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Cold Rooms

Two cold rooms one for storing volatile and unstable chemicals and the other is equipped as a laboratory.

Main Supply Room

Main supply room for the storage and retrieval of chemicals, glassware and other equipment needed for teaching and research. The supply room was located in the basement of the Physical Science Centre.

Chemical Analysis "Crew"

Chemical Analysis "Crew": R Kratochvil, J Plambeck, D Rabenstein, P Harris, L Ziola, B Burrows, G Horlick, G Johanson, WE Harris. Dated August 1973. Photograph taken outside of the Chemistry Building.

1859 (May) Letter from J. B. Robinson

Place: Toronto

From: J.B. Robinson

To: [Reverend C.E. Thomson]

Delivery: unknown

Details: 2pp

Notes: A short letter regarding the approaching Diocesan Synod and representatives from St. John’s Church in Elora.
Note on the back says “J.B. Robinson Esq. Read May 13/59.” While the recipient is not named, it is likely to be Reverend C. E. Thomson who led the Elora parish in 1859. J. B. Robinson is possibly Sir John Beverley Robinson, the noted lawyer and judge.

1873 (Jul) Letter to Bishop

Place: Elora

From: [Rev. C.E. Thomson]

To: Possibly addressed to Bishop of Toronto, Alexander Bethune

Delivery: unknown

Details: One sheet of paper, embossed.

Notes: A letter, marked "Copy," written July 23, 1873 in Elora. The recipient of the letter is likely the Bishop of Toronto, Alexander Neil Bethune. Although the signature is illegible, the probable author is Reverend C. E. Thomson. Various notes and numbers written on the back. Rev. Thomson writes that he would prefer Thorold, but will take Newmarket for the following Sunday. He also relates his opinion on the behaviour of Mr. Butler, who "has forgotten himself since he came to Fergus, but not at Elora so far as I know." Thomson asks that Bishop Bethune consider his remarks confidential.

Thomson, C.E. (Charles Edward)

[1846-1850] from Abraham Nelles to Townley

Place: [Grand River]

From: A. Nelles

To: Townley

Details: 2pp

Notes: Reverend Abraham Nelles of the Mohawk Chapel for the Six Nations on Grand River writes to Reverend Adam Townley, thanking him for offering to give an account of the bishop's recent visit to the Mohawk. Rev. Nelles then relates some details of the visit and names some of the people who participated, including students of the Mohawk Institute school.

The letter is undated, but certain assumptions can be made.

  • Reverend Abraham Nelles refers to Reverend Adam Elliot, who took the position of missionary in the Grand River area in 1838.
  • Rev. Nelles then refers to the "young man Peter Martin who interpreted some of the speeches . . . & is now studying for ordination" which seems to be a reference to Oronhyatekha, the famous leader of the Independent Order of Foresters, who was baptized Peter Martin and attended the Mohawk Institute industrial school near the Grand River reserve from 1846–54.
  • "The chief who first addressed the Bishop is a Mohawk by name Johnson." This may be a reference to Chief John “Smoke” Johnson, who was well known for his oratorial gifts in the English and Mohawk languages. Smoke Johnson's son, George Henry Martin Johnson, served as interpreter for Rev. Elliot and lived with the missionary's family during the 1840s. Given the close relationship George Johnson had with the missionaries, it seems unlikely that he was the chief Rev. Nelles referred to by surname only.
    From these references, it appears this letter was written in the late 1840s.

Nelles, Abraham

1856 (Jan) from Edward Dewar to Townley

Place: Sandwich [now Windsor, ON]

From: Edward H. Dewar

To: Townley

Details: 3pp

Notes: Rev. Dewar and Rev. Adam Townley were co-editors of the “Churchman’s Friend” magazine. In this letter, Rev. Dewar writes about editorial matters, including the bursting of an envelope bound for Toronto, the decision to not include several articles in the coming issue, and the first complaint letter.

Dewar, Edward H.

1863 (Jan) from Adam Townley to Bishop Strachan

Date: January 1863, Epiphany

Place: Paris, C.W. [Canada West]

From: Adam Townley

To: The Honble and Right Reverend The Lord Bishop of Toronto

Details: 4 pp

Notes: The rough draft of a letter written by Reverend Townley to John Strachan, Bishop of Toronto. In the letter, Rev. Townley respectfully asks for a promotion.

Townley, Adam

1839 (May) from John Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudsons Bay House, London [England]

From: John Smith

To: The Revd John Smithurst, Church Missionary House, Salisbury Square [London, England]

Details: 1pp

Notes: This letter confirms a previous conversation between John Smith of Hudson's Bay House in London and Reverend John Smithurst. Rev. Smithurst is awarded the position of chaplain to the Hudson's Bay Company at Red River in Rupert's Land. He is granted passage from London to Fort Garry [modern-day Winnipeg].

1841 (Feb) from Anne Alsop and Catherine Wasse to Smithurst

Place: Sycamore Cottage [Derbyshire, England]

From: Anne Alsop & Catherine Wasse

To: The Reverend John Smithurst, Church Missionary. To be forwarded and properly directed from Islington

Delivery: Forwarded by the Church Missionary Society to Red River Settlement via Hudson's Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 4 pp (partly cross-written) + integral address face

Notes: Composite letter from friends Anne Alsop and her niece Catherine Wasse. Anne Alsop mentions Rev. Smithurst's brother George and family matters. Catherine Wasse writes about her impression of London, the renovations to Dethick Chapel, the success of her brother who is leasing Wakebridge Mine from Mr. Nightingale (the father of Florence Nightingale), Mr. Nightingale's annual visit, and the record-setting winter weather.

