Bay Company hiring contract. The contract has blank spaces to capture the incumbant's name, job title, duties, and wage, as well as blank spaces for the date and the signature of a witness.

Hiring contract, 27 July 1812

An engagement contract for John Nouray, which renews his previous contract with "the Governor and the Company of Adventurers of England, Trading into Hudson's Bay" (the Hudson's Bay Company). The contract binds Nouray to the Company for three years of service.

Proclamation, 15 July 1817

A call for obedience and restitution from agents of the North West Company at the forks of the Red River in light of recent land disputes with the Hudson's Bay Company. The Earl of Selkirk, acting under the charter of the Hudson's Bay Company, is positioned as the principal proprietor and land owner of the region in question.

The proclamation is signed by James Bird, governor N.D. [Northern Department?], and [Governor] Miles MacDonell of Assiniboia and addressed to Simon McGillivray per De Rocheblave.

Report, 27 September 1822

Report of furs seized from Registi La Rinti by John Clarke, chief trader of the Hudson's Bay Company. La Rinti was caught trading furs on Hudson's Bay Company territory at the lower Red River without a license, 27 September 1822.

Correspondence, 21 April 1823

Personal correspondence from David MacBeath in Edinburgh, [Scotland] to MacBeath's brother-in-law, John Robison, in London, [England].

David MacBeath discusses family affairs, including his marriage to John Robison's sister, Emelia Robison, his financial situation, and MacBeath's interest in a position with the Hudson's Bay Company.

Correspondence, 15 December 1827

Correspondence from D. McKenzie (likely Donald McKenzie) at Red River to [Governor] Chief Factors and Chief Traders of the Northern Department. The letter describes a scarcity of goods, the failure of crops, the concerns of settlement inhabitants, abundant bison, and the distribution of pemmican.

Correspondence, 10 December 1828

A handwritten copy of a letter sent by Chief Trader Francis Heron at Brandon House to Chief Factors and Chief Traders of the Northern Department.

The letter describes trade relations with Americans and the sender's difficulties re-establishing trade with Indigenous peoples after a prairie fire drove them away. The "Stone Indians" [Nakhóta?] and Cree [Nēhiyaw] are the two groups named in relation to trade in Canada. A conflict between the Americans and the Pawnee is also described.

Correspondence, 10 July 1831

Correspondence from Robert Harding at Churchill to Alexander Christie at York Factory.

The letter describes fur shipments and the movement of other goods, and hunting at Churchill, including instructions given to Indigenous hunters working for the Hudson's Bay Company about which animals may be hunted. The two groups named are Chepoweyans [sic] [Denesuliné] and Cree [Nēhiyaw].

Correspondence, 6 August 1831

Correspondence from Andrew Wilson at "Split Lake" to Alexander Christie at York Factory.

Wilson confirms receipt of documents carried to him by Indigenous couriers, receipt of twine, the failure of the fishery, and distribution of goods to Indigenous people. The letter also describes the Indigenous people of the Split Lake region's suffering and starvation that came as a result of an animal shortage and instructions from the Hudson's Bay Company to not hunt beaver.

Correspondence, 29 August 1831

Correspondence from Donald Ross at Norway House to Alexander Christie at York Factory.

The letter confirms receipt of cargo delivered by John Ballandine, the Oxford House guide, and explains the status of Norway House's pemmican.

Joseph Touron's report, 28 September 1831

A handwritten copy of a report that describes the experiences of Joseph Touron. Also included is a document that provides historical background information.

The report describes the actions of and names of Hudson's Bay Company traders who abandoned the Company to trade with the Americans. A man named Berger is singled out as the man responsible for persuading a group of traders, including Peigan [Piikáni] hunters and James Bird, to desert the Hudson's Bay Company. Touron describes receiving threats from the deserters when he refuses to join them, and Touron states that he formed connections with Blood [Kainai] people when the Peigan [Piikáni] hunters could not be persuaded to return to trade with the Hudson's Bay Company.

Report, 28 November 1831

A report from Fort Simpson to the Chief Factors and Chief Traders of the Hudson's Bay Company Northern Departments.

The report describes trade at Mackenzie River since the sender's last communication with the recipients. The report includes details about the movement of goods and the employment of Indigenous people.

Correspondence, 20 May 1833

Correspondence from William Mackintosh at Fort Dunvegan to Chief Factor John Charles at Fort Chipiwean [sic].

The letter describes the arrival of men and children, the status of grain seeds, a need for new canoes, an account of skins at Fort Dunvegan, and transactions with other Hudson's Bay Company posts, including Fort Vermilion, New Caledonia, and Slave Lake. The letter also describes conflicts between trappers and "Beaver Indians" [Dane-zaa], and the hiring of Iroquois [Haudenosaunee] people. Slave (Slavey) labour is mentioned in passing.

Standing rules and regulations

A print report outlining the Hudson's Bay Company's rules and regulations pertaining to tariffs and inventory prices.

The document outlines distinct rules for tariffs and prices as they relate to specific goods and the activities of "Commissioned Gentlemen," "Clerks and Servants," "Freemen," and "Half-breed and Iroquois Trappers" [Métis and Haudenosaunee trappers]. The cost of moving private orders between Hudson's Bay Company posts is also described.

Report, 1835

Print report outlining the Hudson's Bay Company's rules and regulations pertaining to wages.

The report includes rules and regulations pertaining to freight costs and wages, including those for wage according to position held and region occupied, accepting gratuity, and transferring money. Some consequences for failing to follow these prescribed rules are also included.

