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1700—1749

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1700 and 1749.

1800—1809

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1800 and 1809.

1810—1819

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1810 and 1819.

1820—1829

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1820 and 1829.

1830—1839

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1830 and 1839.

1840—1849

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1840 and 1849.

1850—1859

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1850 and 1859.

1860—1869

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1860 and 1869.

1870—1879

This series contains all items in the collection created between 1870 and 1879.

Aboriginal Rights

The Aboriginal Rights series consists of 10 subseries arranged by subject, based on supplied subject titles. Materials were created between 1939 and 2012. This series contains research, background material, and government publications on aboriginal peoples in Canada and the Indian Act. Overall, this series addresses two main issues: first, equal status rights for aboriginal men and women, and second, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Additional topics include: aboriginal self-government, aboriginal women’s groups, amending the Indian Act for discrimination, the effect of the constitution on aboriginal rights, interpretation of history, land claims and land development, inheritance and estate administration for people who live on reserves, a scandal surrounding corruption at Petroglyph Provincial Park in Ontario, aboriginal rights in respect to Quebec sovereignty, solidarity between bands and nations, government relations and policies with respect to various aboriginal groups, bands, and nations, Elijah Harper effectively ending the Meech Lake Accord, and missing and murdered aboriginal women.

The fight for the equal rights of aboriginal women was largely spearheaded by Mohawk activist Mary Two-Axe Earley from Kahnawake, Quebec, who fought for aboriginal equality issues in band politics and with the federal government. Under the Indian Act, aboriginal women lost their Indian status if they married a man who did not have status, however a woman would gain status if she married an aboriginal man who held status. If a woman married a man from a different band they would lose their band status. Court cases fighting to amend the Indian Act so that status could not be taken away were appealed all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada, fought by Mary Two-Axe Early, Jeannette Lavell, Yvonne Bedard, and Vivian Corbiere Lavell. Marguerite Ritchie and the HRI supported these court cases and offered research aid. Marguerite Ritchie also counted Mary Two-Axe Earley as a personal friend. After the courts amended the Indian Act so as not to discriminate against women, activism continued to change band policies that allowed male band leaders to refuse to accept women back onto reserves even if they had status.

The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples reviewed the relocation of Inuit families from the Quebec coast of Hudson’s Bay to the high arctic in Grise Fiord and Resolute Bay in the early 1950s. The Royal Commission was called after the children of the relocated Inuit families accused the government of wrongdoing and asked for compensation. The Commission looked into the alleged reasons for the relocations including claims that the Inuit faced starvation and claims that the Cold War era government wanted people living in the high arctic so they would have a stronger land claims. The Commission also gathered testimony on the RCMP officers who oversaw the relocations and the town store for instances of exploitation or wrongdoing. Royal Commissions do not lay charges against those they feel have committed wrongdoings. The HRI and Marguerite Ritchie felt the Royal Commission did not have a high enough standard of proof for testimonies given and that the government, Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, and the RCMP were being misrepresented to and by the Commission. Bent Gestur Sivertz, Commissioner of the Northwest Territories at the time of the relocations, maintained throughout that the Inuit who were relocated were happy and healthy and fared better in the long run than many of the Inuit who had not been relocated. Historian Gerard Kenney wrote a book entitled “Arctic Smoke and Mirrors” based on the government’s archive from the period, supporting the position of the HRI and Marguerite Ritchie and dismissing charges that the relocations were related to Cold War land claims. Marguerite Ritchie believed the Inuit who asked for a Royal Commission to be called were only trying to receive monetary compensation and did not have substantiated claims. Marguerite Ritchie was a personal friend of Bent Gestur Sivertz. This series contains significant documentation and testimony from the government perspective on the relocations, but does not address Inuit claims in significant detail.

Academic Administration

The files in this series consist of annual reports to Faculty of Science including list of: grad students, papers, lectures, addresses, funding, professional acitivities, societies and university activities.

Lemieux, Raymond

Academic Career.

Series consists of records documenting Peacock's student career at the University of Alberta. There are also some records from Peacock's graduate studies at the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh. The records are in chronological order.

Peacock, Gordon

Academic planning and development: curriculum, proposed School of Architecture and School of Social Work, department of Geography, evening, special and spring sessions records

Includes curriculum (1920-1954); proposed School of Architecture (1960-1964); Department of Geography (1948-1950); proposed School of Social Work (1964-1966); reports and minutes pertaining to evening, special and summer sessions.

