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People and Organization

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The Provost was responsible for general supervision over the conduct and welfare of the students, in cooperation with the Deans of Women and Men. Among the office's duties were: Secretary, Committee on Student Affairs (1914-1963); Chair, Committee on Student Affairs (1963-1966); Secretary, Deans' Council ([1923- 1977]; Chair, Council on Student Affairs (1967-[1977]); and Chair, General Residence Committee ([1955-1977]). The Provost was replaced in 1977 by the Dean of Student Services. Provosts: 1914-1945 John Malcolm MacEachran; 1945-1947 Percival Sidney Warren; 1947-1953 Harry Theodore Sparby; 1953-1977 Aylmer A. Ryan

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The Non-Academic Staff Association (NASA) is the certified bargaining agent for general support staff at the University of Alberta. Formerly Branch 22 of the Civil Service Association of Alberta, it broke from its parent organization in 1969 and was certified as a bargaining agent by the Public Service Employee Relations Board in September 1978.

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The teaching of anthropology was introduced in the late 1950s within the Department of Philosophy and Psychology. In 1963 the joint Department of Sociology and Anthropology was established, and by 1966 two separate departments were formed. The Department's personnel, facilities, teaching function, and research emphasis are organized around four programs: 1. archaeology and paleoenvironmental studies; 2. physical anthropology and primatology; 3. culture contact, development and world problems; 4. symbolic, linguistic and cognitive analysis (PACCR, 1986). Chairs: 1966-1970 Charles S. Brant; 1967-1968 Harold Barclay (Acting); 1971-1975 Henry T. Lewis; 1975-1978 C. Roderick Wilson; 1978-1981 Clifford G. Hickey; 1981-1982 Michael Asch (Acting); 1982-1986 Michael Asch; 1986-[1990] Henry T. Lewis; 1990- David Lubell .

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The University established the first Department of Fine Arts in the province in 1945. Visual arts, music and drama were included under the headship of Henry George Glyde. In 1962 the BFA program in art was introduced; 1965 saw the establishment of the Department of Art and Design; and by 1970/71 an MFA Program was instituted. The Department's present structure was developed between 1967 and 1974. Courses are offered in the three major areas of Art, Design, and History of Art and Design (PACCR, 1982). Heads: 1945-1966 Henry George Glyde; 1966-1967 John Benjamin Taylor (Acting); 1967-1976 Ronald Davey. Chairs: 1976-1982 Douglas Haynes; 1982-1987 Jorge Frascara; 1987-1990 Richard Chenier; 1990-1991 Ronald Davey (Acting); 1990- Desmond A. Rochfort.

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The Department of Classics was formally established in 1926, but the study of Classics at the University actually began in 1908 with Dr. Toryþs appointment of William Alexander Hardy as Professor of Classics. Courses in Greek and Roman history, art, archaeology, technology, myth, and religion are offered by the Department. Of particular note is the summer program in practical archaeology held at various sites in Italy. Heads: 1908-1937 William Hardy Alexander; 1937-1964 William George Hardy; 1964-1969 Robert J. Buck. Chairs: 1969-1972 Robert J. Buck; 1972-1975 Margery W. Mackenzie; 1975-1983 Richard Smith; 1983-1988 John R. Wilson; 1988- Duncan Fishwick.

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Studio Theatre was established in 1949 as a place for Drama Division students to practice their craft and hone their skills. Staff of the Drama Division of the Department of Fine Arts operated the Theatre, and early participants included Robert Orchard, Gordon Peacock, Bert Pullinger, Frank Glenfield, Elizabeth Sterling Haynes, Don Pimm, and Tom Peacocke. The Theatre site was located in two deserted Second World War Quonset huts. The Quonset huts, placed side by side, contained between them a stage, auditorium, workshop, drama offices, and foyer. The first play produced on the Quonset stage was Henry IV, and for the next eight seasons over forty full-act plays, numerous one-act plays, two world premieres, and six Canadian premieres were produced on the Quonset Studio Theatre stage. The Quonset huts were torn down in 1958, and Studio Theatre was offered auditorium and classroom space in the Education Building (E.A. Corbett Hall). Studio Theatre occupied this space through to June 1989, winding up its 40th season anniversary with Michael Frayn's Benefactor just prior to the closing of Corbett Hall for renovations on June 17, 1989. Studio Theatre then operated from the Myer Horowitz stage and, in 1995, moved to its new home in the newly opened Timms Centre. Studio Theatre celebrated its 50th anniversary of operation in the spring of 1999, and continues in the present to provide Edmonton audiences with a varied and unique theatre experience.

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The Department of History and Political Economy was established in 1915/16, offering one course in economics and a moderate variety in history. In 1920/21 the Department split and the new Department of Political Economy emerged, offering fourteen courses. Political Economy split into the Departments of Economics and Political Science in 1964. The Department has three main academic tasks: to cultivate economics as a branch of civilized knowledge; to provide economics courses as part of the training in various professional programs; and to train economists as professionals in their own right through its graduate and honours programs. (PACCR, 1981). Professors: 1920-1929 Duncan A. MacGibbon; 1929-1946 George Alexander Elliott; 1946-1950 Andrew Stewart; 1950-1957 Henry B. Mayo. Heads: 1957-1964 Eric J. Hanson; 1964-1969 Walter D. Gainer. Chairs: 1969-1972 Thomas L. Powrie; 1972-1977 Bruce W. Wilkinson; 1977- 1987 Brian L. Scarfe; 1987- Melville L. McMillan.

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In 1964, the Department of Modern Languages was split into three separate departments, one of which was the Department of Germanic Languages and General Linguistics. A Division of Linguistics was formed in 1968, and a year later it became a department within the Faculty of Science. In 1987 it was placed under the Faculty of Arts. As a teaching and research department, it is concerned with the experimental testing of formal linguistic models and the propositions of general linguistics theory, and with the theoretical problems introduced by such experimental studies. Heads: 1964-1969 Ernest Reinhold. Chairs: 1969-1976 Christopher I.J. Stuart; 1976-1977 Gary Prideaux; 1977-1987 Gary Prideaux; 1987-1990 Lois Stanford; 1990- John T. Hogan.