Regulations for promoting moral and religious improvement

A print report outlining the Hudson's Bay Company's rules and regulations pertaining to the "religious improvement" of servants and "effectual civilization" of Company employees' families and Indigenous peoples associated with the Company. Portions of other reports are also included.

The report outlines conduct and moralizing activities prescribed to servants, women, children, and Indigenous people in general. It is suggested that all groups listed attend religious services, that wives and children speak the language of their husband or father, that women and children should occupy their time with activities that promote "virtuous habits," and that fathers should spend part of their leisure time educating their children.

The portions of other reports included in this document prescribe rules and regulation related to Indigenous hunting and trapping, providing for wives and children, tariffs, wages, trade, inventories and property, and payment to and treatment of Indigenous people, including a statement calling for gradual decreases in liquor sales to Indigenous peoples. Partial rules and regulations aimed at preserving beaver populations are also included.

Total returns Saskatchewan District outfit, 1836

Report on the total returns of the Saskatchewan District outfit in the year 1836. The small transcribed excerpt lists a few furs included in the list.

The report lists quantities of furs, leather products, clothing, and food products produced by the district that were brought to Norway House. The report also includes items brought from New Caledonia and Cumberland. The letter is signed "E. E." at York Factory.

Correspondence, 14 September 1839

Private correspondence from Andrew Linklater at Nelson River to Thomas Spence at York Factory.

Linklater sends his well-wishes and shares details about his circumstances.

Correspondence, 15 February 1831

Correspondence from Robert Harding at Churchill to Alexander Christie at York Factory.

Robert Harding notes that he and those in his company have been stuck in Churchill due to bad weather and an injury suffered by a man in his company. He also tells the recipient that he has sent half-dried meat by dogsled to York Factory.

Correspondence, 14 May 1831

Correspondence from Donald McIntosh at Fort William to George Simpson, governor in chief of Rupert's Land, at Red River.

The letter confirms that the order sent by Chief Factor McTavish has been received at Fort William and "agreeable to instructions are now sent on" to Norway House and York Factory.

Correspondence, 19 June 1831

Correspondence from Donald Ross at Norway House to Alexander Christie at York Factory.

The letter confirms receipt of cargo. Ross notes that the Indigenous people who brought the cargo to York Factory were sent back with no cargo to return. A person by the name of [W.] Cameron is noted to be waiting for the Saskatchewan and Swan River Brigades.

Correspondence, 26 June 1831

Correspondence from Donald Ross at Norway House to Alexander Christie at York Factory.

The letter informs Christie that he can expect to receive business documents sent by Ross via canoe. The letter also describes exchanges of provisions between Hudson's Bay Company posts, goods distribute to various brigades, and Ross's need for a carpenter. A man named [W.] Cameron is also mentioned.

Correspondence, 26 March 1846

Correspondence from James Hargrave at Norway House to William Mactavish at York Factory.

The letter addresses the harvesting of timber and the fishery at York Factory, goods scarcities, and a note from C. F. [Chief Factor] [Alexander] Christie requesting gunpowder to be sent to Red River.

Correspondence, 14 December 1846

Correspondence from James Harrold at Fishing Lakes [near Fort Qu'Appelle?] to William McTavish [sic] at York Factory.

The letter describes a trip planned to York Factory, ice fishing, weather, and a message from "Mr. Hargrave" about fishing, which may refer to James Hargrave. The letter also includes a brief inventory of fish caught on open water.

List of Indians hunters who has gone off and died from this place since [outfit] 1845

A handwritten report detailing Indigenous families associated with Oxford House and Indigenous people associated with Oxford House who have died or moved.

The report names Indigenous hunters who have died or moved away from Oxford House. It also includes the names of male hunters along with their relationship to other hunters and a numerical account of their wives, sons, daughters, and "[separate] followers." The report is signed by L. [a] Robertson of Oxford House.

Correspondence, 2 June 1851

Copy of correspondence from George Simpson at Moose Factory to Donald Ross at Norway House.

The letter describes an incident at the district of [Kinogoumiss], which may refer to the area near Kenogamisis Lake in Ontario. The incident involved an alleged attack on Postmaster Donald Grant, who was in charge of the Flying Post. The letter states that it is not possible to bring the accused Indigenous man to trial due to a lack of evidence and other complications, so on Simpson's order, the accused attacker is to be moved to a post on the Northwest Pacific Coast so that he cannot return home. Simpson states that he cannot issue official instructions and asks for private letters to be sent to possible recipients of the accused. Since Simpson is not sure who will receive the man, letters are to be sent to "Mr. Douglas," "Mr. Work", and "Mr. Ballenderi."

Correspondence, 23 March 18[52]

Private correspondence from an unknown sender to an unknown recipient at Fort Garry.

The letter describes exchanges of goods and letters with other Hudson's Bay Company posts. It also notes the movement of livestock to Red River, news about women named Mrs MacChristie and Mrs Campbell, the storage of a Catholic Bishop's piano, and medical needs. A man named Mr Lockhart is also mentioned.

Fur store report, 1864

A report detailing the quantity and condition of furs received at York Factory during the summer of 1864 from various districts of the Northern Department. The letter is signed "MKR."

Districts included in the report are the following: Athabasca District, English River, Saskatchewan District, Cumberland District, Swan River District, Lower Red River District, [Lac] la Pluie District, Norway House District, [Island] Lake Post, Severn Post, Trout Lake Post, and Churchill Post.

1818 Pierre Pambrun Indictment, Pemmican War

Indictment for Robbery, signed in Montreal, 1818.

