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Bruce Peel Special Collections Pocock, Roger
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Photograph of old coffin at Magdalena Bay

Photograph of an opened coffin and bones among the rocks of Magdalena Bay in Norway. Writing on reverse reads "The unburied dead of the Arctic". Location identified from Pocock's book A Chorus to Adventurers (1931, p. 243).

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of Magdalena Bay

Photograph of the snowy, mountainous shoreline of Magdalena Bay and the schooner Terningen taken from the shore. The schooner. Location and ship identified from Pocock's book A Chorus to Adventurers (1931, p. 242).

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of schooner v.1

Photograph of an unidentified schooner. Likely the Terningen, the boat used for the Spitzbergen Expedition.

Pocock, Roger

3.6 Journey to Spitzbergen (1921)

Subseries consists of photographs from Pocock's expedition with Oxford University to Spitzbergen, an island in northern Norway. This expedition took place in 1921 and is documented in Pocock's 1921 diaries. Subseries is arranged according to the order that photographs were processed.

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of the steamer Klahowya

Photograph of the sternwheel steamer, Klahowya, at a dock. Writing on reverse reads "Steamer; [legging me not to short?]; head of Colombia R. (River)".

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of man holding trophy bears

Photograph of man holding a trophy bear by the snout with a smaller bear lying at the feet of the first bear. Writing on reverse reads "[Mr?] Silvertip + [Miss] Silvertip".

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of gopher

Photograph of gopher standing on hind legs. Writing on reverse reads "Gopher at front door.".

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of two men outside of log cabin

Photograph of two men standing outside a log cabin in a forest. Cabin, trees, and ground are covered in snow. Writing on reverse reads "Trappers' Shed; 10 June".

Pocock, Roger

Photographs of Randle Cecil

Photograph of Randle Cecil sitting on the step of a stable door. Beside him a child plays with two dogs. Writing on the reverse of one reads "Randle Cecil".

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of K Ranch, UT

Photograph of ranch in Utah. Writing on front reads "K Ranch; Garrison Photo" and test on reverse reads "A Mormon ranch in Utah, 1899."

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of log jam

Photograph of a log jam over a cliff side. Writing on reverse reads "180 000 [lies?], 140,000 logs, 1/2 mile long, 60 ft high".

Pocock, Roger

Photograph of two men in hunting gear

Photograph of two unidentified men dressed in hunting gear. One of them holds a rifle. There is a dog sitting in front of them. Writing on reverse reads "no 10; British Columbians in shooting kit".

Pocock, Roger

Magazine article: "Nine Men who 'Discovered' America" (1931)

Pocock's article, "Nine Men who 'Discovered' America" is published and found in The Cornhill Magazine, no. 417, published in March 1931. His article covers historical accounts of men who 'discovered' America before Columbus. The rest of the magazine consists of short stories, serialized novel chapters, poems, opinion pieces, and advertisements.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock, Roger. Horses. London: John Murray. (1917)

Non-fiction book written by Roger Pocock: Pocock, Roger. Horses. London: John Murray, 1917. Signed by Pocock for Sam Steele and Harwood Steele. Originally owned by Sam Steele, the book was transferred to Harwood Steele in 1935.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock, Roger. Sword and Dragon. London: Hodder and Stoughton. (1909)

Pocock, Roger. Sword and Dragon. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1909. No signatures. Left within the pages it contains an envelope of photographic negatives of unidentified people and a small watercolour painting of "A Glimpse of the North Saskatchewan, 5:30 pm July 5th 1886. Prince Albert". Both the painting and writing are indicative of Pocock's hand.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock, Roger. The Arctic Night. N.p.: n.p. [1896]

Fiction book: Pocock, Roger. The Arctic Night. N.p.: n.p., [1896]. Contains only the text block and no title page. Stamped periodically throughout with "Richard Clay & Sons, Limited; Bungay; 18 AUG 96".

Pocock, Roger

Letter to G.E. Webster (9 April 1903)

Letter from Pocock to [G.E.] Webster of Methuen & Co. dated 9 April 1903. Pocock writes that he is deliberating a new title for the book and addresses the royalty fees he expects.

Pocock, Roger

Letter to Rudyard Kipling (15 June 1903)

Letter from Pocock to Rudyard Kipling dated 15 June 1903. Pocock asks Kipling to confirm the accuracy of a reference to himself, then explains what the book is about, and asks for a written testimony from Kipling regarding Pocock's merits.

Pocock, Roger

Letter to G.E. Webster (June 1903)

Letter from Pocock to G.E. Webster of Methuen & Co. undated, possibly from 5 to 10 of June 1903. Pocock writes about the edits he has made and justifies the passages he wants to keep.