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The Department of Fine Arts, established in 1945, included music, drama and visual arts under the leadership of Henry George Glyde. The Bachelor of Music degree was instituted in 1958, and the Master of Music degree in 1968. Fine Arts split into its present three departments in 1965. Over the years, the Department's staff and students have enriched the cultural climate in Edmonton and its environs through bands, choirs, orchestras, opera productions, radio and television concerts and lectures, and production of new music, to name some examples. The Department cooperates with the Western Board of Music to provide a comprehensive study syllabus and examination program used widely by music teachers throughout Alberta and Western Canada (PACCR, 1983). Heads: 1947-1965 Richard S. Eaton. Chairs: 1965-1968 Richard S. Eaton; 1969-1986 Robert Stangeland; 1986-[1990] Alfred Fisher; [1990]- Wesley Berg.

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Political Science courses were first offered by the Department of Political Economy in 1923. Dr. Henry Bertram Mayo, the University's first political scientist, was appointed in 1947, and was Acting Head from 1951 to 1957. In 1964, Political Economy split into the Departments of Economics and Political Science. The Department's primary role is to educate students about the nature and activity of the state and the conduct of its government and politics, the government and politics of other societies and the interaction of such governments, and about individual rights and obligations (PACCR, 1984). Heads: 1964-1965 Grant R. Davy; 1966-1969 Christian Bay. Chairs: 1969-1972 Grant R. Davy; 1972-1974 J. Peter Meekison; 1975-1982 Roberta E. McKown; 1982-1985 Frederick C. Engelmann; 1985- Allan Tupper.

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The University of Alberta is a major Canadian centre for teaching and research in sociology and related specialties such as criminology and demography. The first official course in sociology was taught in the early 1950s, but it wasnþt until 1956 that the first full-time sociology position was approved within the Department of Philosophy and Psychology. The Department was renamed the Department of Philosophy and Sociology when the Department of Psychology split off in 1960. In the years that followed, the Department underwent several name and administrative changes. It was known as the Department of Sociology (1961-1963), the Department of Sociology and Anthropology (1963-1966), and again as the Department of Sociology since 1966. Heads: 1960-1961 Anthony Manuel Mardiros; 1961-1963 Robert James; 1963-1969 Gordon Hirabayashi. Chairs: 1969-1970 Gordon Hirabayashi; 1970-1971 John Forster; 1971-1972 Baha Abu-Laban; 1972-1975 Charles Hobart; 1975-1980 Terrence H. White; 1980-1985 Robert Silverman; 1985-1988 Gordon Fearn; 1988- Robert Silverman.

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Instruction in dairy production was administered by a department known successively as Dairying (1921-1959) and Dairy Science (1959-1961). To reflect a widening of scope it was renamed the Department of Dairy and Food Science (1961) before taking its current designation in 1964. The sole source of food science education in Alberta, the Department offers teaching, research, extension and professional activities related to food production, processing, and microbiology (PACCR, 1984). Heads: 1921-1934 Christian P. Marker; 1934-1958 Harold R. Thornton; 1958-1969 Lawrence F.L. Clegg. Chairs: 1969-1974 Lawrence F.L. Clegg; 1974-1982 Harold Jackson; 1982- Frederick Henry Wolfe.

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With roots in coursework offered in the University's former Department of Political Economy, the subject of rural economy was established in its own department under successive name changes: Agricultural Economics and Farm Management (1961), Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology (1969), and by its current designation (1975). The object of the Department of Rural Economy is to study and teach about the relationship between the agriculture and forestry industries and the general economy and the effect of this relationship on the environment and rural people; that is, the economics of farming. It concerns itself with on-campus teaching, research, extension and community service (PACCR, 1981). Professor: [1960-1961?] A. Gordon Ball. Heads: 1962-1969 Travis W. Manning. Chairs: 1969- 1974 Travis W. Manning; 1974-1978 Thomas Alfred Petersen; 1978-1987 Milburn L. Lerohl; 1987 William E. Phillips.

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Known as the Faculty of Agriculture until 1972, its name change recognized the introduction of the forestry program in 1970. The Faculty provides teaching facilities for obtaining primary and a advanced science degrees in agriculture, forestry and food science. It also administers a two-year pre-Veterinary Medicine program. The Faculty holds sites on and off the campus for conducting practical research to solve problems in the agriculture and forestry fields. Deans: 1915-1940 Ernest Albert Howes; 1940-1941 Robert Newton; 1941-1951 Robert David Sinclair; 1951-1959 Arthur Gilbert McCalla; 1959-1968 C. Fred Bentley; 1968-1975 Fenton Vincent MacHardy; 1975-1983 John Bowland; 1983-1988 Roy Torgny Berg; 1988- Edward W. Tyrchniewicz.

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The Department focuses its teaching and research on three areas: counselling and school psychology, special education (e.g. handicapped and gifted students), and basic educational psychology. Although it contributes to teacher training on the undergraduate level, it has increasingly directed its resources towards its graduate program. Among the sevices it has provided are the Education Clinic, Education Research Services, Test Library, and the Developmental Disabilities Centre. Heads: 1950-1966 George Murray Dunlop; 1966-1969 Bernard R. Corman. Chairs: 1969-1972 Bernard R. Corman; 1972-1978 Wilfred H.O. Schmidt; 1974-1975 Juanita Chambers (Acting); 1978-1988 Harvey Zingle; 1988- Eugene William Romaniuk.

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This department's range of responsibilities includes the instruction of elementary school teachers, graduate program supervision, research, and publications. It also serves the University and educational community at large, participating on committees, providing workshops and presentations at conferences, and acting as a consultant for various educational organizations (PACCR, 1985). Heads: 1950-1961 William Dewar McDougall; 1961-1966 Walter Holms Worth; 1967 Neil M. Purvis (Acting); 1967-1968 Arthur Kratzmann; 1968-1969 Leonard Doyal Nelson (Acting). Chairs: 1969-1972 Myer Horowitz; 1972-1977 David Allister McKay; 1977-[1985] Patricia A. McFetridge; 1985-1990 Warren D. Wilde.Multiple media, 1950-1985,

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In addition to teaching the application of scientific principles to the solution of agriculture and forestry problems, and through research, the acquiring of new knowledge ... the Department covers the major fields of entomology [and is] especially mindful of the importance of a strong program of graduate study (PACCR, 1987). Among the aspects of insect biology studied are morphology, development, physiology, genetics, biochemistry, insect/plant relationships and population biology. Heads: 1922-1954 Edgar Harold Strickland; 1954-1969 Brian Hocking. Chairs: 1969-1974 Brian Hocking; 1974-1984 George Eugene Ball; 1984-1989 Beverley K. Mitchell; 1989- Ronald H. Gooding.