Docket reads: "No. 19. King's Bench, Montreal. March Term, 1818. Dominus Rex vs. Pierre C. Pambrun, Jean Bte. Girard, Antoine Robillard, Jean Bte. Lagarde, Frans. Boucher & Benonie Marie. Indictment for Robbery. A True Bill. [signed] Fs. Rolland, foreman. Witnesses: Jean Gab. Lalonde, dt. La Prielle, Jean Bte. Chauvin. Process. fyled 5 March. [signed] N.F. Uniacke, Atty Genl."

From notes provided by the donor: "This original document outlines the charge of robbery against Pierre Chrysologue Pambrun (1792-1841) and his associates (all employees of the Hudson's Bay Company), which took place on the 10th of November 1816. The indictment was officially filed with the Court of King's Bench in Montreal on 2nd of March 1818.

The charge is stated (in essence) as:

'With force and arms at a place called 'Lapuise' the accused men (employees of the HBC) assaulted and endangered the life of Joseph Belcour (trader with the NWC [North West Company]) on the 'highway' aforesaid (Lac des Cedres Rouges), and stole 9 beaver skins, 25 musk rat skins, 2 otter skins, 1 bear skin, 1 keg of gun powder, one sack of lead balls (28 pounds weight), 1 roll of tobacco (65 pounds weight), 9 pairs of woollen blankets, 3.5 yards of scarlet cloth, 14 yards of blue cloth, 21 yards of blue cloth, 6 frocks (commonly called capots made of woollen cloth or molton), 3 figured flannel robes, 1 pound and ten ounces weight of beads, 200 gun flints, 1 piece and one-half piece of broad tape, 1 Indian knife, 3 clasp knives, three-quarters of a pound of vermilion, 1 gimblet, 23 shoemaker's awls, 12 gun worms, and 4 dozen metal rings powder (each listed with values), the goods and chattel of 'certain persons' (i.e., Joseph Belcour, on behalf of the NWC).'

Pierre Pambrun was a long-time employee and servant of the HBC, and was intimately involved in the 'Pemmican War' disputes between the HBC and the North West Company, primarily during the years 1814 to 1816. Pambrun, as witness, provided the courts with his observations and experiences of various skirmishes between the two companies. His evidence was included in published accounts of the trials.

Not much is known about Joseph Belcour, aside from the fact that we know that he was employed by the NWC in 1811 at Athabasca River. Although not stated on the document, we can safely conclude that he was still associated with the NWC during the time of this incident, as the document is written in the style and format of similar indictments brought against the HBC by the NWC. We can also safely concluded that this legal action taken was paid for by the NWC coalition, as part of a larger retaliatory action against the HBC, in the fight for unrestricted access to furs and supplies (i.e., pemmican) in western Canada.

Norman Fitzgerald Uniacke, son of Nova Scotia's Attorney General Richard John Uniacke, was Attorney General of Lower Canada at the time of the 'Pemmican War' hearings. He was a controversial figure, and was criticised for his very superficial acquaintance with criminal law and inadequate knowledge of civil law.

This official document was brought before the courts in Montreal, but did not proceed to completion owing to the fact that the 'Jurisdiction Act' of 1803 did not clearly state the jurisdiction of the courts of Lower Canada. Thus, the 'Indian Countries' fell outside of their area of responsibility. In addition, it was argued that the trials would not escape sympathetic influence of Montreal residents (including lawyers) connected in some way to the NWC. Thus, the trials were moved to York (Toronto), and the legal actions continued in the fall of 1818."

1821 Act for regulating the Fur Trade

Titled: "An Act for regulating the Fur Trade, and establishing a Criminal and Civil Jurisdiction within certain Parts of North America. (2d July 1821.)" Removed from a bound volume printed in London, Great Britain by Eyre and Strahan in 1821. Pages are numbered 569-575.

From notes provided by the donor: "This act, released shortly after the amalgamation of the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company, granted exclusive trading rights to the 'new' H.B.C. for a period of 21 years. The act also extended the legality of the 'Jurisdiction Act of 1803' to include all territory specified by the H.B.C.'s lease."

1830 Assignment of stock, McGillivray to Ellice

This is Edward Ellice's copy of an indenture between John Richardson, George Gregory and Samuel Gerrard of the First Part, Simon McGillivray of the Second Part, and Edward Ellice of the Third Part.

Docket reads: "Dated 29 Sept 1830, The trustees of Simon McGillivray Esq & the said Simon McGillivray to Edwd Ellice Esq, Copy Assignment of Hudsons Bay Stock and other Trust Effects in consideration of £110,000 [line] 1700. Norman Bethune Tutor Pltf vs. The Right Honourable Edward Ellice Defdt., Defendants Exhibit No.4 Filed Feb. 20th 1839 [signature illegible]."

From notes provided by the donor: "This indenture between John Richardson and George Gregory (formerly of the XY Company and North West Company), Simon McGillivray (formerly of the North West Company), and Edward Ellice (formerly of Phyn, Ellices and Inglis of Schenectady and the North West Company, and later of the Hudson's Bay Company) details the arrangements made regarding the financial interests of those holding title in the consolidated fur trade concern (formerly that of the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company).

Throughout the document, many details are given with respect to share and stock allocations to individual traders and trading groups. The docket states that this document was used as "Defendant's Exhibit No. 4" in a litigation filed 20 Feb. 1839, naming Norman Bethune as plaintiff and Edward Ellice as defendant. Edward Ellice stands out as one of the main players in bringing about the union between the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company. Upon the failure of McTavish, McGillivrays and Company in 1825, he became the only one who stood between the Hudson's Bay Company and the claims of discontented members of the North West Company. As a result, Ellice became involved in the series of litigations which lasted for 25 years. Norman Bethune was among the many people seeking financial compensation through Ellice."