Pocock, Roger

Notes written on Tulameen Hotel letterhead [1888]

Travel notes written on piece of paper with the Tulameen Hotel letterhead, undated. This was a hotel in Princeton, BC. The notes are about travel details going from Princeton to Hope, BC. Denotes distances between various landmarks and where 'feed' can be found. It is unclear if these were notes on a planned journey or from a completed journey.

Pocock, Roger

Sketch of NWMP Camp (1886)

A watercolour sketch by Pocock of a NWMP encampment in 1886. Writing on front reads "NWMP F. Troop Detachment Camp - Moon of Berries 1886".

Pocock, Roger

Letter to Harwood Steele (1 July 1930)

Letter from Pocock to Harwood Steele dated 1 July 1930 regarding the rejection to publish several of Harwood's writings. Pocock also writes about a veteran's dinner he attended.

Pocock, Roger

Letter to Harwood Steele (28 May 1930)

Letter from Pocock to Harwood Steele dated 28 May 1930 regarding the rejection to reprint or publish several writings of Harwood's and Pocock's attempt to meet with other editors.

Pocock, Roger

Note to "Gentlemen" [1914?]

A brief note in Pocock's handwriting addressed to "Gentlemen" which states "With reference to Mr. Stanley Hawley's music, set to poems for Miss Ashwell's recitation." There is no date and the address "10 Bedford Row" is written at the top. On the reverse is written "JB Thompson, Hotel Britannique, 20 Avenue Victoria, Paris".

Pocock, Roger

Letter to Daisy (25 May 1887)

Letter from Pocock to Daisy (his sister) dated 25 May 1887. He writes about arrangements for their mother's funeral.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock Scrapbook (1890 - 1891)

Pocock's [1890-1891] scrapbook consists of approximately 163 sheets of newspaper clippings, handwritten entries, sketches, and photographs.
Scrapbook contains:
Sketches of a dugout canoe, Coeur d'Alene camp, Astoria, Kootenay area, Columbia River, Mt. Ranier, B.C. interior (Douglas Lake trail), Nelson Lake, and colour paintings of the [Kootenay Mines?].
Imprint cuttings of Nanaimo, Fort Victoria, the Columbia River, Kootenay area, Fort Astoria, wildlife, the "Duchess" on the Columbia River, Shuswap area, cartoons, Nelson and area, No. 2 Kodak camera, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho area, Oregon, Columbia River, Montana area, San Francisco, Grand River, and Colorado area.
Clippings of published articles and stories written by Pocock including "Jack's Hearth", "The Muir Glacier", "Historical Notes", "The Streamer Beaver", "Discovery of Gold in B.C.", "A Kootenay Scheme", "In a Mining Camp (Oregon)" that includes sketches, various letters to the editor, and poems "The Gold Miner" and "The Lumberman". Other clippings includes articles from the Victoria newspaper, the need for advertising B.C., and articles about the Kootenay area, particularly the mines.
Postcards (loose) of the Grand Trunk Pacific track along the Skeena River, scenes at Hazelton, B.C., and mail teams (dog sled) at Skeena River during construction of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
Letters from Pocock to his father, and his sisters, Rose and Daisy, and a letter to Pocock from J.A. MacPherson of Boston, MA.
Diary entries including accounts of his travels in Kootenay, Idaho, and Oregon.
Published maps of Nelson, B.C., "Map to Accompany Report of Supt. S.B. Steele Commanding the Detachment of Mounted Police in British Columbia", and Idaho
Hand-drawn map of Wallace, ID.
Notice of mining claim stake (July 1890).
Pamphlet about Columbia.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock Scrapbook (1890)

Pocock's 1890 scrapbook consists mostly of large photographs and imprint cuttings of British Columbia and the Rocky Mountains.
Scrapbook contains:
Imprint cuttings of scenes of B.C. and the Rocky Mountains.
Photographs of Kicking Horse Pass, Rodger's Pass, mountain scenes, Indigenous people, scenes of Bella Coola, Victoria, portraits (most unidentified), Lizzie Denny, two women convocating in caps and gowns, people and scenes of Port Essington, scenes of Skeena River, Fraser River First Nations, and scenes of Fraser River.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock Scrapbook (1888)

Pocock's 1888 scrapbook consists of textual and graphic material related his travels in British Columbia and Alaska.