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The office coordinates and administers academic personnel matters; applies and interprets regulations on benefits; assists in salary negotiations and in standing committees involving promotions and tenure of academic staff and in selection and review committees of senior officers (Deans and Directors). Associate Vice-Presidents: 1978- Brian Hugh McDonald.

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The Office of the Dean of Men and Foreign Student Advisor, established in 1960, had the responsibility to advise and assist male students, to supervise fraternities and to assist with student discipline. The Office acted as coordinator for Canadian University Services Overseas (CUSO) and the Canadian International Development Agency. The functions of the office were assumed by the Office of the Dean of Student in 1976. Dean of Men: 1960-1975 Roland Charles Wilkins Hooper.

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The Non-Academic Staff Association (NASA) is the certified bargaining agent for general support staff at the University of Alberta. Formerly Branch 22 of the Civil Service Association of Alberta, it broke from its parent organization in 1969 and was certified as a bargaining agent by the Public Service Employee Relations Board in September 1978.

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The University of Alberta Mixed Chorus is among the oldest non-sport organizations on campus, tracing its beginning to 1939 when a small choir was formed under the direction of Ottoman Cypress to supply music for Student Christian Movement services. In 1943, the Varsity Choir applied for membership to the Literary Association of the Students Union, allowing the choir to apply for Student Union funding to purchase music for the expanding choir. Rehearsals and practices for the choir were organized for the fall of 1944, under the leadership of Gordon F. Clark, a first-year medical student. Their first concert was presented in Convocation Hall on campus in February 1945. Their repertoire of short classical pieces and traditional folk songs prompted a name change and in 1945, the organization became officially known as the University of Alberta Mixed Chorus. The records have been arranged and described in two broad series and several sub-headings, with a basic chronological order maintained within each series. The textual files provide information about the early years of the Chorus' existence, particularly the years from 1946 to about 1971. Files maintained by the executive and directors (Richard Eaton and James Whittle) are significant for the information they provide about the Chorus' yearly operations and activities. Information in the files after the Whittle years is sketchier, and more incidental in nature. The textual files include correspondence, clippings, some meeting minutes, membership lists, the organization's constitution, and evidence of the planning and fundraising required to orchestrate the annual UAMC Spring Tour. Under Professor Eaton's leadership, which was to last for twenty years, the Chorus increased in size and accomplishment. The Mixed Chorus spring tour started in1947 to meet requests for the Chorus to appear in several Alberta cities and towns. The first tour, held between examination week and convocation in May, saw a group of about 80 members' travel through southern Alberta for nine days, giving a concert each night, and ending with a culminating performance in Convocation Hall in Edmonton. The Chorus dressed in formal attire for the tours; women in pastel evening gowns and men in dark suits and black bow ties. The spring tour (or May Tour) became an important annual event for the Mixed Chorus. Over the intervening years, tours expanded to include visits to communities in Saskatchewan, British Columbia, the Northwest Territories, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Richard Eaton's sudden death while on sabbatical in 1968 was devastating to the Chorus members. James Whittle, a member of the Chorus and Assistant Conductor since 1964, took over as director of the after Professor Eaton's death. He conducted the Chorus in 1968, 1969 and 1971; Dr. David Stocker, a professor in the Department of Music, led the Chorus during 1970. In 1971, Dr. R.E. Stephens, Professor of Music Education at the University of Alberta, assumed the position of Conductor of UAMC, a post he held until 1986. His fifteen years with the Chorus were interrupted briefly by his sabbatical leave in 1979, when Merrill Flewelling conducted the Chorus. Robert de Frece, who sang in the Chorus from 1967 to 1971, took over as director of the UAMC from Ron Stephens in 1986 and is the present director. In 1988, the Faculty of Education Handbell Ringers was established as a separate sub-group available to current members of the Mixed Chorus; the Handbell Ringers perform annually with the UAMC. The Mixed Chorus Alumni Association was established in 1991 to promote continuing contact among Mixed Chorus alumni and to support and promote the activities of the UAMC. An annual alumni dinner is held prior to the Mixed Chorus Spring Concert.

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Edmonton's premier oratorio choir, founded in 1951, was originally called the University Singers. It was renamed in memory of its founding director, Richard S. Eaton, in 1969. It has had a long association with the University of Alberta, as the Choir rehearses on campus and draws its music directors from the Department of Music. The Singers, however, have always been an entity separate from the University, drawing members from the general community and receiving funding from other sources. Directors: 1951-1967 Richard S. Eaton; 1968-1973 Alexandra Munn; 1973-[1982] Larry D. Cook; [1982]- Leonard Ratzlaff.

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The University established the first Department of Fine Arts in the province in 1945. Visual arts, music and drama were included under the headship of Henry George Glyde. In 1962 the BFA program in art was introduced; 1965 saw the establishment of the Department of Art and Design; and by 1970/71 an MFA Program was instituted. The Department's present structure was developed between 1967 and 1974. Courses are offered in the three major areas of Art, Design, and History of Art and Design (PACCR, 1982). Heads: 1945-1966 Henry George Glyde; 1966-1967 John Benjamin Taylor (Acting); 1967-1976 Ronald Davey. Chairs: 1976-1982 Douglas Haynes; 1982-1987 Jorge Frascara; 1987-1990 Richard Chenier; 1990-1991 Ronald Davey (Acting); 1990- Desmond A. Rochfort.