1846 Article regarding the HBC Charter

Titled: "A Few Words on the Hudson's Bay Company." Written by Alexander Kennedy Isbister, and published by C. Gilpin in London, likely in 1846. This copy has been removed from a bound volume. It is a review of the status of the H.B.C. with petitions for redress of grievances.

Isbister, Alexander Kennedy

1850 Rights and Powers of HBC

Docket reads: "Papers relating to the Legality of the Powers in respect to Territory, Trade, Taxation and Government claimed or exercised by the Hudson's Bay Company, on the Continent of North America, under the Charter of Charles the Second, or in Virtue of any other Right or Title. Ordered by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 12 July 1850."

A look at the rights claimed by the Hudson's Bay Company, including copies of correspondence, replies, opinions, and a map.

1853-55 Fort Simpson Journal

From the first report provided by the donor (see notes on accompanying materials below): "The Fort Simpson Journal contains the expected daily and routine entries on weather conditions, entertaining descriptions of the laborers and their occupations, and general comments on trading activities. The journal also contains a plethora of lengthy and intensely interesting entries describing specific activities and events hitherto unknown and unrecorded elsewhere."

The author of the Fort Simpson journal is William Henry McNeill (1801-1875). He does not name himself in the journal itself, but the donor has provided research identifying him through HBC Archives documents. McNeill took charge of Fort Simpson in 1851, was appointed Chief Factor in 1856, left from 1859-1861, before finally departing the fort in 1863. The town of Port McNeill on Vancouver Island is named for him.

The Hudson's Bay Company founded Fort Simpson, which eventually developed into Port Simpson and later Lax Kw'alaams. It is located on the coast of British Columbia.

McNeill, William Henry

Resolution challenging HBC rights

A document titled: "Resolutions to be moved by Mr. Dawson for An Address to Her Majesty, on the subject of the North Western parts of this Province, the Indian Territories and the Hudson's Bay Company." From the first (1st) session of the sixth (6th) Parliament. Printed by order of the Legislative Assembly by the printer John Lovell in Toronto.

This document has eighteen (18) resolutions outlining the history of the Hudson's Bay Company, challenging the validity of HBC's trading rights, and proposing that their lease to trade within the so-called "Indian Territories" not be renewed.

1858 Resolution: renewal of HBC rights

A document titled: "Resolutions to be proposed by the Hon. Mr. Loranger, in reference to Rupert's land, the Indian Territory and the affairs of the Hudson Bay Company." Printed by the Queen's Printer, S. Derbishire & G. Desbarats.

The six (6) resolutions propose a limited renewal of the Hudson's Bay Company's trading rights. The proposal is for the Canadian government to assume all territory the HBC claimed, allowing the company to retain only those lands on which it had built or otherwise improved. The HBC would not be eligible for compensation from lands lost.

1871 HBC deed poll

A document titled: "Deed Poll by the Governor and Company of Hudson's Bay, for conducting their trade in North America, and for defining the rights and prescribing the duties of their officers." Printed by Sir Joseph Causton & Sons, London, United Kingdom.

From notes provided by the donor: "An internal document outlining the rights and duties of H.B.C. officers, outlines the number of Chief Factors, Factors, Chief Traders and Junior Chief Traders, the distribution of shares, and many other details."

1887 HBC deed poll

A document titled: "Deed Poll by the Governor and Company of Hudson's Bay, for conducting their trade in North America, and for defining the rights and prescribing the duties of their officers, 1871. Amended by Shareholders, June 27th, 1876; June 24th, 1879." Printed by Sir Joseph Causton & Sons in London, United Kingdom.

From notes provided by the donor: "An updated version of the Deed Poll issued in 1871, outlining the rights and duties of H.B.C. officers, outlines the number of Chief Factors, Factors, Chief Traders and Junior Chief Traders, the distribution of shares, and many other details.

1933 HBC Fur Trade Post Manual

On the cover: "Hudson's Bay Company incorporated 2nd May 1670, Post Manual, Fur Trade Department."
Inside the front cover, someone has written "No. 18" in ink, and someone has penciled in "ca. 1933."

This document is a compilation of regulations for the Fur Trade Department, with room at the end for postmanagers to insert additional memoranda. All pages are typewritten. This particular copy is in such fine condition as to suggest it was never used.

1845 Letter from James Douglas

A hand-written letter written by James Douglas to James M. Yale, Hudson’s Bay Company Chief Trader at Fort Langley, British Columbia. This letter was sent from Fort Victoria. Douglas writes about recent events and expresses some opinions about many of the issues facing the Pacific Northwest operations of the HBC.
From notes provided by the donor: “Douglas sheds light on the following issues of the time:
a) H.B.C. servants and their suitability for advancement
b) Furs and fur returns
c) Agricultural crops and the weather affecting yield in the region
d) The visit by Chief Factor Peter Skene Ogden, having travelled overland from Red River and into the Columbia River through the Coutonais (Kootenay) Portage, in the company of British Officers Henry J. Warre and Mervin Vavasour (on their ‘secret’ military reconnaissance of the Oregon Territory)
e) The arrival and operations of H.M.S. America, under the charge of Captain John Gordon (the brother of Lord Aberdeen, Foreign Secretary at the time, and later Prime Minister)
f) Activity of H.B.C. traders: Chief Factor Lewis (sic), Chief Trader John Work, and Donald Mason
g) Returns of the most recent Outfit (the yearly trade cycle of the fur trade)
h) The wretched state of John Clarke (a long-time H.B.C. employee, who has fallen on hard times)
i) The potential for salt to be gathered from salt marshes on Cowegen (Cowichan) lands, without attracting the attention of the Americans, who would undoubtedly try to capitalize on the resource
j) A visit from American whaling ship captains, whose ships are lying at anchor in Neah Bay.”