Faculty of Arts and Science

Academic Pursuits.

Archival Description: The records in this series document J. Peter Meekison’s academic pursuits, including some of his own student notebooks while attending Duke University, and records associated with his career at the University of Alberta. The records are textual and in good physical condition.

Scope and Content: This is the smallest series in the fonds, and has been sub-divided into the following two sub-series: Student records and University of Alberta records. Within the University records, are early and later teaching documents, Vice-President (Academic) administrative files; projects and special program files, and reference files. Included also are University Committee files that Dr. Meekison administered or participated on.

The series title is based on the contents of records.

Archival Description: The records in this series document J. Peter Meekison’s academic pursuits, including some of his own student notebooks while attending Duke University, and records associated with his career at the University of Alberta. The records are textual and in good physical condition.

Scope and Content: This is the smallest series in the fonds, and has been sub-divided into the following two sub-series: Student records and University of Alberta records. Within the University records, are early and later teaching documents, Vice-President (Academic) administrative files; projects and special program files, and reference files. Included also are University Committee files that Dr. Meekison administered or participated on.

The series title is based on the contents of records.

Series 3 consists of J. Peter Meekison’s constitutional material, documenting his role as Minister of the Alberta Government Department of Federal and Inter-Governmental Affairs, and his subsequent work as a Constitutional Adviser for the Alberta Government. The records are textual, with one video tape recording, and are in excellent physical condition. The arrangement of the records is essentially chronological, with an original file plan followed for organizing a large section of the earlier records found in this series.

Series three consists of Peter Meekison’s Constitutional material and is further arranged within four sub-series. The first sub-series is arranged according to an original color-coded file scheme applied when the files were current. The color-coded files include briefing books, ‘process and position’ files, administrative arrangements, transcripts, reports and news articles, etc. related to various First Minister meetings, and committee meetings surrounding the constitutional reform discussions. Many of these files were created while Peter Meekison was Minister of Alberta Federal and Inter-Governmental Affairs and relate to the amending of the Constitution Act in 1982. A set of coded files is included in this series which addresses non-Constitutional issues his Ministry was dealing with. In his capacity as constitutional adviser to the provincial government post 1984, there is material related to the Senate Reform Task Force meetings, and the constitutional committee work leading to the Meech Lake Accord discussions and the 1992 Charlottetown Accord. Included in this series are numerous constitutional background material files which provide further insight into the constitutional process and debate, and numbered documents related to the 1992 Constitutional Accord.

The series title is based on the contents of records.

The textual records in this series contain material related more generally to Peter Meekison’s professional career, which is relevant to both his research interests with the Department of Political Science at the University, and his constitutional work with the Government of Alberta. The material includes correspondence files, meeting minutes and documents, papers and some published material as well as small bound appointment diaries. The records are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically within each sub-series and are in good physical condition.

The records in this series provide an overview of the many professional activities J. Peter Meekison actively juggled in his academic and administrative career. There are six sub-series within the series, further documenting these activities. Included are correspondence files, organized into the chronological files maintained by Meekison while serving as Deputy-Minister and then Minister of the Department of Federal and Inter-Governmental Affairs; general correspondence files; and ‘people’ correspondence files maintained alphabetically by sir-name of the correspondent. Other sub-series include professional association and related committee and board work files; conference and workshop participation files; writing and publishing records; and personal appointment books. Finally, a series of reference/research files is maintained in this series, organized alphabetically by subject title, and used by Meekison in both his teaching and consultation work.

The series title is based on the contents of records.

The records in this series related to J. Peter Meekison’s position as a Commissioner on the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, one of the largest Royal Commissions established by the Federal Government. The records consists of meeting documents, inquiry submissions, briefing books and reports and are in excellent physical condition.

This record series is broad and encompasses many aspects of a Royal Commission of Inquiry. The series is further organized into eight sub-series, documenting meeting minutes and records; the writing and editing of final RCAP reports; policy team files; public hearings and copies of written submissions to the Commission; reports; Commission administrative records; and background information and reference documents. The series contents provide a wealth of information about both the work and process involved in undertaking a Royal Commission Inquiry, as well as providing a rich resource of information and research results on the history and culture of Canada’s aboriginal people.

The series title is based on the contents of records.

Meekison, J. Peter

Academic Writings

Series consists of draft and unpublished articles by several authors, usually about an aspect of African literature. Series is arranged alphabetically by the name of the author.