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The Department of Classics was formally established in 1926, but the study of Classics at the University actually began in 1908 with Dr. Toryþs appointment of William Alexander Hardy as Professor of Classics. Courses in Greek and Roman history, art, archaeology, technology, myth, and religion are offered by the Department. Of particular note is the summer program in practical archaeology held at various sites in Italy. Heads: 1908-1937 William Hardy Alexander; 1937-1964 William George Hardy; 1964-1969 Robert J. Buck. Chairs: 1969-1972 Robert J. Buck; 1972-1975 Margery W. Mackenzie; 1975-1983 Richard Smith; 1983-1988 John R. Wilson; 1988- Duncan Fishwick.

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In 1964, the Department of Modern Languages was split into three separate departments, one of which was the Department of Germanic Languages and General Linguistics. A Division of Linguistics was formed in 1968, and a year later it became a department within the Faculty of Science. In 1987 it was placed under the Faculty of Arts. As a teaching and research department, it is concerned with the experimental testing of formal linguistic models and the propositions of general linguistics theory, and with the theoretical problems introduced by such experimental studies. Heads: 1964-1969 Ernest Reinhold. Chairs: 1969-1976 Christopher I.J. Stuart; 1976-1977 Gary Prideaux; 1977-1987 Gary Prideaux; 1987-1990 Lois Stanford; 1990- John T. Hogan.

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The Department of Modern Languages was established in 1908 as one of the original members of the Faculty of Arts and Science. At first, only two courses in French and two in German were offered by the Department's sole member and head, W.A.R. Kerr (who later served simultaneously as Head of the Department and Dean of the Faculty). In the 1960s, rapid growth was accompanied by far-reaching changes in the Department's administration and structure. The Department had split itself unofficially into Romance, Germanic, and Slavic Divisions, each with its own 'Division Head.' The formal creation of three separate Departments occurred in 1964 (PACCR, 1981). Heads: 1908-1909 Luther Herbert Alexander; 1909-1936 William Alexander Robb Kerr; 1936- 1947 Edouard Sonet; 1947-1952 Francis Owen; 1952-1953 Dennis McNeice Healey; 1953-1964 Edward Joseph Hollingsworth Greene.

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A course in comparative religion was offered from 1964 to 1967 within the Department of Philosophy. Based on the recommendations of a Committee on Religious Studies, the Department of Religious Studies was established in 1967. Courses offered by the Department are designed to acquaint the student with historical and phenomenological approaches to religion. The Department conceived, wrote, and coordinated the series 'Religious Diversity': motion pictures and videotapes produced by the Department of Radio and Television, 1978-1980. Heads: 1967-1969 Charles Davis. Chairs: 1969-1970 Charles Davis; 1970-1974 P. Joseph Cahill; 1974-1980 Earle H. Waugh; 1980-1984 Kchetrepal D. Prithipaul; 1984-1988 P. Joseph Cahill; 1988-1990 Tom M.S. Priestly; 1990- Peter Schouls.

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Slavic and East European Studies (SEES) was formed in 1982 by the amalgamation of the Department of Slavic Languages and the Division of East European Studies. The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures had been created in 1964 from the division of Department of Modern Languages. Its name was changed to Slavic Languages in [1969]. The Departmentþs objective is to maintain the viability of programs leading (from the BA through the MA) to the PhD in Russian Literature, Ukrainian Literature, Ukrainian Folklore, and Slavic Linguistics, and to the MA in East European and Soviet Studies (PACCR, 1987). Heads: 1964-[1968] Orest Starchuk. Chairs: 1968-[1969?] Orest Starchuk; 1969-1974 Gunter Schaarschmidt; 1974-1981 Tom M.S. Priestly; 1981-1989 Robert L. Busch; 1989- Tom M.S. Priestly.

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The University of Alberta is a major Canadian centre for teaching and research in sociology and related specialties such as criminology and demography. The first official course in sociology was taught in the early 1950s, but it wasnþt until 1956 that the first full-time sociology position was approved within the Department of Philosophy and Psychology. The Department was renamed the Department of Philosophy and Sociology when the Department of Psychology split off in 1960. In the years that followed, the Department underwent several name and administrative changes. It was known as the Department of Sociology (1961-1963), the Department of Sociology and Anthropology (1963-1966), and again as the Department of Sociology since 1966. Heads: 1960-1961 Anthony Manuel Mardiros; 1961-1963 Robert James; 1963-1969 Gordon Hirabayashi. Chairs: 1969-1970 Gordon Hirabayashi; 1970-1971 John Forster; 1971-1972 Baha Abu-Laban; 1972-1975 Charles Hobart; 1975-1980 Terrence H. White; 1980-1985 Robert Silverman; 1985-1988 Gordon Fearn; 1988- Robert Silverman.

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This department offers coursework in animal physiology, genetics, biochemistry, nutrition and related topics necessary to teach students to solve problems in animal production. It was formed through the amalgamation of three former departments in the Faculty of Agriculture: Animal Husbandry (founded 1917), Veterinary Science (1918) and Poultry Husbandry (1928). Besides preparing undergraduates with career-related training, the Department offers graduate work leading to MSc or PhD degrees. Heads: 1942-1947 John Percy Sackville; 1947-1950 Robert David Sinclair; 1950-1969 Laird Ward McElroy. Chairs: 1969-1972 Laird Ward McElroy; 1972-1977 Larry Patrick Milligan; 1977-1982 Roy Torgny Berg; 1982-1987 Robert Toombs Hardin; 1987- Michael A. 'Mick' Price

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In addition to teaching the application of scientific principles to the solution of agriculture and forestry problems, and through research, the acquiring of new knowledge ... the Department covers the major fields of entomology [and is] especially mindful of the importance of a strong program of graduate study (PACCR, 1987). Among the aspects of insect biology studied are morphology, development, physiology, genetics, biochemistry, insect/plant relationships and population biology. Heads: 1922-1954 Edgar Harold Strickland; 1954-1969 Brian Hocking. Chairs: 1969-1974 Brian Hocking; 1974-1984 George Eugene Ball; 1984-1989 Beverley K. Mitchell; 1989- Ronald H. Gooding.