Douglas, James, Sir

1850 Letter from Donald Ross to James Keith

Handwritten letter from Donald Ross, Chief Factor of Norway House, to his friend James Keith in Aberdeen [Scotland]. James Keith was formerly the Chief Factor at Fort Chipewyan. In this letter, Ross writes about the poor mood he's suffered over the past year, laments the scarcity of furred animals, and predicts that gold will be the basis for the Hudson's Bay Company profits in the future. He expresses doubt that profits from coal will ever amount to much.

Ross, Donald

1857 Copy of a Letter & Memo from Chief Justice Draper

From the docket: “Hudson’s Bay Company. Copy of the Letter addressed by Mr. Chief Justice Draper to Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for the Colonies, bearing date the 6th day of May 1857, together with a Copy of the Memorandum therein referred to, relative to the Hudson’s Bay Company. (Mr. Labouchere.) Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 16 June 1857.”

This letter and enclosure request that British Parliament settle the question of the exact boundaries between the Hudson's Bay Company and the Province of Canada. From page 5: "The rights of the Hudson’s Bay Company, whatever they may be, are derived from the Crown; the Province of Canada has its boundaries assigned by the same authority; and now that it appears to be indispensable that those boundaries should be settled, and the true limits of Canada ascertained, it is to Her Majesty’s Government that the Province appeals to take such steps as in its wisdom are deemed fitting or necessary to have this important question set at rest.”

1858 Correspondence Relating to The Hudson's Bay Company

On the cover: Hudson's Bay Company-Return to an Address of the Honourable The House of Commons, dated 16 February 1858;-for, "Copies or Extracts of any Correspondence that has taken place between the Colonial Office and the Hudson's Bay Company, or the Government of Canada, in consequence of the Report of the Select Committee on the Affairs of the Company which sat in the last Session of Parliament."

Treaty Between Her Majesty and the USA Regarding the Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound Agricultural Companies

Title: Treaty Between Her Majesty and The United States of America, for The Settlement of the Claims of the Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound Agricultural Companies Signed at Washington, July 1, 1863. Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of Her Majesty. 1864

Details the various articles surrounding the settlement of the claims between The Hudson's Bay Company and Puget Sound, WA, USA.

Papers Relating to Rupert's Land

Title: Canada (Rupert's Land). Copy or Extracts of Correspondence between the Colonial Office, the Government of the Canadian Dominion, and the Hudson's Bay Company, relating to the Surrender of Rupert's Land by the Hudson's Bay Company, and for the Admission thereof into the Dominion of Canada. Ordered by The House of Commons.

Contains multiple letters to and from various parties, including: Despatches [sic] from the Governor, Despatches from the Secretary of State, Correspondence Between the Colonial Office and the Hudson's Bay Company, Correspondence Between the Colonial Office and Sir G. Cartier and Mr. McDougall (Delegates).

1839 (May) from John Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudsons Bay House, London [England]

From: John Smith

To: The Revd John Smithurst, Church Missionary House, Salisbury Square [London, England]

Details: 1pp

Notes: This letter confirms a previous conversation between John Smith of Hudson's Bay House in London and Reverend John Smithurst. Rev. Smithurst is awarded the position of chaplain to the Hudson's Bay Company at Red River in Rupert's Land. He is granted passage from London to Fort Garry [modern-day Winnipeg].

1841 (Sept) from Ina Cowie to Smithurst

Place: York Factory

From: Ina Cowie

To: Revd John Smithurst, Red River

Details: 2pp with integral address

Notes: A letter of effusive thanks for Rev. Smithurst’s kindness in recommending Ina Cowie to the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) for employment. It seems Rev. Smithurst spoke with his friend Captain Herd on Cowie’s behalf. Cowie also mentions that he wishes to write to the Church Missionary Society to let them know of Rev. Smithurst’s thoughtfulness.

1842 (Mar) from William Cockran to Smithurst

Place: [Grand Rapids?]

From: Wm Cockran

To: Rev. J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Details: 3pp with integral address

Notes: Reverend William Cockran writes to Rev. Smithurst regarding Rev. Cowley and his wife Mrs. Cowley, who have lodged with Rev. Cockran since they arrived in Rupert’s Land the previous autumn. Rev. Cockran describes the Cowleys as being ungracious guests who do not understand the expense of living in the Red River Settlement. Rev. Cockran also writes that he has severed ties to the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Church Missionary Society but will continue as if he will “continue here for life.” He finishes the letter by discussing the flour he is sending to Henry Budd at the Cumberland House Mission. He mentions that James Sandison and Henry Bird are assisting him.

Cockran, William

1843 (Mar) from James Keith to Smithurst

Place: Lachine near Montreal

From: James Keith

To: Reverend Smithurst, Red River Settlement

Details: 1pp and integral address

Notes: Discusses Rev. Smithurst's subscription to Church Weekly Paper, and his cancelled subscription to the Montreal Herald.

Keith, James

1844 (May) from Daniel Aillud to Smithurst

Place: St. Paul's Cray Kent

From: Daniel Aillud

To: The Revd John Smithurst, Indian Settlement, Red River, Hudsons Bay, Nth America

Details: 2pp

Notes: Daniel Aillud writes to Rev. Smithurst requesting a character reference so that he can leave his work as a sailor on the “Prince Rupert” for the Hudson’s Bay Company. He also discusses the death of his father, who died while he was at sea.