Alsop, Anne

1842 (Mar) from William Cockran to Smithurst

Place: [Grand Rapids?]

From: Wm Cockran

To: Rev. J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Details: 3pp with integral address

Notes: Reverend William Cockran writes to Rev. Smithurst regarding Rev. Cowley and his wife Mrs. Cowley, who have lodged with Rev. Cockran since they arrived in Rupert’s Land the previous autumn. Rev. Cockran describes the Cowleys as being ungracious guests who do not understand the expense of living in the Red River Settlement. Rev. Cockran also writes that he has severed ties to the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Church Missionary Society but will continue as if he will “continue here for life.” He finishes the letter by discussing the flour he is sending to Henry Budd at the Cumberland House Mission. He mentions that James Sandison and Henry Bird are assisting him.

Cockran, William

1842 (Dec) from Henry Budd to Smithurst

Place: Revier du Pas

From: Hy Budd

To: The Revd John Smithurst, Red River

Details: 3pp and integral address

Notes: Henry Budd writes to Rev. Smithurst with news. Mr. H. McKenzie arrived by boat and let Budd know that Rev. Smithurst arrived back in Red River safely, as well as bringing goods sent by Rev. Smithurst, including books, cloth, and tea. Budd discusses leather clothes for the Native children. Budd also mentions that he is "at a loss what to do with these children when they turn ill, having nothing of any kind to give them, but Salts." His brother-in-law, who was originally from Norway House, recently died after injuring himself with an axe and being unable to reach help.

Budd, Henry

1844 (May) from Daniel Aillud to Smithurst

Place: St. Paul's Cray Kent

From: Daniel Aillud

To: The Revd John Smithurst, Indian Settlement, Red River, Hudsons Bay, Nth America

Details: 2pp

Notes: Daniel Aillud writes to Rev. Smithurst requesting a character reference so that he can leave his work as a sailor on the “Prince Rupert” for the Hudson’s Bay Company. He also discusses the death of his father, who died while he was at sea.

1844 (Jun) from John Hargrave to Rev. John Smithurst

Place: Red River Settlement

From: John Hargrave (Hudson's Bay Company clerk factor)

To: Reverend John Smithurst

Details: 2pp

Notes: Hargrave, writing from York Factory, writes to Rev. Smithurst to let him that the articles Smithurst requested were delivered to the depot by Mr. Mowat. Hargrave also mentions that he would happily comply with Smithurst's request to supply all of the Church Missionary Society with whatever "gentleman and Mrs. Hunter" may need to be comfortable in the autumn months.

Hargrave, John

1845 (Sept) from James Hunter to Smithurst

Place: Cumberland Station, Rivière du Pas

From: James Hunter

To: The Revd J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement, Red River

Details: 3pp with integral address face

Notes: Reverend James Hunter writes to Rev. Smithurst. James Settee recently arrived at Cumberland Station [The Pas, MB] with his wife, family, and coincidentally with the carpenter hired by Rev. Hunter. He mentions Mr. Ross at Norway House. Rev. Hunter decided to keep the mission in its current location rather than move it to Cumberland Lake. He feels threatened by a Catholic missionary's activity in the area, referring to the man as "the Priest." This priest persuaded Wetus to convert to Roman Catholicism, but Rev. Hunter dismisses Wetus as “simply a Medicine man of which there are several here all equally as much claim to be considered Chiefs.” It is too late in the season for Settee to continue on to Rapid River [Lac la Ronge mission], so he will stay until the spring and assist Henry Budd and the carpenter in building Rev. Hunter a house. Rev. Hunter says he will “endeavour to manage Mrs. Settee as well as possible.”

Hunter, James

1846 (Aug) from James Hargrave to Rev. John Smithurst

Place: Red River Settlement

From: James Hargrave, York Factory

To: Reverend John Smithurst

Details: 2pp

Notes: A letter in which Hargrave writes about successfully arranging passage for another reverend and his wife to get to Red River. He also discusses the shipping of packages for Smithurst and Cowley that will be received by Mowat.


Mr. Hunter and Reverend Cockran are also mentioned. 


At the end of the letter Hargrave thanks Smithurst for his package of cucumbers and melons.

Hargrave, James

1847 (Jan & Apr) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d John Smithurst, R.R.S. [Red River Settlement]

Delivery: Forwarded to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and thence by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 1pp + integral address face

Notes: William Gregory Smith, a secretary at the Hudson’s Bay Company London office, acknowledges receipt of Smithurst’s letter dated August 4, 1846 containing two bills to be paid and credited to Mr. Cockran, also that six cases belonging to Mr. Cockran have arrived safely and “have not been lost sight of.”

An addition to the letter reads: “Your letter of the 17th Nov’r forwarded by Winter Packet has just come to hand. Sir George Simpson leaves tomorrow with the Express. I have therefore only time to say that every exertion shall be used to meet your wishes.”