Scrapbook contains:
Photographs of small portraits of unnamed people, wildlife, and scenes of British Columbia and Alaska.
Clippings of reviews of his book, "Tales of Western Life", articles about Alaska, articles about Pocock's travels and visits with Indigenous people, published critiques on his writing, a published editorial on Pocock's condemnation of how Indigenous people are being treated by the government, jokes and humourous stories, and current events.
Sketches and paintings of scenes in British Columbia and Alaska, totems, and Indigenous people.
Receipts.
Diary entries for the year 1888.
Letters to his father, his sister, Ethel, and from various people (such as lawyers and character references for Pocock).
Maps of British Columbia.
Typewritten manuscript copies of Pocock's stories "A Modern Pirate: The Story of an Adventure in Behring Sea" (35 pages) and "Seventh Watch: The Yokohama Pirates" (28 pages).

Pocock, Roger

Pocock Scrapbook (1887 - 1888)

Pocock's 1887-1888 scrapbook consists of approximately 71 sheets of handwritten entries, cuttings of articles and imprints either pasted or tipped in, and letters kept loosely between pages.

Scrapbook contains:
Diary entries for the years 1887-1888
Handwritten financial records.
Notifications of his publication "Tales of Western Life".
Sketches of buildings and paintings of "Day After the Fire - June 14th,1886" (artist not credited).
Letters to his father (handwritten and typewritten), Frank, and his sister, Daisy.
Manuscript copy of "The Tale of a Tenderfoot".
Imprint cuttings of ranching, scenery, landscapes and towns of British Columbia, RCMP, trains and train stations, Calgary, wildlife, and Indigenous people.
Article clippings of jokes, religious editorials, and articles about his injury of breaking his arm.
Maps of British Columbia.

Pocock, Roger

Pocock Scrapbook (1887)

Pocock's 1887 scrapbook consists of approximately 53 leaves of textual and graphic material. Most pages of pasted or tipped in clippings and imprints and handwritten diary entries and letters for the year 1887.

Scrapbook contains:
Sketches of Fort William.
Letters to and from his father, to Mr. Keeper, to his mother, to his sisters, Rose and Daisy, and others. Notable are the telegram telling Pocock of his mother's fatal injury from being thrown from a carriage and the critique of "Spirit of the Plains".
Photographs of his mother on her deathbed and various landscapes.
Imprint cuttings related to Indigenous life, Toronto scenes, Ottawa scenes, Canadian sports, wildlife, and landscapes.
Newsclippings of book reviews, news articles, history of the NWMP, article about his mother's death, jokes, poems (of some Pocock is the author), and current events.
Diary entries for 1887.
Hand-drawn map of Quebec area near Ottawa.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (30 March 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 30 March 1886. Pocock's manuscript about the [Riel] Rebellion was rejected by the Brockville Times. He also speaks of a petition he started to have the bodies of deceased members of his Troop relocated from Carlton to be buried 'here', presumably Prince Albert. Pocock writes that he has started selling cigars and notes how much he is selling them for. He also describes the tension between his old comrades and the new recruits.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (28 February 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 28 February 1886. He writes about attending a kit inspection and how it gave him the opportunity to claim a buffalo hide coat as his personal property; the coat was a gift from a friend by the name of Gilchrist who had since passed away. He also writes about rumours of the NWMP being turned into a militia corps, which in Pocock's opinion is damaging to the positive reputation that the NWMP has developed. He also talks about his income and debts and asks his mother to inquire about cigar prices; he plans to sell cigars to his troop at a discounted rate than is currently offered. Pocock also describes how he was charged and tried for a misunderstanding regarding his duties conflicting with his sick leave. The last part of the letter is missing.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to parents (1886)

A letter from Pocock to parents. The first part of letter missing as there is no greeting or date and the text starts with an incomplete sentence. Pocock writes about a forthcoming dance, how he has helped to prepare for it, and who has been invited to attend. He also talks about the fees associated with retrieving a gift from the post office in Prince Albert.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: statement of cash forwarded

Statement of cash forwarded from Pocock to his [father?]. Pocock specifies the amounts he made each month, amounts paid for tithes and expenditures, and how much is for his father and mother to keep. He then gives advice as to how his father should handle the money.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (September 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother sent from Battleford, Saskatchewan, dated September 1886. Pocock describes the area around Battleford and includes a map of the confluence of the North Saskatchewan River and Battle River and the locations of Battleford, the fort, the old town, the government building, and two troop camps. He also includes a sketch of the typical buildings in Battleford and a describes the town, the typical events, and people that live there.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (4-6 September 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother sent from Battleford, Saskatchewan, dated 4 September 1886. Pocock and his troop have moved and set up camp outside the fort that is South West of the Battleford plain. He describes the a building of the fort and supplies a sketch of it. He writes of walking along the rivers and meeting a recruit from another troop. He also describes the weather, which is cold and snowy. He describes the scenery outside his tent and provides a sketch of the fort.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother ([28-31 May?] 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother. This multi-part letter describes his surroundings and the events as he and his troop move west along the prairies, starting at Sugar Creek [a tributary of Lake Winnipeg] on a Friday, moving to Eagle Creek, Saskatchewan, on Saturday, then to Battleford, Saskatchewan, on Sunday. There is then a final entry dated the 31st written from outside Battleford. If the dates given are sequential, then the letter dates from the 28-31 May 1886. Includes three sketches and a sketched map of the area around the confluence of the North Saskatchewan River and Battle River.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (11 October 1886)