1844 (Sept) from James Hargrave to Smithurst

Place: York Factory

From: James Hargrave

To: Revd John Smithurst, &c. &c. &c., Red River Settlement

Details: 1pp and integral address face

Notes: James Hargrave, an HBC employee, responds to a letter from Rev. Smithurst delivered by Mr. Morvat. The letter dealt with receiving and sending articles by the ship “Prince Rupert.” Hargrave goes on to say that Rev. Hunter and his wife arrived from London, and have continued on to the Saskatchewan District [Cumberland - Devon mission] in a boat along with part of their baggage. The rest of their baggage will be sent to them in the Spring.

1845 (Oct) from Nicol Finlayson to Smithurst

Place: Fort Frances

From: Nicol Finlayson

To: Revd Mr John Smithurst, Missy Ch. M. Society, Red River Settlement

Details: 1pp with integral address face

Notes: Nicol Finlayson writes to Rev. Smithurst that he sent along the requested maps, and he sends his best wishes to Mr. and Mrs. Cockran.

Finlayson, Nicol

1846 Cumberland Mission accounts

Place: Cumberland Mission

Details: 2pp

Notes: Cumberland Mission list showing the accounts for making and packing bags and pemmican for Rev. Smithurst. Named individuals are: John Vincents, Thomas Logan, James Inkster, James MonKinun, William Bird, William Rob Smith, and Thomas Thomas.

1848 (Apr) from John Black to Smithurst

Place: Lower Fort Garry

From: John Black

To: Revd John Smithurst

Details: 2pp and integral address face.

Notes: John Black writes to Rev. Smithurst that he is sending along the requested nails by the bearer of this letter. Also, the flooding experienced the previous week resulted in 4 feet of water in the office, and significant ice damage to the distillery.

Black, John

1848 (May) from Duncan Finlayson to Smithurst

Place: Lachine

From: Dun: Finlayson

To: The Revd Jn Smithurst, Red River Settlement

Details: 2pp and integral address face

Notes: Duncan Finlayson writes to Rev. Smithurst. Sir George Simpson is travelling by steam to Sault de St. Marie soon. He answers questions about subscriptions to the New York Albion and the Church. Finlayson is startled by the new republics in France and Prussia, and the fear in Russia, Austria, and the Italian states. He also mentions that Ireland is in "a very disturbed State."

Finlayson, Duncan

1850 (Aug) from Donald Ross to Smithurst

Place: Norway House

From: Don Ross

To: Reverend J Smithurst, Indian Settlement, Red River

Details: 2pp and an envelope

Notes: A private letter written quickly by Donald Ross to Rev. John Smithurst. He vaguely refers to trouble involving Mr. Hunter, and also refuses to comment on an unidentified situation.

Ross, Donald

1850 (Nov) from W. G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson's Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Revd John Smithurst, Red River Settlement

Details: 3pp and integral address face

Notes: Mr. Smith writes to Rev. Smithurst regarding financial matters. He comments that money is cheap due to the influx of gold from California.

Smith, William Gregory

1851 (May) from James Settee to Smithurst

Place: Lac La Ronge, C.M.L. Station

From: James Settee

To: The Reverend J. Smithurst,
Indian Settlement (crossed out),
Church Missionary House, Salisbury Square, London (crossed out),
Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire

Details: 3pp and integral address face

Notes: James Settee writes to Rev. Smithurst on a number of matters. He says that Thomas Cook brought Rev. Smithurst's last letter to him and told Settee that Rev. Smithurst was suffering badly from rheumatism. Settee says both he and his wife also suffer from rheumatism, which he blames on the cold climate. Settee is about to leave on a long journey to Norway House, and he mentions that the baptized Natives object to working on Sundays, but Settee feels that the portages would be impossible without the help of the Hudson's Bay Company boats and so they must work on the Sabbath to keep up. The mission at Lac La Ronge is doing well, and Settee hopes to writes to Rev. Smithurst again once he reaches Norway House.

While written in May, this letter has a cancellation for Sault Ste Marie, C.W. in September. The letter then made its way to Church Missionary House in London, England where it was then redirected to Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire.

Settee, James

1851 (Oct) from W. G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson's Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Revd John Smithurst, Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire [England]

Details: 2pp

Notes: In this letter, Mr. Smith writes to Rev. Smithurst to let him know that his packages have arrived in England and he will forward them by train.

Smith, William Gregory

1846 (Mar) from Alexander Christie Jr to Smithurst

Place: Lower Fort [Garry]

From: Alex[ander] Christie Jr.

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Carried by courier

Details: 2pp + integral address face

Notes: Christie discusses the shipment of goods that were deficient in the last shipment. He informs Smithurst that there is no flannel to be had, nor jackets of any description.

Christie, Alexander Jr

1847 (Jan & Apr) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d John Smithurst, R.R.S. [Red River Settlement]

Delivery: Forwarded to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and thence by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 1pp + integral address face

Notes: William Gregory Smith, a secretary at the Hudson’s Bay Company London office, acknowledges receipt of Smithurst’s letter dated August 4, 1846 containing two bills to be paid and credited to Mr. Cockran, also that six cases belonging to Mr. Cockran have arrived safely and “have not been lost sight of.”

An addition to the letter reads: “Your letter of the 17th Nov’r forwarded by Winter Packet has just come to hand. Sir George Simpson leaves tomorrow with the Express. I have therefore only time to say that every exertion shall be used to meet your wishes.”