Administration

The Administrative records cover a period from 1980 to 1996 and document Chinook and Fringe Theater eras. They include minutes of the Board of Directors, various committee minutes, correspondence, financial statements, fund raising files, marketing reports, feasibility studies and on-site survey results. The records are grouped chronologically into five categories reflecting different administrative activities: Board of Directors work; general administration; financial duties; fund raising; and various reports.

Administration

The Administrative records cover a period from 1980 to 1996 and document Chinook and Fringe Theater eras. They include minutes of the Board of Directors, various committee minutes, correspondence, financial statements, fund raising files, marketing reports, feasibility studies and on-site survey results. The records are grouped chronologically into five categories reflecting different administrative activities: Board of Directors work; general administration; financial duties; fund raising; and various reports.

Administration

Includes election results (1908, 1927-1929); retirement dinner for President W. H. Johns (sound tape recording, 1969); and correspondance.

Office of the Chancellor and Senate

Administrative Records

Series consists of five correspondence files addressing a variety of administrative concerns. Much of the correspondence is written to or from Gordon Peacock, in his capacity as Associate Professor of Drama. The series also includes annual reports and interdepartmental memorandums. Correspondents also include significant theatre personalities including H.G. Glyde and Betty Mitchell. The series title is based on the content of the records.

University of Alberta Studio Theatre

Admissions

The Post-Secondary Learning Act of Alberta gives General Faculties Council (GFC) responsibility, subject to the authority of the Board of Governors, over "academic affairs" (section 26(1)) and over "standards and policies respecting the admission of persons to the university as students" (section 26(1)(n)). Further, the Post-Secondary Learning Act gives the Board of Governors authority over "admission requirements" (sections 60(1)(c) and (d)). The Board has delegated its authority over admission requirements to GFC. The Post-Secondary Learning Act of Alberta gives Faculty Councils power to “provide for the admission of students to the faculty” (29(1)(c)). The admission requirements for any Faculty is approved by GFC and published in the current edition of the University Calendar.

The responsibility for admissions decisions is vested in the Faculty Admission Committees or in the Deans of the respective Faculties, as the councils of such Faculties will determine. The responsibility for admission decisions for Open Studies remains in the Office of the Registrar and Student Awards.

The Office of the Registrar, as Chair of the original Admissions Committee, served as the first principle administrative entity responsible for admissions. As the university student body and administrative structure grew, responsibility for admissions was distributed through various faculties, the Senate, and the General Faculties Council. Until 1969, when authority was transferred to the newly created Secretariat's Office, the Registrar served as Secretary of the General Faculties Council, the principle oversight body for admissions. The Registrar remains an ex-officio member of this council and continues to supply policy advice and execute admissions policy for the University. The principal admissions activities include: liaison (high school and college), access, information distribution, orientation, application processing, document evaluation, and transfer credit.

The records in this series reflect the distributed authority of the admissions functions. Predominantly textual, the records consists of committee meeting minutes, interdepartmental correspondence, correspondence with student applicants, deliberation on policy formulation including research, consultation with other schools, and advice to councilors and high schools concerning matriculation and admission requirements.

Office of the Registrar and Student Awards

Archaeology

Records of archeological field studies conducted by Arthur through universities in Montana, Saskatchewan and Alberta, in addition to general archaeological information and research files.

Archive Binders

The archives binders concern the period from 1980 to 1983 when the theatre group was known as the Chinook Touring Theatre. The binders are arranged chronologically and include clippings, promotional materials, photographs, press releases, and miscellaneous records from various shows.

Archive Binders

The archives binders concern the period from 1980 to 1983 when the theatre group was known as the Chinook Touring Theatre. The binders are arranged chronologically and include clippings, promotional materials, photographs, press releases, and miscellaneous records from various shows.

Art .

Contains correspondence regarding art work and designs.

Articles

96-165-158-I to 96-165-158-XXVIII
This collection contains over five hundred articles written in Croatian, Serbian, English, and German, on all aspects of Andric's life, work and diplomatic career. There are original offprints, excerpts and newspaper clippings, as well as photocopies, with handwritten annotations and research notes, as well as essays and papers in typescript.

Associate Vice-President’s (AVP) Office (Research).

Series 3 is a small series of textual records documenting Byron Kratochvil’s association with the office of Vice-President (Research) in his roles as Associate Vice-President from 1995-1998, and as senior advisor to the Vice-President (Research) from 1998-2001.