Letter from R.P. to his mother sent from Prince Alberta, Saskatchewan, dated 11 October 1886. Pocock reports on an epidemic of typhoid in Battleford, Saskatchewan, and lists those who have died from it. He then writes about an incident in which he wrote to his friend, Harry Keenan, about how some of the NWMP officers were drinking hospital-issued alcohol, and how one of those officers read his postcard. Pocock suspected that he would be reprimanded by the commissioner, but that did not happen. Pocock has been promised by Captain Perry to be sent to Regina as soon as possible. Pocock requests that one of his stories be sent to Harper's and then complains about the poor quality of poems that get published. One of his stories was published in The Week and he criticizes it. Pocock responds to the news that Lady MacDonald, John A. MacDonald's wife, is staying with his sister Rose. He hopes to use the connection to secure himself a pension.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (7 November 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother sent from Regina, Saskatchewan, dated 7 November 1886. Pocock asks his mother to gather up and send several of his stories and poetry to "The Witness" in Montreal. Pocock celebrated his 21st birthday on 9 November 1886 and writes about his birthday. Pocock is about to travel home to Ontario and responds to his father's ideas for accommodation and work. He writes of the various routes he may take to Ontario. He shares news of five men who robbed and deserted the previous week.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (June 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated June 1886. Pocock is sending his mother his diaries. He first describes some of the highlights for each diary covering the years 1883-1886. Pocock the describes an incident of that week where he helped the drunk quarter master back into his building, which he was locked out of. Captain Perry has departed and the troop has been celebrating and drinking the whole week. Pocock writes about the changes within the camp because of Perry's departure. He also describes several other happenings around camp.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: first-hand description of a desertion

A description of three men deserting from Pocock's troop. Covers the conversations that Pocock had with the deserters and with those investigating it the next day. The desertion happened on the '9th inst' (meaning the 9th of this month), though exact month is unclear. Incident likely happened in early spring according to another letter.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (June 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated June 1886. Pocock writes of his improved confidence in writing and of the stories and essays he is planning to write. Pocock then writes about how the sunset and sunrise differ between the seasons and describes the summer night sky 'light show' he recently witnessed and provides a sketch of the scenery. Pocock had gone on a long drive with a friend and describes their journey and sketches the wagon they rode on. He ends the letter by discrediting recent reports published in The Globe of the North West.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to father (19 May 1886)

Letter from Pocock to father sent from Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, dated 19 May 1886. Pocock writes of how he is not suited for deep study or thoughts; he would rather be a 'gentleman and a soldier'. He then writes about a nightmare he had while he was unconsciousness from chloroform during the removal of his gangrenous toes. This nightmare caused anxiety and new avenues of studies for Pocock. He then shares his thoughts on the subjects of pain and God. He then brings up that the NWMP is being reorganized and he may be asked to leave the force because of his injury. The last part of the letter is missing.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (28 June 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 28 June 1886. Pocock describes a priest he was acquainted with back in Hamilton, Ontario. He then describes the scenery around him during the sunset. Pocock has written a murder mystery story and describes the setting and characters.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (17 August 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 17 August 1886. Pocock anticipates that he will go with a party of about 30 men to Battleford on 25 August 1886. Pocock describes four men from Montana who were falsely arrested and have been staying in their camp. He ends the letter with a description and sketches of 'Mexican type' spurs.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother ([Spring 1886])

Letter from Pocock to his mother. The letter is undated but according to Pocock's description of the weather it was written in the spring and before May. Pocock has written several stories about Lake Superior that he plans to publish and asks his family to read and review them. Four deserters were captured and sentenced to 12-months imprisonment each. Pocock also describes a sermon on creation, the weather, and local costume.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (12 May 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 12 May 1886. Pocock writes about his cigar selling business and its success. He plans on selling iced beverages in the recreation room to make more money. He then writes about the happenings of the week, commenting on the snowy and cold weather. He then describes his room and its contents.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother ([19 May] 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated [May?] 1886. Pocock writes about having ennui and how he is unhappy with the men in his troop, calling them 'piebiters'. He then describes in great detail his friend, Monty. He writes that he is also sending a picture of his camp from the perspective of his room. It seems he also sends a group photo of his troop and identifies and describes some of the men in the photo. He also sends several sketches of men in typical costumes and a 'roll of dogs'.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to parents ('Wednesday afternoon' 1886)