Smith, William Gregory

1847 (Mar) from Richard Davies to Smithurst

Place: Church Missionary House [Islington, London, England]

From: Richard Davies

To: Brother Smithurst

Delivery: Forwarded by the Church Missionary Society to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 3pp on one sheet of paper.

Notes: Davies, a colleague of Smithurst’s in England, offers his thoughts and prayers to Smithurst as a letter from William Cochran has informed him that cholera has been rampant in the Red River district. Davies relates that dysentery claimed one of his own brothers in September. Davies also expresses hope that Mr. and Mrs. James have reached the Red River area safely and that Mr. James is able to relieve Smithurst of “some of the heavy duties which must have weighed on your mind as well as tried your physical powers.”

Other comments: “In many parts of Ireland too a severe pestilence is at this time raging and carrying off hundreds who hitherto have been spared by the grievous famine which has prevailed there and in some places in Scotland.”

[1847 (Jun)] Accounts from Church Missionary Society to Smithurst

Place: Church Missionary Society [London, England]

From: Church Missionary Society

To: Rev. J. Smithurst

Delivery: Forwarded by the Church Missionary Society to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: One (1) large sheet of paper + integral address face

Notes: An invoice, showing expenses and salary for the period May 31, 1846 to June 1, 1847.

Church Missionary Society

[ca. 1847] from Alexander Christie Jr. to Smithurst

Place: [Lower Fort Garry]

From: Alex[ander] Christie Jr.

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Carried by courier

Details: 1 pp + integral address face

Notes: Christie thanks Smithurst for the gift of pigeons, and sends 495 lbs. of beef, crediting Smithurst’s account. While the note is undated, Christie was posted to Red River in 1847 and was transferred to Edmonton some time in 1848.

Christie, Alexander Jr

1848 (May) from Duncan Finlayson to Smithurst

Place: Lachine

From: Dun: Finlayson

To: The Revd Jn Smithurst, Red River Settlement

Details: 2pp and integral address face

Notes: Duncan Finlayson writes to Rev. Smithurst. Sir George Simpson is travelling by steam to Sault de St. Marie soon. He answers questions about subscriptions to the New York Albion and the Church. Finlayson is startled by the new republics in France and Prussia, and the fear in Russia, Austria, and the Italian states. He also mentions that Ireland is in "a very disturbed State."

Finlayson, Duncan

1848 (Jul) from E.G. Gear to Smithurst

Place: Fort Snelling [Minnesota Territory]

From: E.G. Gear

To: The Rev. J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement, Red River

Delivery: Carried by courier (Peter Heyden)

Details: 1 pp + integral address face – written in pencil

Notes: Reverend E.G. Gear took the visit of Peter Heyden as an opportunity to send reading material to Rev. Smithurst, including the “English Churchman” and “Jesuits Letters.”

Gear, Ezekiel Gilbert

1848 (Sept) from William Mason to Smithurst

Place: Ross Ville

From: W. Mason

To: Rev. Mr. John Smithurst

Details: 1pp

Notes: Reverend William Mason sends the memoir of the late C. Atmore to Rev. Smithurst by way of Joe Bird. He also mentions "[y]our little Indian Work is in the press" referring to “A Vocabulary in English and Cree, compiled for the use of the Missionary Schools: Part First, Nouns” (Peel3 #257).

Mason, William

1849 (Jun) from E.G. Gear to Smithurst

Place: Fort Snelling

From: E.G. Gear

To: The Rev. J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement, Red River, British America

Details: 3pp and integral address face

Notes: Rev. Gear sends a letter to his friend via a military party headed to the U.S. border. Rev. Gear sends along reading material including magazines and a book about the new territories of New Mexico and California. Rev. Gear mentions the California gold rush, the revolutions in Europe, and the recent death of one of his daughters. A close friend, Dr. Rudor, has also died. Rev. Gear mentions that he preaches at a village called St. Paul's, and expects it will soon be named the government seat for the Minnesota Territory.

Gear, Ezekiel Gilbert

1849 (Jul) from John Ballenden to Smithurst

Place: Fort Garry

From: John Ballenden

To: Revd John Smithurst, Indian Mission, Red River Settlement

Details: 1pp and integral address face

Notes: John Ballenden acknowledges receiving a letter from Rev. Smithurst from June 29th. He agrees that they need to limit cooperation between the Half Breeds & Indians, but he will not be opening a store at the Indian Mission because he cannot find a responsible person to run it.

Ballenden, John

1850 (Jan & Apr) from W.G. Smith to Smithurst

Place: Hudson’s Bay House, London [England]

From: W.G. Smith

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, RRS [Red River Settlement]

Delivery: Forwarded to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier to the Indian Settlement at Netley Creek

Details: 2pp + integral address face

Notes: Hudson’s Bay Company secretary William Gregory Smith discusses a request by Rev. Smithurst to submit money to the Hudson's Bay Company for interest. As mentioned to Smithurst by Sir George Simpson, the Company can do so only for money earned through the company. Smith did approach the Governor and Committee on Smithurst’s behalf, but they refused the request.

Also mentioned is business regarding a Mr. Henry Cook and the property of his deceased father. A postscript dated April 3, 1850, indicates Smith received additional papers from Rev. Smithurst regarding the late Joseph Cook, presumably Henry Cook's father, but he does not have time to process these before the Spring Packet leaves London.

An additional note scrawled in a different handwriting is written on the integral address face and mentions Cook and money.