Smith, William Gregory

1847 (May) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d John Smithurst, RRS [Red River Settlement]

Delivery: Forwarded to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 1 pp (letter) + 2 pp (invoice) + integral address face

Notes: Hudson’s Bay Company secretary W.G. Smith mentions having received Smithurst’s letter of November 17, 1846 on April 16, 1847 and having written a brief acknowledgement that was included with the Spring Express. Smith appends an invoice for goods ordered (tea, gun powder, sugar, mustard, salt petre, soda, starch, pork, soap, etc.) and says these were shipped to Smithurst on board the “Westminster” via York Factory and Red River Settlement.

Smith, William Gregory

1848 (Jan) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d John Smithurst, RRS [Red River Settlement]

Delivery: Forwarded to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 1 pp (letter) + 1 pp (invoice) + integral address face with hand postal marking

Notes: Hudson’s Bay Company secretary W.G. Smith offers his apologies to Rev. Smithurst. The vessel "Westminster" carrying Smithurst's ordered goods, arrived too late in the season to be unloaded before the Red River-bound boats were sent off. Consequently, very few of the privately ordered goods reached Red River before the Spring.

Smith acknowledges receiving Smithurst's letter of August 6, 1847 which was brought by the vessel "Prince Rupert" in October, 1847. He further apologizes because of an error in the charges for the last shipment. Adjustments have been made accordingly to Smithurst's balance, a copy of which is appended to the letter.

Smith, William Gregory

1848 (Apr) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, RRS [Red River Settlement]

Delivery: Forwarded to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 1 pp + integral address face with hand postal marking

Notes: Hudson’s Bay Company secretary W.G. Smith acknowledges Rev. Smithurst’s letter of November 23, 1847 which arrived by the Winter Packet. Smith apologizes and writes, “I regret to find that my worst fears, with regard to the loss and disappointment, likely to arise from the late arrival of the Westminster, have been fully realized.” Smith explains that, “[s]he had a most narrow escape and I believe that, had it not been for the 1st officer of the P[rince] Rupert, who was on board the Westminster when she was driven from her anchorage, both ship and cargo would have been lost.”

Smith goes on to say that Mr. Christie (at Red River) will refund Smithurst the overpayment made for the goods, caused by an accounting error.

Smith, William Gregory

[ca. 1847] from Alexander Christie Jr. to Smithurst

Place: [Lower Fort Garry]

From: Alex[ander] Christie Jr.

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Carried by courier

Details: 1 pp + integral address face

Notes: Christie thanks Smithurst for the gift of pigeons, and sends 495 lbs. of beef, crediting Smithurst’s account. While the note is undated, Christie was posted to Red River in 1847 and was transferred to Edmonton some time in 1848.

Christie, Alexander Jr

1849 (Sept) from William Douglas Lane to Smithurst

Place: Lower Fort Garry

From: W. Lane

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Local courier (probably Hudson’s Bay Company courier)

Details: 1pp + integral address face

Notes: A short letter by William Douglas Lane, Postmaster at Lower Fort Garry, noting that he is sending copies of Smithurst’s accounts. The reverse of the letter is covered with columns of numbers, lists, and calculations.

Lane, William Douglas

1850 (Jan & Apr) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, RRS [Red River Settlement]

Delivery: Forwarded to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 2pp + integral address face

Notes: Hudson’s Bay Company secretary William Gregory Smith discusses a request by Rev. Smithurst to submit money to the Hudson's Bay Company for interest. As mentioned to Smithurst by Sir George Simpson, the Company can do so only for money earned through the company. Smith did approach the Governor and Committee on Smithurst’s behalf, but they refused the request.

Also mentioned is business regarding a Mr. Henry Cook and the property of his deceased father. A postscript dated April 3, 1850, indicates Smith received additional papers from Rev. Smithurst regarding the late Joseph Cook, presumably Henry Cook's father, but he does not have time to process these before the Spring Packet leaves London.

An additional note scrawled in a different handwriting is written on the integral address face and mentions Cook and money.

Smith, William Gregory

1850 (Sept) from William Douglas Lane to Smithurst

Place: [Lower Fort Garry]

From: W[illiam Douglas] Lane

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Local courier (probably Hudson’s Bay Company courier)

Details: 2pp + integral address face

Notes: A short letter from William Douglas Lane, Postmaster at Lower Fort Garry, noting that the 10 lbs of nails that Rev. Smithurst requested are being sent, and fresh beef will be available shortly. Lane also thanks Smithurst for recovering some goods stolen [from Lower Fort Garry] by young Flett, while expressing his suspicion that William Tait put the boy up to it, but Lane intends to “do all in my power to get the young scamp punished.”

Lane, William Douglas

1851 (Jun) from William Douglas Lane to Smithurst

Place: Lower Fort Garry

From: W[illiam Douglas] Lane

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Local courier (probably Hudson’s Bay Company courier)

Details: 1pp + integral address face

Notes: A short letter by William Douglas Lane, Postmaster at Lower Fort Garry, discussing the payment of bills, refunding of money, and receipt of a flute.

Lane, William Douglas

1852 (Feb) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Wirksworth, Derbyshire (England)

Delivery: Great Britain mail

Details: 3pp + addressed envelope with postal marks (stamp removed)

Notes: Hudson’s Bay Company secretary W.G. Smith writes to say he is glad that Rev. Smithurst is enjoying himself upon his return to England, and discusses some outstanding balances due, including money from Henry Cook. He also mentions that he has a received large order from Rev. Cockran for blankets to be distributed to the Indians of his old mission.