Letter from P to parents dated as 'Wednesday afternoon' 1886; the exact date of the letter is unknown. Pocock writes that most of his troop has gone, leaving only himself and about 20 other men; he lists the duties he has been assigned while the troop is away. In response to his father, Pocock will try to put together sketches that illustrate some of his stories submitted to Harper's. In the future, Pocock plans on writing a series of stories about every region that he has visited and will visit. He is currently reading 'Vestiges of Creation' and describes the subject matter of it.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (30 August 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 30 August 1886. Pocock details a conversation he had with Captain Perry, the leader of his troop. They had a discussion about Pocock's injury, where Pocock wanted to go to Regina to receive treatment but Perry warns against this because Pocock would miss the commission on all cases of injuries received during the Rebellion. Perry also informed him that through this commission Pocock is likely to receive a life-long pension. After this conversation, Pocock learns from others that the pension will likely be larger than Perry had said.
Pocock writes that the F Troop in Regina was inspected by John A. McDonald and thus received the nickname "Sir John's Pets." He also writes how many who were under fire during the rebellion were receiving medals and land grants, of which Pocock had received neither.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (10 August 1886)

Letter from Pocock to mother dated 10 August 1886. Pocock writes about wanting to improve the metre of his poetry and asks his mother to look for and send him a treatise on metre. He tells his mother of his apprehension to attend Trinity College, arguing that he is not smart enough for such a level of education. He closes the letter by describing how he bested a Methodist in an argument.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (6 August 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 6 August 1886. Pocock writes of his anticipated sick leave. He will receive treatment in Regina, but does not want to stay there for the recovery; he will put in a request to have his sick leave in either Toronto or Banff. He then anticipates being discharged and having to find a place to settle that has mild winter temperatures because of his frostbitten foot. He writes about setting up a cigar shop in Vancouver and selling the land once real estate prices go up.
He mentions an incident involving his friend Monty over a revolver; he then describes the revolver in detail supplied with a sketch of it. Pocock writes about his new found confidence and his preferences in fashion and personal grooming.
He mentions that there was a hailstorm the previous night from which there was "immense damage"; he sketched the size of the hail stones. Pocock purchased four [paintings?] of Lake Superior by Fred Bingham. He is writing essays on religious topics and is not ready to submit them.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to family ([1886])

Letter from Pocock to his family. First part of letter may be missing as there is no greeting or date. Pocock writes about his gratitude for the criticisms of his essays and of a painting of a sunset he is to send along with the letter. It seems that one of his sisters had a celebration for either marriage of coming of age and Pocock laments having missed it. The last part is directly addressed to his father and Pocock expresses frustration at how the North West is portrayed so favourable by the press; he wants to write truthfully about it so that new settlers are not deceived upon arrival.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (20 July 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 20 July 1886. Pocock describes a recent highway robbery, his debts, and the weather. He also describes an incident of dealing with an intoxicated man who was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct the night before. The man had drunk a concoction of copper sulphate and tartaric acid, which was called 'cider'. The man selling the 'cider' was fined $50; Pocock then writes about how the 'cider' has become a problem in Prince Albert.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother and father (20 April 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother and father dated 20 April 1886. Pocock writes about how the recovery of his foot has regressed and how the camp doctor had moved on to Fort McLeod. He also describes the spring weather conditions including the ice break-up and prairie fires. Pocock's cigar selling is going well and he records his sales and profits. He has moved into the barracks and is very happy about the move. Pocock is then reading "Life of Christ" by Frederic Farrar. The most popular sport for the troop is curling. He ends the letter by worrying about upcoming payments for a dance and mess expenses and how he had to pay to replace stolen items.

Pocock, Roger

Loose item from 1886 scrapbook: letter to mother (14 March 1886)

Letter from Pocock to his mother dated 14 March 1886. Pocock describes his displeasure with 'morning Church parades' as they are compulsory and force the troop to work on a Sunday morning; he participated in a silent protest with the rest of the troop during the sermon. He then describes the seriousness of his recent frost bite and his recovery from that injury. Uncertain whether the last part of this letter is missing.

Pocock, Roger

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