Smith, William Gregory

1851 (Jan) from Robert James to Smithurst

Place: [Grand] Rapids

From: Robert James

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Local courier

Details: 1pp + integral address face

Notes: Reverend Robert James conveys the bishop's [Bishop David Anderson] instructions to Reverend Smithurst that the Journals be sent by the next packet, which will be sent in mid-February. Reverend Cowley is also mentioned.

James, Robert

1851 (May) from John H. Johnson to Bishop David Anderson via Smithurst

Place: Liverpool [England]

From: John H. Johnson

To: To The Right Rev’d D. Anderson, Lord Bishop of Rupert’s Land, North West America

Delivery: Forwarded by the Christian Missionary Society to Red River Settlement via Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship and canoe brigade, and then by courier

Details: 4pp + 4 newsletters + addressed envelope

Notes: Johnson writes to Bishop David Anderson to propose establishing an annual donation from St. Andrew's Church in Liverpool, England to the Christian Missionary Society in Rupert's Land. Johnson hopes to establish a link between the two groups and he hopes to see the initial donation of 5£ be surpassed in future years. Johnson intends that this letter be sent to Reverend John Smithurst and be "left open for his perusal as probably he may have some suggestions to make before sending it to you."

With his letter, he includes four (4) issues of “St. Andrew’s Monthly Paper.” Each issue consists of a single sheet of paper that measures only 14.5 x 12 cm when unfolded. Includes February, March, April, and May issues for 1851.

Interesting facts: St. Andrew's Church is located on Renshaw Street. Reverend T.C. Cowan is Minister. Issues are printed by Richard C. Scragg, Printer, 75, Renshaw Street. The District of St. Andrew's has a population of "about 6,000." Average monthly attendance at the Day School and Sunday School is approximately 250 each, and is broken down for Boys, Girls, and Infants.

1851 (May) from James Settee to Smithurst

Place: Lac La Ronge, C.M.L. Station

From: James Settee

To: The Reverend J. Smithurst,
Indian Settlement (crossed out),
Church Missionary House, Salisbury Square, London (crossed out),
Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire

Details: 3pp and integral address face

Notes: James Settee writes to Rev. Smithurst on a number of matters. He says that Thomas Cook brought Rev. Smithurst's last letter to him and told Settee that Rev. Smithurst was suffering badly from rheumatism. Settee says both he and his wife also suffer from rheumatism, which he blames on the cold climate. Settee is about to leave on a long journey to Norway House, and he mentions that the baptized Natives object to working on Sundays, but Settee feels that the portages would be impossible without the help of the Hudson's Bay Company boats and so they must work on the Sabbath to keep up. The mission at Lac La Ronge is doing well, and Settee hopes to writes to Rev. Smithurst again once he reaches Norway House.

While written in May, this letter has a cancellation for Sault Ste Marie, C.W. in September. The letter then made its way to Church Missionary House in London, England where it was then redirected to Middleton, Wirksworth, Derbyshire.

Settee, James

1851 (Jun) from William Douglas Lane to Smithurst

Place: Lower Fort Garry

From: W[illiam Douglas] Lane

To: Rev’d J. Smithurst, Indian Settlement

Delivery: Local courier (probably Hudson’s Bay Company courier)

Details: 1pp + integral address face

Notes: A short letter by William Douglas Lane, Postmaster at Lower Fort Garry, discussing the payment of bills, refunding of money, and receipt of a flute.

Lane, William Douglas

1852 (Jan) from John Chapman to Rev. John Smithurst

Place: Salisbury Street, Ireland

From: John Chapman, Missionary at Middle Church

To: Reverend John Smithurst, 18 Salisbury Street, Ireland

Details: 2pp

Notes: Chapman thanks Smithurst for newspapers and of his letter detailing his route to New York. He also discusses the status of the congregation and the building of a new church.

Chapman, John

1857 (Jan) fragment from E.G. Gear to Smithurst

Place: Fort Snelling, Minnesota Territory

From: E.G. Gear

To: Rev & dear Brother [likely Rev. J. Smithurst]

Delivery: unknown

Details: Letter fragment. 4pp

Notes: While unsigned, this letter fragment is obviously authored by Rev. E.G. Gear, both from the address at Fort Snelling and from the unique handwriting. It was likely sent to Reverend John Smithurst. In this letter, Rev. Gear describes a riding accident where he broke his leg below the knee.

Gear, Ezekiel Gilbert

1857 (Apr and May) from W.H. Taylor to Smithurst

Place: Saint James, Assiniboia [Red River Settlement]

From: W. H. Taylor

To: Rev. J. Smithurst, Harriston [Ontario]

Delivery: Postal system in Canada

Details: 16pp + addressed envelope with postal marks

Notes: A long and detailed letter from Reverend William Henry Taylor of Saint James parish along the Assiniboine River. Rev. Taylor writes to Rev. John Smithurst, updating him on the Red River Settlement. Much of the news has to do with repairing the extensive damage caused by the great flood in 1852. No one seems to be able to find enough workers for these repairs.