Smith, William Gregory

1847 (Apr) from Duncan Finlayson to Smithurst

Place: Lachine

From: Dun: Finlayson

To: Revd Inv: Smithurst, Red River Settlement

Delivery: Carried by Hudson’s Bay Company canoe brigade to the Red River Settlement.

Details: 3pp + integral address.

Notes: A letter sent by Duncan Finlayson, Hudson’s Bay Company Director, to Reverend John Smithurst. The letter details issues related to supplies of wheat, and comments on the problems of receiving publications from England. Finlayson also mentions that Reverend William Cockran spent the winter in Toronto with his family. Rev. Cockran’s children had been ill and his son John died.

Finlayson, Duncan

PE001006 - Tour of Northern Hudson's Bay Company Posts

Unidentified photographer. Judging by the number of aerial photographs, those of bush planes, and the large number of Hudson’s Bay Company buildings and posts, this collection may document a tour of northern Hudson’s Bay Company posts in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario by someone linked with the HBC. Photographs of people usually show them holding fox furs. At least half of the photographs were taken during winter. Nearly all photographs are captioned on the back in pencil, and some are also numbered.
Places photographed include Fort McMurray (AB), Fort Chipewyan (AB), Embarras Portage (AB), Fort Vermilion (AB), Stony Rapids (SK), Moosonee (ON), Moose Factory (ON), Albany (ON), and Attawapiskat (ON).
A guide to the identified places is interleaved within the album.
In the group photograph, 42 adults stand on the steps of a building and smile for the camera. This photograph seems unrelated to the rest of the album.

PE000409 - McDermid Studios photographs of Edmonton

Two (2) B&W prints, both taken by McDermid Studio. First photograph is a street view in Edmonton, Alberta [Whyte Avenue?], and includes bull team with wagon; engine; automobile; and streetcar. Second photograph is of the Hudson's Bay Company fort, in Edmonton, Alberta. Descriptions and dates from the Glenbow Museum Photographic Archives.

McDermid Studios

PE004734 - Program for the annual HBC family picnic in Edmonton

Program for the annual Hudson’s Bay Company Edmonton employees’ family picnic dated July 8, 1931. Transportation of attendees to the picnic held at Alberta Beach was by train.  Attendees were expected to bring their own cutlery and cups.  Various races were scheduled, with candy prizes for children under nine (9).  After supper events included baseball, soft ball, and pitch and putt games.  President: Mr. A. F. Little, Judges: Mr. A. S. Ramsey, Mr. L. V. Trimble, and Mr. L. H. Thorlaksson, Announcer: Mr. Jack McKay, assisted by large Sports, Entertainment, Refreshment and Transportation committees.  Identified as Edmonton by pencilled notation on the cover.

PE001011 - Malcolm Tapp, Banff Springs Hotel Golf Pro Photo Album

Many of the photographs are staged Canadian Pacific publicity shots showing the handsome golf pro and the beautiful Banff Springs Hotel golf course. Tapp even appeared in a Hudson's Bay Company print advertisement. In this album, some photographs were taken by Nicholas Morant and a typewritten letter from him is included. Several photographs are of Malcolm Tapp posing with celebrity visitors to the resort, including singers Roy Rogers, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Bing Crosby, and Robert Goulet, as well as hockey legend Gordie Howe. There is a single print of Marilyn Monroe receiving a golf lesson from Tapp during her visit to Banff in 1953.

Of particular note:

  • 20.5 x 25.5 cm B&W photograph. A young Malcolm Tapp stands next to a man holding a clapboard. F510 / Cameraman Beesley / Scene No. A5. They are on the golf course and hold golf clubs. Camera on tripod is pointed by the cameraman at them.

  • Newspaper clipping: The Vancouver Sun: Sat., Mar. 21, 1964. Giant print ad for the Hudson’s Bay Company showing Malcolm Tapp posing on the golf course with various golf equipment and a young female model. “The Bay has the expert advice of professional Malcolm Tapp plus equipment for every golfer.”

  • 20 x 25.5 cm B&W original photograph used in the HBC advertisement.

  • 13 x 18 cm B&W photograph. [Taken in 1953 by John Vachon] – Marilyn Monroe smiling at the camera as Tapp gives her a golf lesson.

  • 16.5 x 21.5 cm B&W photograph. Shot inside the golf shop. An unknown man, Roy Rogers, and Malcolm Tapp (in a suit jacket and tie) stand together.

  • 16.5 x 21.5 cm B&W photograph. Four male golfers pose with golf clubs. Malcolm Tapp is leftmost. Singer Tennessee Ernie Ford is middle left in the white pants.

  • Four 16.5 x 21.5 cm B&W photographs of Bing Crosby and Malcolm Tapp.

  • 16.5 x 21.5 cm B&W photograph of Malcolm Tapp and a young Robert Goulet.

  • 16.5 x 21.5 cm B&W photograph of hockey legend Gordie Howe posing while talking with Malcolm Tapp in the golf shop. A smiling young boy looks directly into the camera.

Tapp, Malcolm

PE004717 - “Extract from Report on ‘The Hudson Bay Railway Belt and Hudson Bay,’ issued from the Natural Resources Intelligence Services, Department of the Interior, 1925.”

Typed document titled “Extract from Report on ‘The Hudson Bay Railway Belt and Hudson Bay,’ issued from the Natural Resources Intelligence Services, Department of the Interior, 1925.”  Pencilled at the top of the cover page is the name “D. W. McLachlan” who is author of the study.