The records in this series consist of Kratochvil’s personal meeting notes and correspondence, and are arranged chronologically within each file..

The series title is based on the content of the records.

Associations, Committees and Boards.

This series consists of textual records and photographs. The photographs were removed from a sticky plastic sheet album, although original order and annotations were retained. The records are in good shape, and arranged in chronological order within sub-series designations. This series of records includes papers and photographs associated with the various committees, boards, and associations L.H. Thomas was involved with. The largest sub-series of records within this series is the National Historic Sites and Monuments Board on which L.H. Thomas sat as the Alberta representative for two terms (1968-1976). Smaller sub-series include: University of Alberta Committees, Archives-related committees and boards, historical associations, research foundations, funding organizations, and conferences.

The series title is based on the contents of records.

Audio Recordings

Series consists of interviews with African authors (famous and unknown), scientists, and women of distinction. They represent the entire interviewing "oveure" of Lee Nichols of the Voice of America from the 1960's to the 1990's. The 8" tapes were edited for broadcast to Africa. They exist in three other libraries in the world. The 11" tapes are raw interviews (unedited) and no other copies exist anywhere. There are also some interviews with Caribbean authors and related music performances.

Audio Tapes.

The series consists of three audiocassettes. The cassettes concern interviews, demo tapes for commercial use and a song.

Audio-Visual Records.

The material in Series 8 includes the audio-visual material Wilfred Watson collected. It is a small series, consisting of 11 tape cassettes, 5 reel-to-reel tapes, 4 videotape recordings, and 334 photographic items. The material is in very good physical condition.

The audio-visual material, although not extensive, helps to present a fuller picture of Wilfred Watson. The photographs include photographs of Watson's immediate family including his parents, sister Jean, and other family members. There are two lovely portraits of a young Sheila Watson, and several formal portraits of Wilfred Watson taken while he was in his 30s and 40s. There are also some lovely photographs, many taken by Jorge Frascara, of Wilfred at his home in Nanaimo, B.C. Several of Frascara's photographs were mounted in a special album and titled "Cowback and so Much More". A friend, Pauline Boote, took some wonderful photographs of the 'heads' Watson created from painting on driftwood. As well, there are snapshots of friends (and their children) included with correspondence, and a large number of 'play' photographs (play production prints and proofs). The sound recordings are limited, and some of the material remains unidentified. The tapes, both sound and video, relate almost totally to Wilfred Watson's work and includes sound tracks and recordings of plays or Watson-related material readings.

The series title is based on the contents of records.

AV Recordings.

The audio-visual records consist of video-tapes, compact discs, and tape recordings. They are quite recent, and their quality is good.

The audio-visual records relate to the previous six series but are described in a separate series to accommodate their unique format. The majority of the items are VHS videotapes, often consisting of tapes of television talk programs on which Mel Hurtig appeared. Interview topics include free trade discussions, National Party policies, publishing topics, and Hurtig’s books. There are recordings of conference speeches and Hurtig lectures and speeches. A very few personal items are included but most of the audio-visual items in the series relate to issues Hurtig was involved with

Titles based on content of recording.

Awards

The University Senate began to administer student awards in the first year of the school’s existence. The Senate reported in its second meeting in July 1908, that competition for the Scholarship Matriculation examination suffered from few matriculated students eligible to sit the exam. As a result, only one student, Mr. Charles F. Reilly of Calgary, wrote the exam and “accordingly” won the scholarship. The Senate requested the donors of the $100 scholarship continue to offer the award. The donors, A.W. Dougall, and University President Alexander Cameron Rutherford, agreed (Senate Minutes, vol. 0, p.38, U.A.A.). The Board of Governors first formally addressed administration of student awards on December 13th, 1918 when it passed a motion to appropriate $200 "from the University Fund for scholarship purposes." (BofG Minutes, vol. 0/17, p. 252, U.A.A.). The Registrar's Office was originally charged with administering bursaries and awards. In 1959-60 the Registrar ceased to be directly responsible for the administration of scholarships and bursaries. In that year the responsibility was transferred to the newly established Office of the Administration of Student Awards. Responsibility, as it concerns all students other than graduate students registered in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, for making rules and regulations respecting academic awards shall be delegated by General Faculties Council to the Executive Committee. (G.F.C. 02 DEC 1966). Responsibility for the administration of awards has been delegated to the Office of Student Awards in the Office of the Registrar. The series consists of documentation of student awards administered by the Office of the Registrar.