Mentioned are:
Father E.G. Gear, who broke his leg.
Mr. Robert Logan and Mrs. Logan, who are living near where the flax mill stood.
Old Mr. Pritchard and his wife died.
Their son, Sam Pritchard, teaches at St. Paul's school. His brother, Arelui (?), married.
Mr. Smith the Collector and Mr. Pruden are briefly mentioned.
Rev. Abraham Cowley and Mrs. Cowley are mentioned multiple times. Rev. Cowley now has a Seraphine instrument which Mrs. Cowley plays during services. Rev. Cowley also has detailed plans for the repair and renovation of his church.
Archdeacon James Hunter now has a barrel organ at the Rapids church (also known as St. Andrew's).
Thomas Cook is catechist at Nepowewin mission. Rev. Henry Budd says the work there is difficult.
Rev. Robert Hunt is at English River, also known as the Stanley mission near Lac la Ronge, and he is building an expensive and impressive church.
Rev. Henry Budd is at The Pas with a young Rev. Henry George, but plans to leave for Nepowewin permanently in the Spring.
Rev. William Stagg is struggling at Manitoba.
Rev. Kirkby is still assistant at St. Andrew's.
McDonald is at Islington (White Dog) but has health problems.
Watkins is leaving Fort George possibly for Cumberland.
Rev. William Mason has success in his work, but following the Bishop's visit, disease broke out and killed multiple Natives. Small pox is rampant among the Plains people in the area of Beaver Creek and Touchwood Hills.
The steam mill is producing excellent flour.
Political unrest as renewal of the Hudson's Bay Company's charter is being debated in England. A Mr. Kennedy and Donald Gunn have written and circulated a petition to the Canadian Legislature urging them to become involved.

Taylor, William Henry

1857 (Oct) from the congregation of St. John’s Church, Elora

Place: Elora [Ontario]

From: the Congregation of St. John's Church, Elora

To: Rev’d John Smithurst

Delivery: unknown

Details: 2pp

Notes: Upon Rev. John Smithurst’s resignation from St. John's Church in Elora, on the grounds of his inability to continue to perform the duties of his office, his congregation presented this petition to him in appreciation of his contributions to them and their community.

The petition is signed by 29 parishioners. Two surnames could not be deciphered.

William Reynolds, Church Warden
John S. Crossman, Church Warden

John Burke
William Carter
George Crane
F Dalby
Thomas Farrow
Andrew Geddes
Thomas Greathead
D. Henderroll(?)
Edwin Henry Kertland
George W. Kirkendall
John J. Marten
Valentine McKenzie
John M. McLean
Edw H. Newman
Richard Newman
Robert M. Newman
Walter P. Newman
Philip Pepler
James Reynolds
William Reynolds
Hugh Roberts
James L. Ross
David Smith
David Smith Jr.
Henry Smith

1857 (Oct) from Bethune, Palmer & Osler to the Bishop of Toronto

Place: Guelph [Ontario]

From: A.N. Bethune, Archdeacon of York; Arthur Palmer, Rector of Guelph & Rural Dean; F.L. Osler, Rector of Ancaster cum Dundas & Rural Dean

To: Bishop of Toronto

Delivery: unknown

Details: 4pp (secretarial copy)

Notes: A copy of the report submitted by Bethune, Palmer, and Osler on their inquiry into John Smithurst’s absence from his missionary post at Elora in the county of Wellington in the diocese of Toronto. John Strachan, Bishop of Toronto, requested these men investigate the allegation that Reverend Smithurst abandoned his post without permission. Churchwardens William Reynolds and J.S. Crossman in Elora confirmed that Rev. Smithurst had been largely absent since the end of April, sometimes remaining only a week at a time. The Churchwardens said Rev. Smithurst was unable “to read or preach in a tone of voice audible to all the members of his congregation; but admitted that his bodily health was on the whole vigorous.” Andrew Geddes confirmed the frequent absence of Rev. Smithurst, who is said to have taken up residence in the township of Minto. The report recommends the Bishop demand Rev. Smithurst's resignation.

Bethune, Alexander Neil

1890, Jan 31 – Letter to Alf

Place: Byron, Ontario

From: Marion [Griffith]

To: Alf / T.A. Patrick M.D., Saltcoats, Assiniboia, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 8 pp + envelope, banded in black; note on envelope “No. 240;” obituary newspaper clipping for Mr. John Stephens.

Notes: Marion writes to her fiance, Alf [Dr. T.A. Patrick]. Marion describes the funeral arrangements for her grandfather, John Stephens. She repeatedly mentions how tired she feels and how she is suffering from headaches. Marion and her sister, Annie, continue their preparations for moving to Saltcoats, with the encouragement and support of their family.

She mentions that Annie will purchase the wedding ring for Alf and discusses the different shoes that she purchased. She plans to add the moccasins Alf had bought for her to her supply.

Patrick, Marion Griffith

1897, Nov 3 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: Alf [T.A. Patrick]

To: Mrs. Marion G. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1 pp of North West Territories letterhead + envelope

Notes: A short letter from Alf to his wife, Marion. He writes that she "acted very sensibly in not adding the M.L.A. to my address" and he "thinks it would be well to avoid doing so always." He then writes of his successful speech in the Legislative Assembly, which the newspapers the Regina Standard and the Regina Leader covered. He finishes his letter stating that he will move a motion that day regarding the Manitoba and North Western Railway.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1897, Nov 19 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina, N.W.T.