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In addition to teaching the application of scientific principles to the solution of agriculture and forestry problems, and through research, the acquiring of new knowledge ... the Department covers the major fields of entomology [and is] especially mindful of the importance of a strong program of graduate study (PACCR, 1987). Among the aspects of insect biology studied are morphology, development, physiology, genetics, biochemistry, insect/plant relationships and population biology. Heads: 1922-1954 Edgar Harold Strickland; 1954-1969 Brian Hocking. Chairs: 1969-1974 Brian Hocking; 1974-1984 George Eugene Ball; 1984-1989 Beverley K. Mitchell; 1989- Ronald H. Gooding.

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Instruction in dairy production was administered by a department known successively as Dairying (1921-1959) and Dairy Science (1959-1961). To reflect a widening of scope it was renamed the Department of Dairy and Food Science (1961) before taking its current designation in 1964. The sole source of food science education in Alberta, the Department offers teaching, research, extension and professional activities related to food production, processing, and microbiology (PACCR, 1984). Heads: 1921-1934 Christian P. Marker; 1934-1958 Harold R. Thornton; 1958-1969 Lawrence F.L. Clegg. Chairs: 1969-1974 Lawrence F.L. Clegg; 1974-1982 Harold Jackson; 1982- Frederick Henry Wolfe.

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The Department focuses on the growth, management and use of agriculturally important plants, particularly the application of scientific principles, technology and crop management strategies. Its intent is to provide students with a theoretical background as a foundation for a career in horticulture, plant pathology and related fields. Although it considers professional training its primary objective, the Department encourages research through master and doctor of science programs (PACCR, 1986). The Department was created by the 1944 amalgamation of the Departments of Field Crops (founded 1917) and Horticulture (1935). It was the parent of the Department of Genetics, which separated from the Department of Plant Science in 1961 to be located in the Faculty of Science. Heads, Department of Field Crops: 1917-1927 Garnet Homer Cutler; 1927-1932 Robert Newton; 1932-1935 Olaf Sverre Aamodt; 1935-1941 Kenneth William Neatby; [1941-1944] Arthur Gilbert McCalla (Acting). Heads, Department of Horticulture: 1915-1935 George Harcourt; 1935-1944 James Sheldon Shoemaker. Heads, Department of Plant Science: 1944-1951 Arthur Gilbert McCalla; 1951-1961 John Unrau; 1961-1970 William George Corns; 1962 Mary E. Spencer (Acting); 1968-1969 William Peter Skoropad (Acting); 1970-1975 William H. Vanden Born; 1975-1980 Peter D. Walton; 1980-[1982] William Peter Skoropad; 1982-1987 William H. Vanden Born; 1987- Keith Briggs.

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The Department focuses on the growth, management and use of agriculturally important plants, particularly the application of scientific principles, technology and crop management strategies. Its intent is to provide students with a theoretical background as a foundation for a career in horticulture, plant pathology and related fields. Although it considers professional training its primary objective, the Department encourages research through master and doctor of science programs (PACCR, 1986). The Department was created by the 1944 amalgamation of the Departments of Field Crops (founded 1917) and Horticulture (1935). It was the parent of the Department of Genetics, which separated from the Department of Plant Science in 1961 to be located in the Faculty of Science. Heads, Department of Field Crops: 1917-1927 Garnet Homer Cutler; 1927-1932 Robert Newton; 1932-1935 Olaf Sverre Aamodt; 1935-1941 Kenneth William Neatby; [1941-1944] Arthur Gilbert McCalla (Acting). Heads, Department of Horticulture: 1915-1935 George Harcourt; 1935-1944 James Sheldon Shoemaker. Heads, Department of Plant Science: 1944-1951 Arthur Gilbert McCalla; 1951-1961 John Unrau; 1961-1970 William George Corns; 1962 Mary E. Spencer (Acting); 1968-1969 William Peter Skoropad (Acting); 1970-1975 William H. Vanden Born; 1975-1980 Peter D. Walton; 1980-[1982] William Peter Skoropad; 1982-1987 William H. Vanden Born; 1987- Keith Briggs.

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Known as the Department of Soils until 1949, the Soil Science Department promotes good stewardship of soil resources through teaching, research and extension. It administers the Alberta Soil Survey (established 1921), the Breton Plots (1930) and the Alberta Institute of Pedology (1968) (PACCR, 1988). Lecturer 'Soils I': 1914-1919 Adolph L.F. Lehmann. Heads: 1919-1947 Frank Archibald Wyatt; 1947-1959 John Dawson Newton; 1959-1969 John A. Toogood. Chairs: 1969-1974 John A. Toogood; 1971-1972 Stephen Pawluk (Acting); 1974-1979 Stephen Pawluk; 1979-1989 William B. McGill; 1984-1985 Marvin J. Dudas (Acting); 1989- James A. Robertson.

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Known as the Department of Soils until 1949, the Soil Science Department promotes good stewardship of soil resources through teaching, research and extension. It administers the Alberta Soil Survey (established 1921), the Breton Plots (1930) and the Alberta Institute of Pedology (1968) (PACCR, 1988). Lecturer 'Soils I': 1914-1919 Adolph L.F. Lehmann. Heads: 1919-1947 Frank Archibald Wyatt; 1947-1959 John Dawson Newton; 1959-1969 John A. Toogood. Chairs: 1969-1974 John A. Toogood; 1971-1972 Stephen Pawluk (Acting); 1974-1979 Stephen Pawluk; 1979-1989 William B. McGill; 1984-1985 Marvin J. Dudas (Acting); 1989- James A. Robertson.

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This department is concerned with examining the history, function and purpose of educational institutions, spanning such disciplines as history, anthropology, sociology and philosophy and incorporating the study of comparative, community, intercultural and international education. For undergraduates, it offers coursework on the theories and methodologies regarding schools and good teaching, and for graduate students it helps develop expertise in one of the areas of study under its purview (PACCR, 1984). The Department supports the John Sandercock Library, the Centre for International Education and Development, and publication of the Canadian Journal of Native Education. Heads: 1961-1969 Bernal E. Walker. Chairs: 1969-1971 Bernal E. Walker; 1971-1975 Robert S. Patterson; 1975-1983 Peter J. Miller; 1983-[1988] Robert J. Carney; 1988- M. Kazim Bacchus.