Office of the Registrar and Student Awards

Awards

The 73 files comprising this series represent the public recognition Dr. Lemieux received for his contribution to scientific research in the discipline of Chemistry. Included in his list of accolades is the Order of Canada (1968) , the Wolf Prize in chemistry (1999), King Faisal International Award for Science (first Canadian) (1990), The Tishler Award, Harvard University (1983), Hawarth Award and Medal (1983), the Albert Einstein World Award of Science (1992), the NSERC Gold Medal Award (1991), C.S. Hudson Award of the American Chemical Society (1966), the Canadian Medical Association Medal of Honour, and many others. Included with the awards are letters of congratulations and the consultation files of awards committees.

Lemieux, Raymond

Beadle's Pocket Novels

Series consists of one Beadle's Pocket Novel.

Publisher: Beadle and Adams

Date of First Issue (No. 1): July 7, 1874
Date of Last Issue (No. 272): November 25, 1884

In collection (No. 191): October 18, 1881

The format is 6 1/2 x 4 1/4 inches, with 100 pages. Novels cost 10 cents. Front wrapper has series name, title of novel, and a coloured illustration, surrounded by a plain tinted background--either blue, green, orange, or gray. All the books are reprints of various Beadle publications.

Beatrix Potter and Peter Rabbit

This series consists of materials collected by Dr. Margaret Mackey and donated to the University of Alberta Libraries. It contains diverse representations and interpretations of Beatrix Potter's 1902 book The Tale of Peter Rabbit and its sequels. It contains fictional and non-fiction books in a variety of formats relating to Beatrix Potter and her character Peter Rabbit, a collection of ephemeral materials, video adaptations on DVD and VHS, electronic games and other computer software, audiobooks on cassette tape, and various collectibles. This series consists of the following subseries: Books (1955-2013), Video (1971-2008), Electronic Games and Software (1993-1995), Collectibles (1983-2012), Catalogues (1992-2000), Audio Recordings (1978-1995), Ephemera (1987-2011), and Personal Files (1971-2007).

Beti, Mongo – Criticism and interpretation

Series consists of articles by and about the Cameroon writer Mongo Beti. Professor Arnold obtained much of this material via Inter Library Loan and many of the articles are in French. Material in this series was compiled for his unpublished bibliography (see Series 7). An abbreviated version of the bibliography was published as an appendix (p. 425-444) to Stephen H. Arnold, ed. Critical Perspectives on Mongo Beti. (Boulder [Colo.]: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1998)

Biographical.

Consists of handwritten notes, cv, and lecture notes concerning military service and work with the department of agriculture.

Title based on content of series

Series contains pencil sketches, ink designs and watercolour paintings concerning architecture, landscapes, plants and insects, home furnishings, utensils and abstract patterns and decortations. Sketches depict Burgess's concern for the Arts and Crafts design movement during his student years and the practicle, design work of his professional career in Québec and Alberta.

Title based on content of the series.

Contains photos of Professor Burgess, houses and architecture taken in Europe, University buildings, Bowker building, and some civic planning. Contains photo albums of Scottish scenes, houses and churches in Great Britain, and many buildings and lanscapes - especially in Montréal.

Title based on content of series.

Biographical

The records in this series present an overview of the life of Walter Edgar Harris. They contain highlights of his career and important contributions to the scientific community. The materials are arranged by subject with some of the media separated from their respective subjects. This series focuses on his time spent as a student, professor, scholar and committee member. A significant portion of the material includes recognition of his academic achievements in the form of awards, celebratory letters, and opening statements. There are also feature articles with brief summaries of Harris’s academic life, personal biographical writings and two of his yearbooks from university. The documents are primarily textual with a few photographs and a large number of 35mm slides. Other document types include examination questions and notes for various courses Harris had taken as a student, essays, lists of expenses, diplomas, birthday cards, newspaper clippings, biographical notes and correspondence regarding awards. These records were created between 1929 and 2011 with one slide from Harris’ public school from 1919. Harris collected and compiled the materials, complete with a personal history and extensive notes. Harris’s personal accounts include reflections on his early life, graduate school, career, committees and late life interest in the game of bridge. It also includes his personal thoughts on marriage, science, religion, his brother Raymond, uranium, and energy, among other subjects.

Buildings and facilities

Includes building management committees; security; space requests, submissions, estimates, and allocations; Space Alterations Committee (1964-1968); and Campus Planning Committee (1961-1967).

Faculty of Arts

Results 1 to 100 of 973