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Mrs. T.A. Patrick, Yorkton, N.W.T.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 9 pp, one sheet of paper is North West Territories letterhead & envelope

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife, Marion Patrick, while he waits for the House to open as Government is in council. He states that the Railway Committee's report will not be addressed until Monday. Unfortunate as Patrick had taken under his wing a Mr. Ferraro, a Hungarian delegate who had visited Yorkton, and a Mr. Forslund of the C.P.R. Land Department who had come to visit the Assembly. Unhappy with the Hungarians' location near Yorkton, Mr. Forslund gave most of them land grants. Mr. Ferraro decided to move to Edmonton.

Patrick further writes of the Speaker's dinner that night where one of the attendees is supposed to be the Hon. Clifford Sifton, Minister of the Interior. There is also an upcoming "Windsor Assembly Ball" to honour the Assembly members. Patrick finishes his first letter with "Mr. Haultain has arrived. The Speaker takes the chair."

He begins a new letter in the afternoon while waiting for a sleigh to take him to the House, expressing his worry about his family and his friends the Nelsons and the Christies. He advises that the children avoid Mrs. Head, regardless of the precautions she takes, and that the should be taken out for a walk everyday. He then jokes of his lack of progress in learning to waltz despite having lessons from Mrs. Hayes, the Librarian, Mrs Newlands, wife of the Registrar of Land Titles, and Miss Nimmins of the Normal School. Patrick reports that he finished drafting a report for the Select Committee on Railways and must begin drafting a Village Ordinance.

Patrick writes later that evening that Clifford Sifton will not be in attendance at the ball and again on Saturday morning he writes to inform his wife that the members of the assembly were invited to Commissioner Herchmen's home to meet Mr. Sifton. Later still on Sunday, he continues his letter to comment on the new Government's need to prepare legislation following the election.

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1902, Mar 22 – Letter to Marion

Place: Winnipeg

From: Alf [T.A. Patrick]

To: Mrs. Marion G. Patrick, Yorkton, Assa.

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 1pp typewritten letter on Hotel Leland, Winnipeg letterhead. Envelope is printed with “Hotel Leland, Winnipeg, proprietor W.D. Douglas.” Address is typed.

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife, Marion, that he has been busy "loafing" around Winnipeg since his arrival there. He mentions that he had lunch with Sanford Evans, editor of the Telegram, who had wrote "one of the articles on Territorial Autonomy in the last number of the Canadian Magazine." He states that he had to refuse to say anything for publication but that the discussion resulted in Evans agreeing to send a Telegram correspondent to Regina to write up the debates.

Patrick states that "the Nord-Westen (German) is a convert to my views and kindly consented to give reports of my work at Regina at full length without asking anything for doing it. This is unusual in a German newspaper." He then reports that he attended a the Winnipeg medical society "to hear and see a lecture on Neilsen's stomach and liver."

Patrick also had diner with H. A. Robson, late deputy attorney general of the North West Territories, and they chatted about Regina and the North West Government, which Robson thought "worthy of condemnation." Patrick reports that Robson assured him "that the opinions expressed to the Devils Lake school district in respect of the assessment of Doukhobortsi were wrong and that the opinion I expressed to them was right."

He finish his letter stating, "I expect a fighting session and will probably have given and received hard blows before I see you again."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1903, Aug 21 – Letter to Marion

Place: Pembroke, Ont[ario]

From: T.A. Patrick

To: Marion [G. Patrick]

Details: 3pp on lined Copeland House, Pembroke Ont. letterhead

Notes: T.A. Patrick writes to his wife while in Ontario. He tells his wife that he arrived in Pembroke and drove to Rankin on the hunt for old Mr. Gulke. Patrick had his "mind made up to offer him $1000.00" but he learned "that Dan Hoffmann of Ebenezer had offered him one hundred dollars, and it was not long until" they "closed a deal for $200.00 for the half section."

Patrick further writes that in buying the land, he "was in doubt as to the liability of the late son's estate to the company which sold him and Galling and Martin Kielow the threshing outfit." He tells his wife that she would remember "Mrs. Kielow's telling [her] that they (Kielows) only finished paying this year." Patrick states, "in any case there is a big thing in it even if I make nothing out of the deceased son's quarter section. I do not know whether the other two daughters are entitled to share in their dead brother's estate and believe they are not." He continues, "the interesting position that I know I have made on the deal something between $1000.00 and $2500.00 bu am not certain how much."

He informs his wife that he will reach Toronto and Hamilton by the next night and states that he is "doing so well that [he] shall push inquiries into the 800 acre estate at Hamilton before returning even if it takes two or three days."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

1903, Nov 17 – Letter to Marion

Place: Regina [N.W.T.]

From: Alf [T.A. Patrick]

To: Mrs. Marion G. Patrick, Byron, Middlesex Co., Ont[ario]

Delivery: Canada Post, postmarked

Details: 2 pp on lined North West Territories letterhead and envelope. Third sheet of paper has Asian characters written on it.

Notes: Alf [T.A. Patrick] writes a letter to his wife while she is away in Ontario. He writes that "it is nearly four o clock pm, an hour later than Yorkton time and daylight is rather scarce. We are having but not enjoying a real cold snap with more wind than enough. My bronchitis is worse owing to sitting yesterday too long in this cold legislative chamber." He later writes that "the provincial autonomy resolution comes on tomorrow," and then states that he encloses "a letter from George. Tell him a Chinaman wrote-it." He finishes his letter saying, "there is a rumour now that the elections are coming on in January."