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The Department focuses its teaching and research on three areas: counselling and school psychology, special education (e.g. handicapped and gifted students), and basic educational psychology. Although it contributes to teacher training on the undergraduate level, it has increasingly directed its resources towards its graduate program. Among the sevices it has provided are the Education Clinic, Education Research Services, Test Library, and the Developmental Disabilities Centre. Heads: 1950-1966 George Murray Dunlop; 1966-1969 Bernard R. Corman. Chairs: 1969-1972 Bernard R. Corman; 1972-1978 Wilfred H.O. Schmidt; 1974-1975 Juanita Chambers (Acting); 1978-1988 Harvey Zingle; 1988- Eugene William Romaniuk.

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Undergraduate teacher preparation is the Department's reason for being. Nevertheless, it also invests its resources in graduate education, research, in-service work, and consultation for the University, provincial, national and international educational communities. Heads: 1950-1955 Herbert Thomas Coutts; 1955-1962 Harold Baker; 1962-1965 Lawrence William Downey; 1965-1966 Gerald L. Berry (Acting); 1966-1969 Gerald L. Berry. Chairs: 1969-1978 Gerald L. Berry; 1978-1985 Ted Tetsuo Aoki; 1985- Kenneth Gordon Jacknicke.

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The University of Alberta Mixed Chorus is among the oldest non-sport organizations on campus, tracing its beginning to 1939 when a small choir was formed under the direction of Ottoman Cypress to supply music for Student Christian Movement services. In 1943, the Varsity Choir applied for membership to the Literary Association of the Students Union, allowing the choir to apply for Student Union funding to purchase music for the expanding choir. Rehearsals and practices for the choir were organized for the fall of 1944, under the leadership of Gordon F. Clark, a first-year medical student. Their first concert was presented in Convocation Hall on campus in February 1945. Their repertoire of short classical pieces and traditional folk songs prompted a name change and in 1945, the organization became officially known as the University of Alberta Mixed Chorus. The records have been arranged and described in two broad series and several sub-headings, with a basic chronological order maintained within each series. The textual files provide information about the early years of the Chorus' existence, particularly the years from 1946 to about 1971. Files maintained by the executive and directors (Richard Eaton and James Whittle) are significant for the information they provide about the Chorus' yearly operations and activities. Information in the files after the Whittle years is sketchier, and more incidental in nature. The textual files include correspondence, clippings, some meeting minutes, membership lists, the organization's constitution, and evidence of the planning and fundraising required to orchestrate the annual UAMC Spring Tour. Under Professor Eaton's leadership, which was to last for twenty years, the Chorus increased in size and accomplishment. The Mixed Chorus spring tour started in1947 to meet requests for the Chorus to appear in several Alberta cities and towns. The first tour, held between examination week and convocation in May, saw a group of about 80 members' travel through southern Alberta for nine days, giving a concert each night, and ending with a culminating performance in Convocation Hall in Edmonton. The Chorus dressed in formal attire for the tours; women in pastel evening gowns and men in dark suits and black bow ties. The spring tour (or May Tour) became an important annual event for the Mixed Chorus. Over the intervening years, tours expanded to include visits to communities in Saskatchewan, British Columbia, the Northwest Territories, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Richard Eaton's sudden death while on sabbatical in 1968 was devastating to the Chorus members. James Whittle, a member of the Chorus and Assistant Conductor since 1964, took over as director of the after Professor Eaton's death. He conducted the Chorus in 1968, 1969 and 1971; Dr. David Stocker, a professor in the Department of Music, led the Chorus during 1970. In 1971, Dr. R.E. Stephens, Professor of Music Education at the University of Alberta, assumed the position of Conductor of UAMC, a post he held until 1986. His fifteen years with the Chorus were interrupted briefly by his sabbatical leave in 1979, when Merrill Flewelling conducted the Chorus. Robert de Frece, who sang in the Chorus from 1967 to 1971, took over as director of the UAMC from Ron Stephens in 1986 and is the present director. In 1988, the Faculty of Education Handbell Ringers was established as a separate sub-group available to current members of the Mixed Chorus; the Handbell Ringers perform annually with the UAMC. The Mixed Chorus Alumni Association was established in 1991 to promote continuing contact among Mixed Chorus alumni and to support and promote the activities of the UAMC. An annual alumni dinner is held prior to the Mixed Chorus Spring Concert.

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Edmonton's premier oratorio choir, founded in 1951, was originally called the University Singers. It was renamed in memory of its founding director, Richard S. Eaton, in 1969. It has had a long association with the University of Alberta, as the Choir rehearses on campus and draws its music directors from the Department of Music. The Singers, however, have always been an entity separate from the University, drawing members from the general community and receiving funding from other sources. Directors: 1951-1967 Richard S. Eaton; 1968-1973 Alexandra Munn; 1973-[1982] Larry D. Cook; [1982]- Leonard Ratzlaff.

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The teaching of anthropology was introduced in the late 1950s within the Department of Philosophy and Psychology. In 1963 the joint Department of Sociology and Anthropology was established, and by 1966 two separate departments were formed. The Department's personnel, facilities, teaching function, and research emphasis are organized around four programs: 1. archaeology and paleoenvironmental studies; 2. physical anthropology and primatology; 3. culture contact, development and world problems; 4. symbolic, linguistic and cognitive analysis (PACCR, 1986). Chairs: 1966-1970 Charles S. Brant; 1967-1968 Harold Barclay (Acting); 1971-1975 Henry T. Lewis; 1975-1978 C. Roderick Wilson; 1978-1981 Clifford G. Hickey; 1981-1982 Michael Asch (Acting); 1982-1986 Michael Asch; 1986-[1990] Henry T. Lewis; 1990- David Lubell .

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The Department of English was one of the four original departments established in 1908. Its first professor, Edmund Kemper Broadus, was faced with the task of setting the standard and program for entering students. From the start, the Department had the important service function of training students of every faculty to write, and of giving them an acquaintance with literature. The Department offers a broad range of courses in literature and language, and offers specialization in the areas of Canadian literature (especially prairie fiction), and creative writing. The English honours program is the largest in the Faculty of Arts. Heads: 1908-1936 Edmund Kemper Broadus; 1936-1950 Robert Kay Gordon; 1950-1953 Frederick Millet Salter; 1953-1961 John Thomas Jones; 1961-1967 Henry Kreisel. Chairs: 1968-1971 R. George Baldwin; 1971-1976 Edward Rose; 1976-1981 Roland Anderson; 1981-1986 David Jackel; 1986-1989 Linda Woodbridge; 1989-1992 Maurice Roger Legris.