Patrick, Thomas Alfred

Copy of Jan 9, 1889 Police Report of Calgary Saloon Inspections

Three page copy of a Calgary police report written by Sergeant Ernest Cochrane to the Officer Commanding “E” Division. Sergeant Cochrane summarizes the alcoholic beverages and permits found during his searches conducted the afternoon of January 9, 1889 of Alberta Saloon, D. Cameron’s Saloon, and Pullman. He includes brand names, permit numbers, names on permits, and the number of both whole and broken bottles.
Sergeant Cochrane points out that 8 bottles of gin were found in Pullman in a search conducted December 28, 1888 but that Pullman now has 11 whole bottles and 1 broken bottle of gin while still producing the same permit number seen in the previous search. “This shows an increase of . . . 3 bottles and no new permit to cover the evident augmentation of quantity.” Sergeant Cochrane writes that “[m]y only hope is the possibility of stopping the supply in transit.”

Two (2) Prince Albert Times Newspaper Clippings

The headline of the first article reads: "Magistrate's Cotrt. / Queen vs. Leslie." A typewritten note on the back of the paper identifies the newspaper as the Prince Albert Times dated December 2, 1987 [presumably a typo for 1887].

The case involves charges of vagrancy against Constable A. Leslie of the North West Mounted Police. Constable Leslie was found at night lurking in a stable belonging to Mr. T. Oram of the Queen’s Hotel.

The second clipping lacks a headline. It is an editorial comment on the Queen vs. Leslie court case. A typewritten note on the back identifies the newspaper as the Prince Albert Times dated December 2, 1887.

"While we are opposed to the principle of the present liquor law, we agree that so long as it is in force it is the duty all good citizens to assist the authorities in legitimate endeavors to carry it out, but when constables - whether on duty or not - put themselves in positions where they might very properly be taken for sneak thieves or burglars, and when interrogated as to their business refuse to give a satisfactory account of themselves, they not only make themselves amenable to the law, but naturally and rightly prejudice the minds of people against them and against their superiors, under whose orders they may be acting, as well as against the law itself.”
“The Mounted Police Force has done good work in the earlier days of its existence, but it has outlived its usefulness as a force. Now that the Territories are becoming settled and municipal organizations springing up, the carrying out of the laws should be left to the purely civil authorities. And if it is found necessary to have an armed body to preserve peace amongst the Indians, that body should be a purely military force.”

"Some Detectives" Clipping from the Lethbridge News June 21, 1888

An editorial extract from the Lethbridge News of 21st June 1888.

“Some Detective” headline is underlined in red. Referring to the North West Mounted Police, the writer asserts that “[t]he long-talked-of detective service has apparently fizzled down into a staff of whiskey informers.” Also comments on the unfair nature of the exemption the Canadian Pacific Railway has obtained from the liquor laws.

“Cafeteria and Bath House Raided by the Police Last Night” clipping from Calgary Daily Herald

“Cafeteria and Bath House Raided by the Police Last Night” newspaper clipping from the Calgary Daily Herald dated Monday, April 24, 1911.

“The Calgary police, in conjunction with the provincial license inspectors, made raids early Sunday morning on the Cafeteria and Moose Baxter’s bath house. The raids were conducted by Chief Mackie in person, and reflect great credit on the department for the methodical and successful manner in which they were carried out.”

During the police raid on the Turkish bath house, one of three clients found bathing was in fact an undercover license inspector, who “had been quietly investigating for the past two weeks, as a result of which he located the liquor in a sack at the bottom of the plunge.”

Symposium on Analytical Chemistry Group Photograph

Caption reads: "Symposium on Analytical Chemistry in honor of professor Walter E Harris on the occasion of his retirement from the University of Alberta August 15, 1980". The Symposium was organized by the analytical group at the University of Alberta. It consisted of eighteen presentations by Harris' fellow colleagues from across North America.

Harris in Academic Gown

Harris after the University of Waterloo's fifty-fourth Convocation wearing academic hood and gown. Pictured here with Chancellor James Hadsworth; [?]; WAE (Pete) McBryde, former Dean of Science; and Douglas Wright, President of Waterloo.

Harris with Family and Friends

Harris wearing his Order of Canada medal surrounded by family and friends on November 7, 1988. The "family show and tell" celebration was organized by Harris' daughter Margaret in honour of him becoming a member of the Order of Canada.

PE004911 - Luther College of Regina Report Card

College report card for Elsie Mills Dunnet certifying her grades at the Luther College of Regina in her second year of “Arts and Science.” The grades are listed next to the courses that the student undertook. It is signed by the registrar, H. Schmidt.

PE004901 - Program for Royal Alexandra Hospital Alumni Event

Program - R.A.H. Alumni Event (Royal Alexandra Hospital Alumnae Association). The cover contains an drawn black and white illustration of a nurse holding a parchment with the words “RAH Alumnae” written on it. The program is handwritten in black ink and has decorative purple and yellow strings tied along the spine.

PE000608 - Farm Account Book prepared by the Dept. of Farm Management, College of Agriculture, Univ. of Saskatchewan

Farm Account Book prepared by the Department of Farm Management, College of Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan. This account book was used by Roger Carlton of Benson, Saskatchewan for his Farm Management II class. It is partially filled in with information dated between 1940 and 1941, likely from examples used in class. The cover of the book says “revised November 1948.”