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The Department of Modern Languages was established in 1908 as one of the original members of the Faculty of Arts and Science. At first, only two courses in French and two in German were offered by the Department's sole member and head, W.A.R. Kerr (who later served simultaneously as Head of the Department and Dean of the Faculty). In the 1960s, rapid growth was accompanied by far-reaching changes in the Department's administration and structure. The Department had split itself unofficially into Romance, Germanic, and Slavic Divisions, each with its own 'Division Head.' The formal creation of three separate Departments occurred in 1964 (PACCR, 1981). Heads: 1908-1909 Luther Herbert Alexander; 1909-1936 William Alexander Robb Kerr; 1936- 1947 Edouard Sonet; 1947-1952 Francis Owen; 1952-1953 Dennis McNeice Healey; 1953-1964 Edward Joseph Hollingsworth Greene.

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The Department of Fine Arts, established in 1945, included music, drama and visual arts under the leadership of Henry George Glyde. The Bachelor of Music degree was instituted in 1958, and the Master of Music degree in 1968. Fine Arts split into its present three departments in 1965. Over the years, the Department's staff and students have enriched the cultural climate in Edmonton and its environs through bands, choirs, orchestras, opera productions, radio and television concerts and lectures, and production of new music, to name some examples. The Department cooperates with the Western Board of Music to provide a comprehensive study syllabus and examination program used widely by music teachers throughout Alberta and Western Canada (PACCR, 1983). Heads: 1947-1965 Richard S. Eaton. Chairs: 1965-1968 Richard S. Eaton; 1969-1986 Robert Stangeland; 1986-[1990] Alfred Fisher; [1990]- Wesley Berg.

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Political Science courses were first offered by the Department of Political Economy in 1923. Dr. Henry Bertram Mayo, the University's first political scientist, was appointed in 1947, and was Acting Head from 1951 to 1957. In 1964, Political Economy split into the Departments of Economics and Political Science. The Department's primary role is to educate students about the nature and activity of the state and the conduct of its government and politics, the government and politics of other societies and the interaction of such governments, and about individual rights and obligations (PACCR, 1984). Heads: 1964-1965 Grant R. Davy; 1966-1969 Christian Bay. Chairs: 1969-1972 Grant R. Davy; 1972-1974 J. Peter Meekison; 1975-1982 Roberta E. McKown; 1982-1985 Frederick C. Engelmann; 1985- Allan Tupper.

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With roots in coursework offered in the University's former Department of Political Economy, the subject of rural economy was established in its own department under successive name changes: Agricultural Economics and Farm Management (1961), Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology (1969), and by its current designation (1975). The object of the Department of Rural Economy is to study and teach about the relationship between the agriculture and forestry industries and the general economy and the effect of this relationship on the environment and rural people; that is, the economics of farming. It concerns itself with on-campus teaching, research, extension and community service (PACCR, 1981). Professor: [1960-1961?] A. Gordon Ball. Heads: 1962-1969 Travis W. Manning. Chairs: 1969- 1974 Travis W. Manning; 1974-1978 Thomas Alfred Petersen; 1978-1987 Milburn L. Lerohl; 1987 William E. Phillips.

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Known as the Faculty of Agriculture until 1972, its name change recognized the introduction of the forestry program in 1970. The Faculty provides teaching facilities for obtaining primary and a advanced science degrees in agriculture, forestry and food science. It also administers a two-year pre-Veterinary Medicine program. The Faculty holds sites on and off the campus for conducting practical research to solve problems in the agriculture and forestry fields. Deans: 1915-1940 Ernest Albert Howes; 1940-1941 Robert Newton; 1941-1951 Robert David Sinclair; 1951-1959 Arthur Gilbert McCalla; 1959-1968 C. Fred Bentley; 1968-1975 Fenton Vincent MacHardy; 1975-1983 John Bowland; 1983-1988 Roy Torgny Berg; 1988- Edward W. Tyrchniewicz.

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Studio Theatre was established in 1949 as a place for Drama Division students to practice their craft and hone their skills. Staff of the Drama Division of the Department of Fine Arts operated the Theatre, and early participants included Robert Orchard, Gordon Peacock, Bert Pullinger, Frank Glenfield, Elizabeth Sterling Haynes, Don Pimm, and Tom Peacocke. The Theatre site was located in two deserted Second World War Quonset huts. The Quonset huts, placed side by side, contained between them a stage, auditorium, workshop, drama offices, and foyer. The first play produced on the Quonset stage was Henry IV, and for the next eight seasons over forty full-act plays, numerous one-act plays, two world premieres, and six Canadian premieres were produced on the Quonset Studio Theatre stage. The Quonset huts were torn down in 1958, and Studio Theatre was offered auditorium and classroom space in the Education Building (E.A. Corbett Hall). Studio Theatre occupied this space through to June 1989, winding up its 40th season anniversary with Michael Frayn's Benefactor just prior to the closing of Corbett Hall for renovations on June 17, 1989. Studio Theatre then operated from the Myer Horowitz stage and, in 1995, moved to its new home in the newly opened Timms Centre. Studio Theatre celebrated its 50th anniversary of operation in the spring of 1999, and continues in the present to provide Edmonton audiences with a varied and unique theatre experience.

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The Department of History and Political Economy was established in 1915/16, offering one course in economics and a moderate variety in history. In 1920/21 the Department split and the new Department of Political Economy emerged, offering fourteen courses. Political Economy split into the Departments of Economics and Political Science in 1964. The Department has three main academic tasks: to cultivate economics as a branch of civilized knowledge; to provide economics courses as part of the training in various professional programs; and to train economists as professionals in their own right through its graduate and honours programs. (PACCR, 1981). Professors: 1920-1929 Duncan A. MacGibbon; 1929-1946 George Alexander Elliott; 1946-1950 Andrew Stewart; 1950-1957 Henry B. Mayo. Heads: 1957-1964 Eric J. Hanson; 1964-1969 Walter D. Gainer. Chairs: 1969-1972 Thomas L. Powrie; 1972-1977 Bruce W. Wilkinson; 1977- 1987 Brian L. Scarfe; 1987- Melville L. McMillan.

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The Department of English was one of the four original departments established in 1908. Its first professor, Edmund Kemper Broadus, was faced with the task of setting the standard and program for entering students. From the start, the Department had the important service function of training students of every faculty to write, and of giving them an acquaintance with literature. The Department offers a broad range of courses in literature and language, and offers specialization in the areas of Canadian literature (especially prairie fiction), and creative writing. The English honours program is the largest in the Faculty of Arts. Heads: 1908-1936 Edmund Kemper Broadus; 1936-1950 Robert Kay Gordon; 1950-1953 Frederick Millet Salter; 1953-1961 John Thomas Jones; 1961-1967 Henry Kreisel. Chairs: 1968-1971 R. George Baldwin; 1971-1976 Edward Rose; 1976-1981 Roland Anderson; 1981-1986 David Jackel; 1986-1989 Linda Woodbridge; 1989-1992 Maurice Roger Legris.

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Slavic and East European Studies (SEES) was formed in 1982 by the amalgamation of the Department of Slavic Languages and the Division of East European Studies. The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures had been created in 1964 from the division of Department of Modern Languages. Its name was changed to Slavic Languages in [1969]. The Departmentþs objective is to maintain the viability of programs leading (from the BA through the MA) to the PhD in Russian Literature, Ukrainian Literature, Ukrainian Folklore, and Slavic Linguistics, and to the MA in East European and Soviet Studies (PACCR, 1987). Heads: 1964-[1968] Orest Starchuk. Chairs: 1968-[1969?] Orest Starchuk; 1969-1974 Gunter Schaarschmidt; 1974-1981 Tom M.S. Priestly; 1981-1989 Robert L. Busch; 1989- Tom M.S. Priestly.

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This department offers coursework in animal physiology, genetics, biochemistry, nutrition and related topics necessary to teach students to solve problems in animal production. It was formed through the amalgamation of three former departments in the Faculty of Agriculture: Animal Husbandry (founded 1917), Veterinary Science (1918) and Poultry Husbandry (1928). Besides preparing undergraduates with career-related training, the Department offers graduate work leading to MSc or PhD degrees. Heads: 1942-1947 John Percy Sackville; 1947-1950 Robert David Sinclair; 1950-1969 Laird Ward McElroy. Chairs: 1969-1972 Laird Ward McElroy; 1972-1977 Larry Patrick Milligan; 1977-1982 Roy Torgny Berg; 1982-1987 Robert Toombs Hardin; 1987- Michael A. 'Mick' Price

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The Department of Forest Science offers courses leading to a BSc (Forestry) as well as to graduate degrees in forest science and a specialized MSc degree in Wildland Recreation. The department aims to train foresters with the ability to apply current knowledge and adapt new information to practice forestry competently; and to foster graduate studies and research; encourage technology transfer through extension programs; and to cooperate with industry, government and other University departments in order to increase teaching and research opportunities (PACCR, 1983). Chairs: 1971-1974 John David Schultz; 1974-1975 Peter John Murphy (Acting); 1975-[1984] Peter John Murphy; 1980-1981 James A. Beck (Acting); 1984-1989 James A. Beck; 1989- Bruce P. Dancik.

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The Department of Forest Science offers courses leading to a BSc (Forestry) as well as to graduate degrees in forest science and a specialized MSc degree in Wildland Recreation. The department aims to train foresters with the ability to apply current knowledge and adapt new information to practice forestry competently; and to foster graduate studies and research; encourage technology transfer through extension programs; and to cooperate with industry, government and other University departments in order to increase teaching and research opportunities (PACCR, 1983). Chairs: 1971-1974 John David Schultz; 1974-1975 Peter John Murphy (Acting); 1975-[1984] Peter John Murphy; 1980-1981 James A. Beck (Acting); 1984-1989 James A. Beck; 1989- Bruce P. Dancik.

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This department is concerned with examining the history, function and purpose of educational institutions, spanning such disciplines as history, anthropology, sociology and philosophy and incorporating the study of comparative, community, intercultural and international education. For undergraduates, it offers coursework on the theories and methodologies regarding schools and good teaching, and for graduate students it helps develop expertise in one of the areas of study under its purview (PACCR, 1984). The Department supports the John Sandercock Library, the Centre for International Education and Development, and publication of the Canadian Journal of Native Education. Heads: 1961-1969 Bernal E. Walker. Chairs: 1969-1971 Bernal E. Walker; 1971-1975 Robert S. Patterson; 1975-1983 Peter J. Miller; 1983-[1988] Robert J. Carney; 1988- M. Kazim Bacchus.

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This department's range of responsibilities includes the instruction of elementary school teachers, graduate program supervision, research, and publications. It also serves the University and educational community at large, participating on committees, providing workshops and presentations at conferences, and acting as a consultant for various educational organizations (PACCR, 1985). Heads: 1950-1961 William Dewar McDougall; 1961-1966 Walter Holms Worth; 1967 Neil M. Purvis (Acting); 1967-1968 Arthur Kratzmann; 1968-1969 Leonard Doyal Nelson (Acting). Chairs: 1969-1972 Myer Horowitz; 1972-1977 David Allister McKay; 1977-[1985] Patricia A. McFetridge; 1985-1990 Warren D. Wilde.Multiple media, 1950-1985,

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Undergraduate teacher preparation is the Department's reason for being. Nevertheless, it also invests its resources in graduate education, research, in-service work, and consultation for the University, provincial, national and international educational communities. Heads: 1950-1955 Herbert Thomas Coutts; 1955-1962 Harold Baker; 1962-1965 Lawrence William Downey; 1965-1966 Gerald L. Berry (Acting); 1966-1969 Gerald L. Berry. Chairs: 1969-1978 Gerald L. Berry; 1978-1985 Ted Tetsuo Aoki; 1985- Kenneth Gordon Jacknicke.

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