PE000931 - Sacred Heart Academy Graduation Ball program

Front cover contains a leaf motif on the left hand side, and states: Sacred Heart Academy Graduation Ball C.Y.C Hall, May 12th, 1950 9:00 to 12:00. Sponsored by Sacred Heart Academy & College Alumnae.  The interior is titled "Programme," and has 12 blank lines, under which are varying titles, (e.g. Freshman’s Fight, Scholars’ Scoot, Basketball Bounce, etc). Three of the blank lines above these titles have been filled in by hand with a pencil, and include the names of: Jack Hamilton, Emmett Reid, S. Gardner. The back of the programme is blank. 

PE001062 - Big Game Winter Range Survey Crowsnest Forest Reserve

A study of the grasses, forbs and shrubs of the Crowsnest Forest Reserve, in support of understanding the reserve’s contemporary use as a grazing range for wild and domestic animals. Using the point sample method, the authors describe the plant density and composition in four pre-selected areas in the reserve. Additionally included is a background description of the reserve, conclusions, recommendations, a list literature cited, and appendices with vegetational analysis data for each selected area.

Mitchell, G.J.

PE000808 - 1945 "The Story of Canadian Wheat" by Saskatchewan Cooperative Producers Ltd

Account titled "The Story of Canadian Wheat" written by Saskatchewan Cooperative Producers Limited.  Details the processes and stages involved in wheat production in Canada. It includes black and white photographs of working farmers to complement the text. The cover contains the title against a background sepia photograph of farmers ploughing.

Saskatchewan Co-operative Producers

PE000812 - 1943 “The Story of Canadian Wheat” by Saskatchewan Cooperative Wheat Producers Ltd

Pamphlet titled “The Story of Canadian Wheat” and published by the Saskatchewan Cooperative Wheat Producers Limited after a policy change was issued in order to suspend trading in wheat on the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, while allowing the Canadian Wheat Board to take delivery of all wheat and to make an initial advance to farmers of $1.25 per bushel for “No. 1 Northern wheat.” Pamphlet is 8-pages long and extolls the quality of Canadian wheat and describes the various stages of its production; it also includes illustrations to complement the text.

Saskatchewan Co-operative Producers

PE000815 - “A Call to Action” pamphlet by the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool

Pamphlet titled “A Call to Action” providing a review of the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool objectives by the Saskatchewan Cooperative Producers Limited since 1924.  Sections include:

  • the on-to-Ottawa delegation,
  • efforts to make pool facilities available to membership,
  • the problem of car allocation,
  • the return to the grower from pool earnings,
  • the implications of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Saskatchewan Co-operative Producers

PE000883 - Collection of pamphlets from the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool

Pamphlets, titled: "Wheat Pool Committee Program," or simply "Committee Program," issued by the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool in Regina, Saskatchewan. Some are tri-fold, some quad-fold, and some are booklets. Topics range, and include: organization and operation of the wheat pool, meeting minutes, pool elevator deliveries, livestock pool, pool policies, Co-operative education and studies of the co-operative movement, relations with other co-operative associations and junior organizations, The Western Producer Circulation, The Saskatchewan Federation of Agriculture, committee conventions, boxcar allocation, flour sales.

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool

PE000923 - "Addresses by Junior U.F.A. President and Vice-President to the U.F.A Convention" 

Booklet titled: "Addresses by Junior U.F.A. President and Vice-President to the U.F.A Convention." Below this is written: "Masonic Temple, Edmonton-January, 1936." Cover is printed on plain white paper with black writing. Front cover contains a black border with the title within this border, and a small image consisting of a torch with a ribbon wrapped around it and tied in a bow. The five (5) pages that follow detail the addresses given by the Junior President and Vice-President of the United Farmers Association Co-op at the convention. A small publishing mark on the back cover noted: Allied Printing Edmonton-Trades Council-Union Label. 

PE000924 - "United Farmers of Alberta Annual Convention, 1916 - Calgary - Annual Address"

Booklet titled: "United Farmers of Alberta Annual Convention, 1916-Calgary-Annual Address." Below this is written: "Delivered by S.S. Dunham. L.L.B., Lethbridge-Second Vice-President." 

Cover is printed on light brown paper with blue flecks. Front cover features a black decorative border surrounding an image of a torch entwined with a ribbon alongside the title. The back cover contains only the union label for printing, and notes: Quick Print, Calgary. The interior contains fifteen (15) pages denoting the address given by S.S. Dunham at the annual U.F.A. Convention in Calgary. There is also a b&w portrait of S.S. Dunham on the second page.

PE004824 - “The Search for Security” pamphlet by the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool

Pamphlet titled “The Search for Security” that describes “vital points about the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool and its policies.” The document provides an overview as to the way in which the Pool was created and organized, its purposes, and its relationship with farmers and governments, as well as a brief account of its financial records and the industry’s impact on Canadians’ living standards. Published by the Saskatchewan Co-operative Producers Limited. The cover is printed on blue paper and contains an illustration comprised of a farmhouse, a barn, a grain elevator, a boat, a train, and the legislature.

Saskatchewan Co-operative Producers

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